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brandenjg

Pimping Tender + the boat insurance???

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Hello, I use an inflatable tender as my main boat on the broads (I'm a simple man). I've decided to keep myself busy by fixing up the boat. So far i've made 2 fishing rod holders, a mudweight, seat bag storage and a waterproof cover for the bow. All thats left is putting an outboard on when the new toll year begins.

After great advice in a previous post im going for a 2hp outboard (not electric). I've checked the tolls and was slightly shocked at the price increase but decided it was fair enough. I then noticed that I would need to also buy insurance aswell???

I guess my question is whether i should also fit metal spikes to the front of my boat so that if i do hit anyone rather than bounce off.... you get the idea that I'm being sarcastic.

I do find it a cheek though that a sailing dinghy swerving across the water non stop doesn't need insurance but my boat going in a straight line is deemed more likely to cause damage.

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I do find it a cheek though that a sailing dinghy swerving across the water non stop doesn't need insurance but my boat going in a straight line is deemed more likely to cause damage.

That'll ruffle a few feathers :grin:

Even though it's not compulsory under the BA rules, I think you'll find that all sailing dinghies involved in racing, (on the Broads or otherwise) are required to have 2 million pounds third party insurance by the club that they belong to and are racing under. Most sailing Clubs have imposed that condition for many decades now.

Having said that, I can completely understand your surprise, and you've perceived the rubber dinghy "risk" in almost exactly the same words that I used myself some time ago. Even if I raced full speed ahead at anyone in my 8ft rubber dinghy with either the electric or 2hp outboard, it would result in a loud squishing sound, and I'd probably fall out, leaving not a mark on the boat I'd hit.

By contrast, a decent sized wooden sailing craft (eg a traditional half decker) could do quite a bit of damage with the weight behind it, and yet yes, if it had no auxiliary power and was not club racing, then it would not require any insurance whatsoever.

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But who would have a boat, any boat without insuring it?

Probably the same kind of knob that would run it into another boat so not much of a comfort really.

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A master of the water wouldn't :P You tend to find those with insurance would be more inclined to risky behaviour because of the fall back of a tasty cheque.

I feel the insurance companies would always take the word of the the larger boat owner so I'd be screwed over even if i wasnt at fault.

I'll buy the insurance but i wont be smiling when i do.

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You tend to find those with insurance would be more inclined to risky behaviour because of the fall back of a tasty cheque.

That reminds me, I have just insured my car, so beware when I am on the road, because I will now be more inclined to drive like a loon, cos I will have a nice tasty cheque to fall back on if anything happens.

cheersbar

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I was ranting when i said that, my point was that with insurance or not I'd still manouver in the exact same way on the broads following all the guidelines. I simply meant that i was annoyed at the extra charge for insurance which i havn't needed for the past year but once i put a motor on I'll then need it.

We row at about a walking speed 3mph (when our lungs are alive) the engine will mean we'll b travelling at 4mph but will also be able to manouver quicker in an emergency situation so I'll be even less likely to crash.

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Branden The thing is, insurance is a necessary evil (if you look at it like that), it is not only to cover the person you bang into, but to cover you as well. Lets say that you were pootling down the river, obeying all byelaws etc, and your engine got stuck on full power, you lost all stearage because the tiller got stuck and smashed into a big tree that was hanging over the bank. It caused damage to your boat. Without insurance no boat, with insurance at least hope to get it sorted.

You could always but a broom handle and a big hanky, to put on your boat to save on insurance. :Sailing

:Stinky

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Very true the last thing i want is to be without my boat. I just worry under what circumstances the insurance would pay out. The process must be different from driving on the road where theres eye witnesses and cameras :?

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it is not only to cover the person you bang into, but to cover you as well.

This is where it gets more convoluted, the BA's compulsory insurance edict for powered craft is for third party cover only.

I agree completely about the piece of mind of insurance for craft of a certain size or value. Long before it was mandatory, I've always had fully comprehensive cover for all of my cruisers.

The problem with forcing it for small, low powered inflatables is that even the third party cover is quite out of proportion to the value. I have a neighbour who is an OAP and used to run an 8ft inflatable with a 2hp. The boat and engine is worth about £200, and the BA license is half that each year. Now that TP insurance is also compulsory, that's another £50 a year....

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A little off topic, but insurance related, last night a young lad managed to total 2 parked cars out side our house, and his own too (fortunately for us non of ours!) and put his mate in hospital, this is a 30mph apparently traffic calmed zone, looking a the mess he made of all 3 cars he must have been doing 60 - 70 mph! Anyway during a conversation with the attending police office he asked "will I have to inform my insurers?" It seems this guy is the exception Darwin's survival of the fitted theory!

