Jump to content
  • Announcements

    Welcome! New around here? Take a look at the New Members' Guide for some pointers.

    Not a member yet? Sign up here and you can soon be chatting away with friends old and new..

    Check out our Handy Information section if you're after something quickly!

grendel

Broad Ambition - The Model

Recommended Posts

I don't say "Wow" very often either, though I do say it more than I say "Glockenspiel". On this occasion I feel "Glockenspiel" might be inappropriate (it usually is) so I shall join in with all those saying "Wow!"

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

one last little update for now, i have now done the folding side at the rear of the cockpit, 

IMG_2562.JPG

IMG_2563.JPG

IMG_2564.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

having fallen ill with the dreaded cold on thursday i have been staying in best i can so little bits are getting done, the other two side flaps have been hinged and i have started laying the floor joists in the cockpit area.

IMG_2565.JPG

IMG_2566.JPG

IMG_2567.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this of course sent me out to the workshop where 1/2" off the teak plank was converted to 5mm x 10mm joists on the band saw, then sanded up using the belt sander on the bench, i will need to true up the edge on the teak plank before cutting more thin strips from it, so when i get 10 minutes i will get the thicknesser out and true up the remaining piece (its still over 2" x 1" thick, so i am getting a lot of smaller timbers from this one plank. and i still have a bigger piece left to play with. as many of the trimming pieces as possible will be formed from these original planks of Broad Ambition teak (these planks were offcuts from the ongoing repairs at one of the annual maintenance weeks - the rest of the planks are in the bottom of Broad Ambition)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little goes a long way but only if it's someone who can cut it with skill like yourself, a modelling ninja in my opinion 👍

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will admit that sometimes I do make mistakes, this weekends one was a basic rookie error when I thickened up the area to take the hinges, having glued in the pieces and fitted the hinges I suddenly descovered i had effectively prevented the rear cabin roof being removable, so the glued in parts had to be removed and larger parts glued in and the roof trimmed to fit around these new parts, ho hum, not a catastrophe but a lesson that even the best of us can make mistakes.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

today it was more work on the inside of the cockpit, a wide thin piece of teak was chosen, and cardboard patterns were made up and the inner sides of the cockpit were cut out this piece was 3" wide by just a shade over 2mm thick, and has been cut to size ready for fitting.

a recess will be cut into the top and a handle will be fitted to the top of the window sash to allow the sash to be raised. 

IMG_2568.JPG

IMG_2569.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I can't ever remember having a 6ft scalpel weighing in at around 25kg's on the Port deck !

Griff

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, grendel said:

a recess will be cut into the top and a handle will be fitted to the top of the window sash to allow the sash to be raised. 

Before I started following this build I'd have thought "no way" but as it's you Grendel I don't doubt it for a minute :default_beerchug:

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

an interesting development on the 3d printing front has made me consider, I have recently got some flexible filament, and with this I could reprint the fenders to enable them to have some flex, this filament I found required one to purchase a complete new hot end for my printer (£92) and the filament is about £28 so not a cheap option, I am currently running some test print meccano tyres to see just how flexible it is at a 50% hexagonal infill the answer is not very (so perfect for tyres and items to simulate fenders, but I am trying a test run with a lower fill ratio ro see if that makes a better tyre / fender.

the purchase of a second spare hot end will also allow me to print in PLA so I can print more clear parts (light fittings etc)

the problem being that these hot ends are only good for a single filament type as the different melting points of the filaments would cause clogs in the nozzle if a cooler filament type is used and the nozzle is not scrupulously clean (a virtual impossibility)

IMG_2574.JPG

IMG_2575.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's pretty cool, the tyre looks good. Can picture a nice set of white walls on a model classic car! As ever your attention to detail regarding the fenders is amazing! 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you do a ' blue ' fender too. :default_biggrin:

Honestly, I'm really jealous of your skills. I can't wait to see more next year.

