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PCL023

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  1. Engine load most likely has the largest contributing factor to fuel consumption, then tides depending where you are, followed by hull design. There are those that will say most broads boats are all displacement hulls and this makes little difference, however I would beg to differ. There are some boats that would appear to glide and cut through the water much better than others, where at the end of a long trip, 3 boats with almost the same BMC engines, two used a lot more fuel than the “pacemaker” we were following. Also depends if your towing a water break.... 🚣‍♂️ Cheers Paul
  2. Hi Andrew That is correct; in England and most of the UK we have fewer public holidays, however unlike some other countries if ours fall on a weekend, they default to the next Monday, where in some of the other countries they don’t and are therefore part of the normal weekend etc. If they fall on these. Though I would agree never to knock more public holidays, (as long as the weather is good of course). Cheers Paul
  3. Just how nice is it that someone goes to such great efforts in arranging all this, with maybe a little help here and there. would have been nice to see them all or be involved having a fully biodegradable in the family, see pic. but for other plans etc we could not make it. what makes a classic in car terms, it tends to be when it becomes tax exempt, don’t see that happening any time soon on some of our boats. 😜 anything boat wise built pre - 1980’s I would punt for as a classic. But it’s a little bit more tricky, what about such things as have they been heavily restored like Triggers broom? So what, this is what they all need at some point to keep them going. Also what abut some boats that have been completely redeveloped where they look the same as the originals but have been built more recently? There are a few day boats and yachts we know of where this has been done. Any way just killing some time at the moment, however I fully agree with floydraser above. 👍 cheers Paul
  4. Sounds like there was an air lock in the tank, this could percolate it’s way in to the keel cooler over time. it was a very long time ago we had this issue on Nice One. I seem to remember we may have ended flushing the system the other way around, as the stat will shut when cold water hits it. So from below the engine water pump flush the hose through the keel cooler through the tank, until it runs clear out of the top of the header tank, (cap removed), Then remove the water hose and put it in to the header tank and connect the disconnected lower keel pipe. Are you loosing any coolant when running? if not it’s a tricky one which I’m thinking pressure cap or water pump? Most likely it could just be a bit of air left in the system that’s not been flushed through. Cheers Paul
  5. It’s the best way to get any air locks out of the keel cooler. The engine water pump will not be able to push it through in some cases. Once water is flowing nicely from the return, pop the hose in the header tank while you quickly remake the connections, a spare pair of hands is very handy when doing this. cheers Paul
  6. As we call it in the shipping industry: “MacGyver” tape. 😜
  7. Had this in the past with dads boat, also installed with a keel cooler. They can be prone to air locks normally if there is a small leak or if the pipe feeding the clarorfiera has dropped. If not tried already flush it through with a hose pipe, so there’s only water coming from the feed back to the engine. With quick hands remake the connections.
  8. We use EVA boat flooring. It has a very strong self adhesive backing which is stuck to boards, it to can be lifted taken home and pressure washed if ever needed. It’s mainly for outside deck use such as fly bridges etc. Inside the boat it’s great and soft under foot. Any impressions from items like chairs disappear. Water proof and wipe clean etc. Plenty of the stuff on the supplier’s of choice sites, such as the bay, many colour options and roll sizes. We did the lot with 5 rolls at about £38.00 per roll. (120x90) Very easy to fit, and cheap enough if it fails after a few years, though it’s holding up just fine after the first year of abuse. Just did the last part in the cockpit the other month. ( alloy edging trims also now installed). it could be worth a look? Cheers Paul
  9. You could try IRCM. We have used them for over 12 years, (never had to make a claim). They may require a valuation report, you would need to check. The policies are underwritten by Lloyd’s or Axa, I cannot remember who is the under writer this year? Cheers Paul
  10. Actually and as stated she is an original Judith, though by original she would have had the elongated windows, it was the original similar shape Janet’s that had the port holes. Juliette’s are quite a bit different, longer for starters and not so much of a rake in the midships, the hull too is different, turning up at the stern. Cheers Paul
  11. Found Chunky’s in Hoveton/wroxham, holds a good stock of things including bait. From the front it’s a pet shop, walk through to the back, is where the fishing stuff is, it’s where the old angling direct was before it moved, just up from the Kings Head, almost opposite where the butchers was and next to the car garage. Cheers Paul
  12. I should have taken a photo when I was there last week... i have found this. Where there is a circle ⭕️ with an x in it is where the valve is located on ours. It’s a leaver type on ours with a green pipe going to it. As mentioned by the others it could also be a different type of valve. There is likely to be only two skin fittings. 1 or 2 for the heat exchanger, depending on set up, these are normally next to the gearbox and house the weed filters. The other is the toilet inlet, where on many of the Oceans it’s located under the back cockpit hatch just forward to where you step in. I hope the picture loads, as it’s my first time loading a photo.... Really hope this helps.
  13. You could also see if the folks at Martham have any June launches? There were at one time a fair few dotted around, some not in that bad shape either at the valley works/sheds. Some may have been lost in the big clear up a few years back? I think they may also have a Jose launch somewhere as well? Very classic. Cheers Paul
  14. Hi Steve On our Ocean 30 MKII, the sea cock for the toilet inlet is under the rear cockpit floor towards the port side, kind of next to the diesel thank. To be fair it is a bit of a pig to get to. These can of course have been placed in different locations depending on who fitted them out etc. Don’t hold me to the reason for locating it there, my guess is other ares on the hull may have been too low and may pick up sediment and weed, along with should anything get stuck, it may be possible to reach under the boat to clear without having to lift out. It is quite a long run on the pipe, which is downhill to the toilet if it flows the hull. One of our boat next door neighbours had an issue with his, once he had found the Sea cock was shut, opened it hardly any thing. Due to the lack of use the snail population had partly covered the intake. Best regards Paul
  15. I know they can be deemed as a pain sometimes, getting in the way when mooring and having to drag them around everywhere, (not the wife), but to help take the pressure off finding moorings we normally have the dinghy in tow. This way if we leave it too late or just don’t want to raft up or cram in with others at crowed spots, we can in most cases still enjoy a beer/meal in a pub, or get to a landing spot for a walk, from either a wild mooring or popping the weight over on a broad. This way you always have a plan “B”, with a few get you out of trouble quick meals and a good stock of drinks on board just in case 😉. It’s not for everyone, but something to ponder upon, if it may make life easier in some cases? Cheers Paul
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