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LondonRascal

Rascal's Learning to Drive

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I have had instantaneous blowouts 3 times now, and both times was glad to have a spare. one I was forced into a pothole which blew the tyre, , one was on the motorway, meaning I was all over 3 lanes,  one was semi gradual, allowing me to slow to a stop on the hard shoulder. I cringe when I see some cars travelling the motorways with almost flat tyres. 

I have also had a horsebox blow a tyre in front of me as I overtook it, it was halfway into my lane in a matter of a fraction of a second. I would seriously advocate having a full sized spare, I could swap mine out for a full alloy tyre if I put the steel rim spare onto my old car, the allow wouldnt match the rest, but would be the same size, if you have to drive more than a few yards on a flat, it will destroy the tyre, and maybe the rim.

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Actually Ford are very good about full size spares. Unfortunately you have to normally buy the bottom of the range to get one and then load the car with extras.

Top end models normally have a BO stereo in the bit where the wheel goes or big wheels and low profile tyres.

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5 minutes ago, LondonRascal said:

underfloor area has been altered no longer to accommodate a spare wheel but (with most BMW cars) is where the battery is now fitted. 

my volvo has the battery under the floor at the back, and a full sized spare.

5 minutes ago, LondonRascal said:

While ‘tyre emergency repair foam’ might not be for all, it will bung up the hole and inflate the tyre even if it also renders the tyre unrepairable in the process it allows you to still drive - somewhere. 

in all of the 3 blowouts I had above, the emergency foam would not have sealed the hole, I could put my hand through 2 of them.

if your tyre shreds and the rim is damaged, they may not be able to fit a new tyre onto it, where would you be then, in my pothole incident that would have left me on a narrow country road, between two blind bends.

the only reason they dont put spares into cars nowadays is to reduce weight (and cost to produce), this increases the power to weight ratio, and allows the vehicle to actually achieve some of the rated economy that they claim for it.

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11 minutes ago, LondonRascal said:

But so few cars now come with them. Try buying a Ford with a spare for example, an Audi or a BMW. Now some you could buy a spare wheel and put in but increasingly the underfloor area has been altered no longer to accommodate a spare wheel but (with most BMW cars) is where the battery is now fitted. 

So, I don’t doubt what you say but it would be hard to continue to have (or should I say store) a spare wheel on modern vehicles. 

While ‘tyre emergency repair foam’ might not be for all, it will bung up the hole and inflate the tyre even if it also renders the tyre unrepairable in the process it allows you to still drive - somewhere. 

Sorry Robin that is just what it will not do. Modern lower profile and certainly very low profile tyres more often than not fail on the side wall and foam will just not work.

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I think that once you have been driving a while and experienced a few punctures, you may well reconsider this Robin, if there wasnt a dedicated space for a full sized spare in any car I owned, it would be sitting in the boot.

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On my last Saab I got 3 spare alloy rims off of Ebay one to replace the space saver and the other two I had winter tyres fitted.

Like many of the forum members I always have a full sized spare.

Regards

Alan

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If you have a spare in the boot, please ensure it's well strapped down, preferably to somewhere solid. In an accident it will become a (very heavy) missile.

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On ‎22‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 08:34, MauriceMynah said:

Robin,

 Over the years that booklet changes which is why every driver should purchase one each time there is a new addition. (I wonder how many drivers actually do that though.) 

.

or just read it online then it's always up to date...

https://www.gov.uk/browse/driving/highway-code-road-safety

PS, I won't have a car without a full size spare either, having had an exhaust sized hole punched in a tyre, a six inch nail through a new landrover tyre ( on the A140 Boundary road junction!!), and several others over the years that a mere can of gunk wouldn't fix. As for space savers, the cost of a duff tyre when 400 miles from home at night with no tyre place open is just not worth the risk.

 

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Another convert to the full sized spare gang! Mine came with a full size spare on a matching alloy all neatly tucked away in the boot floor with associated jack and tools.

 

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thats another point worth noting, if you do carry a spare, a jack and spanner to change the wheel are another essential (and another weight saving thing car companies do away with to save costs and weight.)

