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History of the Dog Inn - Ludham


NorfolkNog

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Hi All

I’m trying to find some info about the history of the Dog Inn. Looking at the Norfolk pubs database it looks to date back at least 200 years.

http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkl/ludham/ludhdi.htm

Like many pubs it has been extended many times over the years and I would love to find out which bit is the original pub and when the various extensions were added. Attached is an aerial photo (sorry about the flash burn) and one of the pub as it is now. I am guessing the original part is possibly the section in the middle with the chimney at each end but could be wrong.

Any ideas would be appreciated.

cheersbar

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i googled and found this

Licensees :

WILLIAM KING

age 33 in 1851

& carrier 1846 - * 1851

JAMES GAFFER

& shopkeeper 1854 - 1858

SAMUEL BUNN 1861

Mrs CHARLOTTE BUNN

( Mrs Sarah Bunn 1877 ) 1865 - 1881

Mrs ANN BUNN 1883

GEORGE COX

& boatman 1888 - 1892

THOMAS SMITH 1896 - 1908

WILLIAM GEORGE TEMPLE 1912

THOMAS CHARLES LONG 1916

....... ELLIS 1922

RICHARD BASIL GEARY 1925

FRANCES ELIZABETH GEARY 1929 to 1938

Fine of £1 for selling out of hours - 13.10.1930

ALBERT HANNENT 10.01.1938

RONALD FREDERICK LESLIE WICKS 24.01.1938

PERCY EDGAR RUSH 01.05.1961

PETER JOHN BRANDISH 10.07.1961

ALBERT EDWARD BRANDISH 28.10.1963

to at least 02.1974

.

JUDI & BRIAN LAWTON c1978

JOHN ANDREWS 1980 - 1985

ALAN R. MONK 25.11.1985

-

ADRIAN ILLINGWORTH June 2002

.......................................

Mary Thaxter was buried in 1689 she was said to have lived

at the `Dog House '

Appears on Bryants 1826 map.

1938 advertisement :-

`Ah! Here's the house the Yachtsmen cried,

and soon the boys were all inside'.

The sign in 1968 was based upon a cartoon character.

( Does anybody have a photograph of that sign? )

See page 39 of The Norfolk Broads in Old Postcards, first published 1990, by Basil Gowen.

A freehouse from 1989.

........................................

http://www.norfolkpubs.co.uk/norfolkl/ludham/ludhdi.htm

and a picture here ...

http://cavendishart.com/image/the_dog_i ... -23291.php

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  • 1 month later...

Hi All

Sorry about the delay in replying. I have only just been alerted to this thread. I don't look in here very often.

I can't add a lot to the history of the Dog above that which has been covered so far. The Ludham Archive has got quite a good picture by Pop Snelling (author of a couple of books about Ludham history) and there is a map in the Records Office in Norwich showing The Dog. However as the map is dated 1912 it does not add much. However, it does show the road junction as "The Dog Corner" and the road which we call Hall Road as "Dog Inn Road" This is handwritten so it may well reflect what the locals called it at the time.

Best wishes

Nigel

Chairman, Ludham Community Archive Group

www.ludhamarchive.org.uk

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Hey Howard, WOW! Thank you so much for starting this thread, As we were discussing the last time you were in The Dog, I would be thrilled to have some idea of the history of the pub. There are so many additions to the building, the older of them done so well that it is difficult to decide which bit is the original. I suspect that the original building is the part which faces onto the road, a/ this would make sense as the house looks out over How Hill and the marshes, and also due to the layout of the rafters in the roof, and some sloping ceilings upstairs in this part. (Is this making sense?) I then think the 2nd build is the main bar areas, facing over the camp site, and the 3rd build being the back of the bar & cellar behind.

There are lots of small additions, ie the dining room, entrance hall with stairs to upstairs, and back of the kitchen which all appear old, then the newer bits, (loos, games room, bar extension, corridor) which are obviously more recent.

It is very exciting to see on Nigel's post that there has been an Inn here since 1689, and if anyone else can add to what has been found so far I would love to hear. I have spent many hours trawling the 'net trying to find info, with very little luck!

cheers all

Lorraine

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Hi Lorraine

As you say, there seems to be little information out there about The Dog Inn. It gets the odd mention so we know it was there but nobody seems to have bothered to photograph it or to write down anything that went on there. Maybe the building itself is the best guide as the history must be written into the brickwork.