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A little off topic, but insurance related, last night a young lad managed to total 2 parked cars out side our house, and his own too (fortunately for us non of ours!) and put his mate in hospital, this is a 30mph apparently traffic calmed zone, looking a the mess he made of all 3 cars he must have been doing 60 - 70 mph! Anyway during a conversation with the attending police office he asked "will I have to inform my insurers?" It seems this guy is the exception Darwin's survival of the fitted theory!

Look on the bright side at least it sounds as if he was insured!

Now whether he will be next year when they load the premium to take the cost of this one into account is another matter.

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I am confused...... :?

Is the OP using his tender for illegal practices

Pimp = a man who controls prostitutes and arranges clients for them, taking a percentage of their earnings in return

If the BA find out about this they will want their cut for sure.

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I am confused...... :?

Is the OP using his tender for illegal practices

Pimp = a man who controls prostitutes and arranges clients for them, taking a percentage of their earnings in return

If the BA find out about this they will want their cut for sure.

Well I did wonder, but I was too shy to show my naivety, I'm not very worldly-wise with "modern lingo".

Yes, to my ancient mind it did sound like a pink Oldsmobile with furry wing mirrors.... :naughty:

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Ah Perry you aren't getting down with the modern lingo. However if the OP has forgotten to mention those mods then his insurance may be as worthless as a BA promise!

I Hope i would'nt have to mention as none are permanently fixed or electrical :? Ill definately have to look into that.

If anyone wants me i'll the the person with the peacock feather hat and the diamond on a cane... Its a pimps life for me :)

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Look on the bright side at least it sounds as if he was insured!

Now whether he will be next year when they load the premium to take the cost of this one into account is another matter.

And NOT just HIS premium either :evil::evil: . Insurance companies are the only people who steal from you with legal ease, or is that just me being a little synical again?. Why go to the expense of trying to obtain all the extra premium from him, when it`s so much easier to just wack up the premiums of everybody else who possibly has`nt made a claim in 20 years or more?.

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A little off topic, but insurance related, last night a young lad managed to total 2 parked cars out side our house, and his own too (fortunately for us non of ours!) and put his mate in hospital, this is a 30mph apparently traffic calmed zone, looking a the mess he made of all 3 cars he must have been doing 60 - 70 mph! Anyway during a conversation with the attending police office he asked "will I have to inform my insurers?" It seems this guy is the exception Darwin's survival of the fitted theory!

The thing is, unless the law has changed recently, there is no legal requirement for anybody to notify their insurance company in the event of a motor traffic accident. So the young tearaways question was possibly quite legitamate. Infact, i think, though i may be wrong, that you are, or were, not legally bound to admit to a motor traffic accident?. Either way, the tearaway won`t be paying for the damage, unlike the rest of us.

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The thing is, unless the law has changed recently, there is no legal requirement for anybody to notify their insurance company in the event of a motor traffic accident.

It's a bit of a grey area, but the bottom line is that if you don't notify your insurer of any material facts then they'll more than happily cancel the policy if they find out (usually in the event of another claim or them being notified by the third party's insurer) because of the non-disclosure. Some insurers are worse than others for doing it (I'm not naming any names!) but believe me it does go on in the insurance industry.

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I can well believe it John. The trouble is, insurance companies are a law unto themselves, and even though they get away with "sharp practices", the moment the individual tries it, they start getting tough. Unfortunately, no government will put a stop to it because they will lose the dreaded vat on premiums.

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I can well believe it John. The trouble is, insurance companies are a law unto themselves, and even though they get away with "sharp practices", the moment the individual tries it, they start getting tough. Unfortunately, no government will put a stop to it because they will lose the dreaded vat on premiums.

There is no VAT on insurance premiums, there is IPT which is charged at 6% and unlike VAT cannot be reclaimed as in input by registered companies, quite a bit less than the 20% usual rate of VAT, there is an exception however, those silly extended warranties that Currys et al try to sell you are charged at an IPT of 20%

Personally I've never had an issue with insurance claims (touch wood), two on the boat, a number of car related, a couple of household and a few business ones including defamation defence costs whilst in publishing. Mind you I do take the time to inform them of any "notifiable event" or material fact as that can cause issues. It's a bit weird this insurance stuff, on my current car there are a number of "extras" that they said would have bumped the premium quite a bit if fitted as after market but because they were specified new and factory fitted before delivery meant I got the unloaded premium as for a standard car of that model, go figure.

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