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All my vehicles have always carried a full size spare, apart from the Dutton Phaeton - Tin of foam, nowhere to carry a spare and of course the Mighty Tiger

Griff

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48 minutes ago, BroadAmbition said:

All my vehicles have always carried a full size spare, apart from the Dutton Phaeton - Tin of foam, nowhere to carry a spare and of course the Mighty Tiger

Griff

A good blow out on the tiger at speed Griff, especially on the front and you probably might not care how you get home. Ride with care!

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Good choice of car  Robin I’ve had 2  X5s   A bit big again though for parking up especially in the multi story car parks.!

Hope you’ve gone for run flats Robin as these now (they were very noisy when they first came out) are great if not bloody expensive now.

BMW usually change the tyres on  used cars if the trend is below 5mm as standard when buying from them.

I have had a puncture a few times on these and been able to carry on my journey around Norfolk all be it at a recommended 50mph. I definatly wouldn’t put standard tyres on if you are driving around on dark nights even with a full size spare you wouldnt want to be changing them on our pitch black roads at night.

whats with the ad blue I have the same 3lt engine in a 3 series bmw touring but don’t need to use it. I thought bmw had an extra bit in the exhaust so you didn’t need it (unless that’s later models?)

John

 

 

 

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My van doesn't have a spare but does have a electric pump with a built in can of foam, So having had a slow rear I had to by a electric pump as the van one is a one hit wonder.

Shop round for tyre's last month Michelin had a great deal running with cash back from them and I think it's running in January but Costco was still the cheapest for us as always with nitrogen in them. It pays for the years membership and if one near you does fuel that's cheaper as well.

Note - when you hear a clicking as you drive, that will be a No 8 pozi in one of the tyres.

 

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A bit of fun whilst watching the video in finding a private reg around your name, LR rascal etc even blue buoy, but nearest I can get is

image.png.4984d02939512156883b5d3a03739670.png

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that said, if you ever do get a screw or nail in a tyre - leave it in until you can get the tyre either replaced or repaired, if you pull it out, then the air will leak faster, plus the tyre repair place will be able to find the hole easier, and you will do less damage to the hole, so it may be able to be properly plugged. whether it can be plugged depends on the angle it goes into the tyre.

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I would worry more about having a diesel engine, than not having a spare wheel !

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at least a diesel engine can be run on vegetable oil when the petrochemicals run out.

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Buying a car with out a spare is nuts... That’s the first thing I look for...  

secondly I carry a foot pump and tyre stringer with gunk and string.. and a can of 30mph can of tyre moose as a very last resort... I really don’t like using that stuff because you can not run the tyre at the correct tyre pressure it over inflates so basically the tyre is knackered and not much of them can be MTR...

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All BMW’s should have run flat tyres fitted  which allows you  to still drive up to 50mph if you have a puncture so no need for a spare. 

 

John

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1 hour ago, Jbx5 said:

All BMW’s should have run flat tyres fitted  which allows you  to still drive up to 50mph if you have a puncture so no need for a spare. 

 

John

But when bmw deliver a demo car to you with a puncture their drivers are not allowed to drive them!!! It had to be recovered. Doesn’t give you much confidence in them  

Personally I hate run flats.

 

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Hi Mark

I think there great apart from the price !

They have got me out a pickle twice at night  and got sorted the day after when the  tyre shops are open.

John

 

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Run flats have been around for many decades earlier design was an inner bead fitted in after the bottom bead of the tyre was put on the wheel.. this stopped the tyre from shredding and coming off the wheel and keeping control of the car...

It was designed by Avon tyres it was called the Avon safety wheel... The first Vehicle it was fitted to was a Vauxhall Frenza...

The problem now is that once a run flat has been ran at high speed and over distance results with tyre being put over stress is it being weak and knackered..

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2 hours ago, Victoryv said:

I would worry more about having a diesel engine, than not having a spare wheel !

Dont get me wrong about diesel engines, I do think they have their place, in boats !

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27 minutes ago, ScrumpyCheddar said:

It was designed by Avon tyres it was called the Avon safety wheel... The first Vehicle it was fitted to was a Vauxhall Frenza...

They had the Dunlop denovo (or something like that) as well. didn't they get put on the mini 1275gt as standard?Different concept with the foam already inside in little cylinders. They were bloody horrible on the  1275gt and no where could fit them. 

I don’t like minis either for some reason. Great concept, but not for me. 

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