Pop Snelling's book "Ludham, A Norfolk Village 1800 - 1900" ISBN 0 9535293 0 4 (Joan M Snelling) mentions The Dog in a number of places. It seems that in the 19th century there were far less buildings between the Inn and the medieval Ludham Bridge and it was probably a quiet place. However, it was on the main road and near to Ludham Hall. I suspect Hall Road was more important in the past. It was an enclosure road, wide with areas of grazing at the sides.

You can track the innkeepers and families from the census records but this only goes back as far as 1841.

It is possible that Pop Snelling has more information. She is still alive and lives in France now. You could write to her as she takes a keen interest in Ludham still. Have you spoken to Beulah Gowing on the subject? If not, I can ask her next time I see her in the village.

The Ludham Archive would be interested in any information you can find.

Best wishes

Nigel

Ludham

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  • 1 month later...

I have just routed out this photo at the request of some of the descendants in it.

It was taken in May 1955, the group (or their 'replacements') have been holidaying on the Broads together since at least 1955, and are back this week.

All great Real Ale drinkers, we know them as 'The Bankers'. They are coming back in tonight, so will ask for more history of their existance.

Nigel, how would I get in touch with Pop Snelling?

If you could talk to Beaulah Gowing I would be most grateful.

Must go now, but will add to this post when I have more time.

Thanks for your interest

Lorraine

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Lorraine

I will get Pop Snelling's address and send it to you.

Next time I see Beulah, I will find out what she knows. Her father was the landlord of the King's Arms during the war and so they, no doubt, knew about the goings on at The Dog.

Can I have a copy of the picture for the Ludham Archive please? Any others you may have would also be appreciated.

By the way. If somebody tries to leave a mop with you for me to collect, I don't actually want it so it is yours.

Nigel

Ludham

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By the way. If somebody tries to leave a mop with you for me to collect, I don't actually want it so it is yours

Is this some kind of secret code? All very cloak and dagger! :lol:

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Lorraine

By the way. If somebody tries to leave a mop with you for me to collect, I don't actually want it so it is yours.

Nigel

Ludham

Sounds very mysterious! However, donations are always welcome! :grin: However strange!!!!

Do you want an email copy Nigel? I have the original, which was a bit damaged, so I repaired it best I could. One of the original crew from 1955 were back in last night, along with around 24 others, so had a bit of a chat with him. (See above post).

Thanks for your efforts with helping the research.

You are correct about the history being in the building, but I haven't managed to steel myself to get up in the loft for a proper poke around as yet. (It's a female thing...)

Lorraine

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I have just routed out this photo at the request of some of the descendants in it.

It was taken in May 1955, the group (or their 'replacements') have been holidaying on the Broads together since at least 1955, and are back this week.

All great Real Ale drinkers, we know them as 'The Bankers'. They are coming back in tonight, so will ask for more history of their existance.

Nigel, how would I get in touch with Pop Snelling?

If you could talk to Beaulah Gowing I would be most grateful.

Must go now, but will add to this post when I have more time.

Thanks for your interest

Lorraine

Ah, couldn't edit the original post.

I had a chat with a few of the guys last night, one of whom was also in the 1955 group.

They have been visiting the Broads every year (excepting the WW2 years) since 1926, '27 or '28 (Some dispute here). They have hired Herbert Woods sailing boats ever since Woods started, from Womack Staithe. Woods hadn't actually started up when the Bitter Boys first started, so hired elsewhere in the first year(s).

Originally it was a group of men from Lloyds of London, hence them being known as 'The Bankers' to us, although the invitation has in later years spread to others, and they now come from far & wide, and various backgrounds. It also passes on father to son.

Their actual 'group' name was 'The Bitter Boys', as is written on the back of the original photograph, due to them only drinking real ale. No other drinks are allowed (not in the pubs, anyway). They do take ice back to the boats for their G & T's though!

They have a syndicate going, where they save so much per week to pay for their holiday, and they always visit the first weekend after the early May bank holiday, for a week.

