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Above 'that Damned Bridge'


BroadAmbition

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So, late June 2017 I have a fishing trip planned. Five crew onboard 'B.A' (No Macie Dog) for four days afloat.  Our intention is to get 'B.A' through 'That' bridge (I've done it before and I'll jolly well do it again) and spend four days fishing, no doubt visiting a few hostelries as one should whilst we are in that fabled area.  Now then, it's not that often I get 'B.A' up to the higher regions of the Thurne system, so any tips on areas to get our rods out would be much appreciated - And I promise not to public with any guarded hotspots.

Thanks,

Griff

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Griff,

I am the world's most inept fisherman but I do spend quite a lot of time above Potter Heigham bridge.

I have heard that the last Deep Dyke mooring on the left before you enter Hickling Broad is a v good spot ( I suspect all the lovely moorings on the left there are good and they are a fantastic spot for a BBQ , seeing Marsh Harriers and maybe hearing/seeing a Bittern).

I also always see pretty serious looking fishermen on the wild mooring on the right ,more or less opposite that beautiful little property the Holt on Heigham Sound as you head towards Hickling/ Horsey.

I think that there may be one wild mooring suitable for BA on Meadow dyke on the right on the way to Horsey.

Am sure mudweighting on either Hickling or Horsey might be a plan too but don't treat any of this as gospel because I know nothing about fishing, I'm merely passing on observations !!

Best wishes

Charles

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Last week I was at Hickling staying on my boat. I caught a good head of Adnam's bitter with a few small Gin & Tonics. The somewhat rare Southern comfort made a quick appearance along with a surprise Pernod or two. Crisps can be a nuisance this time of the year but if you can get through them there are scratchings feeding below them.

I had a good and productive time overall and next trip I might even take a fishing rod.

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1 hour ago, MauriceMynah said:

Last week I was at Hickling staying on my boat. I caught a good head of Adnam's bitter with a few small Gin & Tonics. The somewhat rare Southern comfort made a quick appearance along with a surprise Pernod or two. Crisps can be a nuisance this time of the year but if you can get through them there are scratchings feeding below them.

I had a good and productive time overall and next trip I might even take a fishing rod.

Wayford is offering some decent sport in the form of prawn and crayfish cocktail. The steak and kidney puddings are certainly gaining weight and put up a fight. In between the odd Adnams I managed to bank two rare Adnams Ghostships. The following day I targeted the liver and bacon over a bed of fresh veg and mash and in a lengthy all nighter managed several more Ghostships and a few Jack Daniels off the top before retiring to the bivvy. Early morning and I drew a peg that responded well to drip fed coffee which eventually resulted in my being able to tackle up for a bonus Full English as I had been targeting the smaller poached egg on toast.

Maurice Mynah and Timbo...not just fishing...Marks and Spencer fishing!

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I had a thought - today seeing a chap Rollerblade past me - then I had a look online and sure enough you can buy the wheel sets.  They are very low profile, and have virtually friction-less bearings.

So it is not past the realms of fantasy that you can put a a pair in line either side of the highest point of a boat - thus the wheel would strike the underside of a bridge first - be pushed down and 'roll' through - despite the high pressure the bearing should hold up. Even if after the event the wheel is no longer free spinning and or damaged, you've have saved more expensive damage to your handrail/cabin tops.

Anyway, just thought I'd use this topic to share this with.

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1 hour ago, LondonRascal said:

 thus the wheel would strike the underside of a bridge first - be pushed down and 'roll' through - despite the high pressure the bearing should hold up. Even if after the event the wheel is no longer free spinning and or damaged, you've have saved more expensive damage to your handrail/cabin tops.

Anyway, just thought I'd use this topic to share this with.

A ceramic hybrid bearing should take the pressure Robin, and doesnt even need to be a high abec rating to do the job either.

Charlie

Edited to add youd need two or three each side to prevent popping up before the aft clears bridge...

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53 minutes ago, grendel said:

Why not mount them on the bridge.

Not all boat profiles are linear for the length of the boat, handrails, windscreen bases, ventilators etc would get crushed.

I think the bridge would take a battering from all the impacts, and may put undue upward  pressure on the odd stone, that might loosen, and eventually the whole bridge would collapse.

 

Ahhh I see Robin's plan now lol...

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I am now going to be a complete hypocrite...

Up to the last few days, I would have supported what ever it takes to keep Potter Heigham bridge as it is, that's because we have always been able to get under "That Bridge" no matter what state of the tide, wind or rain.

However... having removed our Viking 23 from the Broads, our next visit will be on a hire craft, and I want to get under it no matter what.

What are the choices?

Demolish it, go around it, go over it, lower the river and go under it, or my favourite, sell it to the Americans, after all they bought the wrong London bridge lol.

Of course, you could wait until the North sea breaches the dunes at Horsey, then suitable boats can nip out from GT Yarmouth and enter via the breach. Many things spoken in jest, this could actually be a real threat.

Last thought, put it in the Museum of the Broads with all the other relics lol.

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If you can get through, join us. If you can't nature has decreed you stay the other side,

Only Nature didn't decree it should be this way did she?  -  Nope the Ba did that on her behalf when they took over from Gt Yarmouth port authority and stopped dredging the lower Bure.

PHB was constructed in the first instance to allow passage of river traffic.  Then the Wherries came, they were constructed to allow them free passage through PHB.   Then the hire fleets came into being along with a very small number of private craft, most if not all were constructed to get through PHB with ease, the boat builders built them with PHB and the like in mind when they drew their plans up. 

'Broad Ambition' and many other craft were designed and constructed to get through PHB at average low water, they did so for many years with ease and would still do so today if the blessed authority had their priorities in the correct order.   Me and my late Dad used to pilot Broom Admirals through PHB regulary (The Pilots in the 60's and 70's refused to do it for us as he said we were more than capable) try getting a 7ft craft through here nowadays - yes it is possible but rare and more than likely you won't get back any time soon.

So the way I see it we have three, nope make that four options:-

1)  Get the Ba to re-commence dredging the lower Bure - Cat in hells chance

2)  Raise PHB to give the same airdraft as the bypass bridge.  This is not as difficult as it sounds.  If the Yanks can purchase London Bridge, dismantle it, transport it across the Atlantic then reassemble it, we can raise PHB by a single foot or so

3)  Dig a cut between Sutton 'Broad' (Yeah, well it used to be a Broad till the Ba abandoned looking after it) and Catfield Common, yes I know that three bridges will be required, what's another three in the grand scheme of things

4)  Do nothing, let the RSPB take over the water above PHB, close the bridge permanently to all river traffic

Rant - NOT over

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Fishing Hotpsots - Tks for tips - Noted

More welcome

-------------------------------------------------------------

Robin - many a true word spoken in jest

 

Griff

 

 

 

 

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the answer is simple, put a lock in, it worked for the canals over 200 years ago, given modern technology and techniques

it would be a piece of pi........sorry easy to do! All you would need is a prefabricated concrete caisson sunk into place just like they are doing on the thameslink project to keep the stations from flooding, extend 45 feet either side of the bridge, a set of gates at each end and a decent pump - viola!! done! :clap

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Option 5.  A canal that runs from the side of the pilots office, under the road and back onto the main river just where the willow tree is. Put in a two way lock (like the one at Oulton broad) to stop any significant change in tidal effect and salt incursion. Phoenix pilots to operate locks so's to not take any financial hit. Simples, and only one bridge to build.

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