Best regards and Merry Christmas 

Colin :default_drinks:

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

we already have a blue fender, the question is whether i bother to reprint these in a more flexible material, one to ponder on i think.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well I just had to try, this meant refitting the flex hot end, and filament and a reasonably quick 20 minute test print with a 10% infill, this gives a suitably squishy fender, with probably the same give to finger pressure as a real fender has between the quay and the boat, so I have even more thinking to do now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok here it is, the print is a bit patchy where it finished off, but I can probably improve that, but it is squishable.

IMG_20191223_074849.jpg

IMG_20191223_074857.jpg

IMG_20191223_081413.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why have you put an upgraded hotend on for flex? What printer have got? Fenders look good though!

Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a da vinci printer the 1.0 Ai0, this has quick change hot ends, the main reason for changing out the hot end is that each filament type has a different melting temperature, i normally use abs, which has the hottest nozzle temperature, abs is fine as it will clear ant cooler melting filament from the nozzle, the other filaments with the lower temperature however cant clear abs out of the nozzle as it doesnt melt at the temperatures they work at, so unless you want to rigorous cleaning routine such as soaking the nozzle in acetone, which would mean removing the nozzle from the quick change hot end and soaking it, then ensuring it is reassembled at the correct height, then the better option is a nozzle dedicated to each filament type, it only takes about 30 seconds to swap out the nozzles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh it looks like xyz have got you jumping through some hoops there. On a bowden printer (or even most modern direct drives) you may need to just change the extruder (or print a mod), that's only if it's not feeding correctly, the hot end element is fine as long as it's all set up correctly. 

If you have had your fun from that one you may want to have a look around for a newer machine, obviously the 3d printing world is moving very quickly and even the cheapest printer now does amazing prints (well kinda) and removes a lot of messing around.  i.e I rarely clean a nozzle but I don't really need to (hot pulling means they come out clean and its easier just to either bin the nozzle (or run cleaning filament through), although I find the ware out before I need to clean them!  New opensource printers are also highly customisable, you really can run different filamants through without any probs, I can switch from wood, to carbon to alloy even on the same print with no probs, opensource slicers also do funky stuff to make it easy.

For your model making too you may want to try and look at resin printers, as you have such an amazing eye for detail! you may find these a good investment as the detail is way beyond a fdm printer.  Prices at £200 quid now really can't go wrong. 

Also please just be very very careful with printing in ABS, despite what XYZ may say it's pretty lethal stuff, you really only want to be printing these really outside.  I refuse to print with it certainly considering when there's no need with good pla's and pet(g)'s.

Sorry for changing subject.. Love watching this post, you really do have such an eye for detail and a skill for model making.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have considered a resin printer for smaller detail stuff, so maybe when this years bonus comes through.

the xyz printer was (when i bought it) one of the few really plug and  play printers, all the settings controlled by the chip in the cartridge, (the newer pro ones can also work with other filament) but that was a limitation i accepted having seen others trials just getting the settings right to get the first print, mine was up and running as soon as i got it. since my skills are in cad, the design was for me the easy bit. i accepted these limitations when i chose it, and still have no regrets, so obviously for me that was the way to go.

I am careful with the abs, its used well ventilated and the cabinet is a closed cabinet, i might get round to adding a vent directly outdoors from the cabinet sometime.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Work on the cockpit progresses, the areas that contain the cocktail cabinet and helm position are required to be done before the floor, so a wide sheet of teak was selected and narrower pieces for the sides, of course the shapes were awkward

IMG_2577.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so today has been working on the dashboard layout, as you may remember from model 1 i have some miniature switches that look similar to the ones on the real boat, so the dash panel has been cut out for these, now comes the problem, this panel is thicker, so i need to cut recesses to allow the chips to sit deeper into the panel, so they are flush on the outside.

IMG_2578.JPG

IMG_2579.JPG

IMG_2580.JPG

IMG_2581.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oops broke it fitting the switches, split the wood out, so it is being remade with the grain running horizontal rather than vertical, i am just at the filing of the slots stage once more. one has these minor setbacks during a build, so I am not upset.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

For details of our Guidelines, please take a look at the Terms of Use here.