Anyway, they are a very well-mannered bunch of gentlemen, of all ages, who quaff a huge amount of ale between them, and are full of stories about their years on the Broads.

Apparently we have a goat buried on the field "somewhere", which the landlady of the time had a ceremony around the grave for! A 'whip' back around 1955 was £5, and it cost less than £3 per person for the weeks holiday!

The guys had another photograph taken yesterday, in the same spot as the original, so I will post that up on here when I receive it, and it will join the old picture on the wall in the bar.

Afraid I can't remember any more at the moment, but maybe one of them will come across this and add their own input.

cheers

Lorraine.

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Hi Lorraine

No need to post the picture, I can simply copy it from this site. However, if you have any other pictures which could be added to the Archive, could you please send them to enquiries@ludhamarchive.org.uk. Thank you very much for this and for the interesting information. I will get back to you with more information as requested.

The mop is not any sort of code. It will be obvious when it turns up. Maybe not for another couple of weeks.

Best wishes

Nigel

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What a great thread this is - and nice story Lorraine. I look forward to reading more information as it becomes available so I hope you two will keep the thread updated!

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  • 3 months later...

It's just come to my notice that an old family friend's father ran the Dog for many years from around 1938 into the sixties. His son (name of Wicks) has many memories of the pub and the area, and if research is still going on, he may well be willing to discuss his memories and perhaps could shed further light on the research. Please let me know if there's any interest.

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Today, I was looking through a collection of cine film we have recently been given. I found some quite good quality footage taken inside the Dog at Christmas 1973. It is quite short but it is significant from a history point of view.

The film needs to be converted to a digital format and this will take a while. There is loads more taken all over The Broads. Most of it I have not even looked at yet.

Brian - the Ludham Archive website is www.ludhamarchive.org.uk

Nigel

Ludham

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  • 2 years later...

I’ve managed to get hold of a small number of old slides from the former Mrs Nog and came across this view of the Dog Inn. I can’t be exactly sure of the date but believe it will be from the mid to late seventies. You can see the old Watney’s style signage above the door. Also notice that the entrance is still in the old position (not at the side as now). The old door has now been bricked up but if you look carefully you can just see its outline in the rendering of the current frontage. The fenestration is different too looking much the same as Lorraine’s postcard from 1955.

The extract fan is still there in the same position. I can’t make out the landlords name above the door but looking at the Norfolk pubs database for the period, I’m guessing it could be Judi and Brian James Lawton. Note the metal tables and chairs outside the pub which were very typical of this period.

I can’t remember much about the beer but in those days it probably would have been the dreaded Norwich bitter!!!

cheersbar

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Im wondering if they have much of a problem with keeping their cellars dry like 'The Ferry' at Horning do, or as part of their extentions and alterations over the years, did they move from having a traditional cellar, once thought of as essential for keeping real ales in top condition before the days of advanced cooling systems, to a more raised ground floor beer store away from the risk of flooding?

On chatting to the warden at the neighbouring Broadlands CC site, he told me that the water table there was only 2 inches below the surface, and they never needed to water the grass even in the height of a dry summer, and constant waterlogging was common during the winter months, forcing them to close.

I know that most cellars were 'tanked' with pitch mastic to keep out dampness, but I would doubt that even this would tackle and be able to keep up with such problems in a regularly flooded area, it wouldnt be long before the bricks would start to perish and crumble, especially if they were not of the traditional 'slate blues' or 'engineering' bricks varieties as used to build the structures along the canals and inland man made waterways.

That extention facard pictured above, looks rather 'art decco' in style to me, although its windowframes look as though they may be of metal construction, which were in vogue with the Building trade during the 50s and early 60s, and were Bu**ers at breaking the window panes in cold weather when the metal contracted, hence they soon fell out of favour and were replaced by the more traditional wooden frames :naughty:

Julz :wave

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That's a good picture of The Dog. Please can we have a copy for the Ludham Archive?

I am sorry we have not been able to come up with much history for The Dog. For some reason there seems to be very little written stuff and even fewer pictures. Maybe we are not looking in the right place. If anything turns up I will post it on here.

Nigel

Ludham

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