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Lazy owners of frozen engines not covered by insurers

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David do you know of any videos out there that tell your properly how to winterise your boat as all ive seen are for petrol inboards & outboards .... not that some are lazy just some dont have the right info or fo have the right info but dont know what there doing....

Jonny

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"Lazy owners of frozen engines not covered by insurers"

I have to admit I was surprised that anyone could ever get insurance compensation for cracked blocks and manifolds for engines that had not been drained or filled with antifreeze.

I'd be very disappointed if premiums increased for people who did Winterise to pay for people who didn't....

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I'd be very disappointed if premiums increased for people who did Winterise to pay for people who didn't....

Just like any insurance....... the people who do take care, are penalised by the people who don't.....

As in car insurance, nutty drivers claim, I PAY

THATS LIFE, UNFORTUNATELY

cheersbar

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Just like any insurance....... the people who do take care, are penalised by the people who don't.....

As in car insurance, nutty drivers claim, I PAY

THATS LIFE, UNFORTUNATELY

cheersbar

Yes, quite true, or Insurance for the majority of drivers (who don't cause accidents) would be about £50 a year.

The point about damage through not winterising a boat engine though, is that it's premeditated, like not renewing your car MOT, which does invalidate your car insurance.

In the UK we only occasionally get sustained sub zero temps like 2010/2011, so most people get away with it. The consequences of a freeze up for some engines though, (with raw water cooling systems) is a cracked block, which is usually unrepairable, requiring a new engine, at several thousand pounds.... :shocked

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David do you know of any videos out there that tell your properly how to winterise your boat as all ive seen are for petrol inboards & outboards .... not that some are lazy just some dont have the right info or fo have the right info but dont know what there doing....

Jonny

Loads on Youtube Jonny, just type winterise boat, or winterise diesel engine in the search box, many are by suppliers of winterising stuff but there are some that are solely instructional and not trying to flog you winterising snake oil.

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The point about damage through not winterising a boat engine though, is that it's premeditated, like not renewing your car MOT, which does invalidate your car insurance.

Sadly, having spent a number of years in the insurance industry I can tell you that a car with no MOT will be covered (provided there's a policy in force) as it is required to be by law. Whilst it may seem ridiculous, I believe the thinking on that one is that the third party should be indemnified even if the policyholder can't be bothered to get the car tested. It would be valued as a car with no MOT though when it comes to settlement values.

I think cracked blocks due to lack of winterising are a different issue as there's not likely to be any third party liability.. And I can't imagine a loss adjuster being very sympathetic. Whether it's covered is probably down to the particular insurer's exclusions; although I must admit that Marine is not my area.

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Just a thought, albeit everso slightly off topic as the title does specifically refer to engines. Lets not forget the other areas on a boat that can be damaged by freezing, namely the domestic water and the bog.

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