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B.A. Policy on Residential Craft


jillR

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Houseboats and Residential Craft

Houseboats and boats used as permanent dwellings

The Broads has status equivalent to a national park, and part of the Broads Authority's responsibility is to maintain both the landscape beauty and the conservation value of the area. The Broads is a popular area for visitors, who come to enjoy its special qualities and character, and for those who live and work here. The value that both visitors and residents make to the local community is valued.

Because of its special qualities, people sometimes wish to combine living in The Broads with an enjoyment of the water, and ask about living on a boat.

Experience shows that the appearance of houseboats and residential craft, together with the associated use of the river bank, can sometimes be damaging to the character and appearance of The Broads. Residential use of boats also tends to create a demand for facilities that are often inappropriate in a rural riverside setting, such as provision of water and pump-out facilities, or boardwalks to provide safe footing on soft ground. There is also an increased risk of pollution, particularly if these facilities are not provided, and damage or disturbance to wildlife. Given the special character and importance of The Broads, it is considered that the use of residential craft is inappropriate unless these problems can be avoided.

Current planning policy on residential moorings

The permanent mooring of a residential houseboat is development that requires planning permission. Our planning policies do not currently permit any further houseboats or the use of craft for residential purposes. There are a number of existing houseboats within The Broads that have been established over a number of years, with concentrations in locations including Horning, Hickling, Wayford Bridge and Oulton Broad. Some of these are particularly intrusive and we will continue to seek their removal. This is normally done by negotiating their removal, possibly to a less intrusive location. We will also take prompt and effective action where there is use of a residential boat without planning permission, and this may result in enforcement action or a prosecution.

Review of development policies

Our development policies, including those relating to new residential moorings, are currently under review as part of the preparation of our Development Policies DPD. The review is considering the possibility that in future, new residential moorings may be permitted in limited circumstances where all the above issues and other sustainability matters are adequately addressed. No change in policy is planned until the Development Policies DPD is adopted, sometime in 2010. Until that time, the existing restrictive policy, as set out in the Broads Local Plan, will continue to be applied.

It should be noted that the Broads Authority does not plan to provide residential moorings and is not compiling a waiting list for moorings. In the event that any new policy is adopted, it will be up to boat or land owners to provide a site and apply for planning permission, demonstrating that the requirements of that new policy are met.

For more information on the policy review and preparation of the Development Policies DPD, contact the Planning Policy Officer on 01603 610734 or by email to: LDF@broads-authority.gov.uk.

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There was a rather crucial word there, in the 3rd paragraph, "sometimes", it was uttered, and then the diatribe continued, without making any further concessions that houseboats aren't always an eyesore.

Sure, there are plenty of scruffy ones about, but it doesn't mean they all are. On the similar topography of the Thames, There are many very picturesque examples, which don't detract from the riverside scene at all.

Surely there's a happy medium somewhere, where their location and upkeep could be tightly controlled, without the BA's rather draconian "no new houseboats", anywhere on the Broads.

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There is plenty of room on the broads for everyone,there is nothing wrong with the majority of people who chose to live aboard theircboat,I have met some lovely people who live on their boats,sadly however there is a few who spoil it for the others,the BA should deal with those issues seperately,not tar everyone with the same brush.

So called local do gooders having their say again,sorry they probably think they are local,but buy a 2nd property on the broads and think they are local.

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"some of the live-aboard boats on the Broads are awful, appalling eyesores"

some but not many

some ressys are really up against it, trying to repair and keep ship shape while being shunted from pillar to post with no back up home base, and they are usually the ones that get highlighted. poor peeps.

ive seen some eyesore houses to ........

i presume the BA are scared to sanction residential boating for fear of the onus of providing facilities.

on the canals, there are many locks with good facilities but this isnt the case here and a slightly

different approach is needed.

on the whole, residentials are fairly self sufficient and can manage well without mod cons and if yards were

able to accept them, residentials who wanted more could have a base.

im sure there are many boatyards that are more than happy to welcome a percentage of residential boats.

with modern technology, it gets easier to live aboard with no worry about damaging the environment.

modern products such as bio cleaning products and

composting loos.

the canals have a much harder job accommodating residentials due to the narrow water ways and they manage.

we have marinas failing every year. how many could have been saved if they could have taken residential boats?

what is the definition of a house boat on the broads?

isnt it a vessel without an engine?

http://www.rboa.org.uk/

jill

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Broads Authority Notice.

A new officer to deal with unauthorised moorings.

Enforcement officer John Coles has been appointed to investigate

the increasing number of people living on boats on unauthorised moorings,

abandoned vessels and unauthorised riverside development on the Broads.

The role is funded for two years by

the Planning Delivery Grant and is currently focussing

on Thorpe Island and Haddiscoe Cut.

If a satisfactory resolution is not

achieved by negotiation then the use

of enforcement action will require

boats to move within a given time.

If the owner still does not comply John may then apply to the Planning Committee

to take direct action to remove the boat and recover costs.

john coles

post-115-136713666947_thumb.jpg

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL

It`s a shame they don`t adopt that sort of heavy handed approach to illegal immigrants who support anti British tterrorist groups.

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Guest Paul t

It`s a shame they don`t adopt that sort of heavy handed approach to illegal immigrants who support anti British tterrorist groups.

I really do despair!! And where is your evidence for this ridiculous assertion?

Let me guess,the err Daily M...

Ah well no surprises there then!

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hi paul

I really do despair!! And where is your evidence for this ridiculous assertion?

in 1997 when i attended the appeal meeting for the broads local plan

policy H 10 "no residential boat use on the broads"

clive wren rboa sat on one side of the table and half a dozen BA officers sat on the other openly laughing and jeering.

clive did manage to get the wording changed to "no further residential use"

that image has stayed with me all these years and i have seen little to show a change of attitude.

but i live in hope

jill

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Press Release March 25th 2010

For Immediate Release

Thorpe Islanders Form Residents Association To Fight Moves To Evict Residential Boaters

In view of a fresh moves by the Broads Authority to stop anyone living on a boat on the Norfolk Broads, the residents of Thorpe Island have come together to form a Residents Association. The aim of the Thorpe Island Residents Association is to protect their interests and to encourage the responsible use of Thorpe Island.

In the first meeting of the Thorpe Island Resident's Association on Thursday March 18th, Jason Hales was elected as Chairman, and Nick South was elected as Secretary.

Jason Hales said:

We became aware that The Broads Authority have appointed an 'Enforcement Officer' (John Coles), funded for 2 years by the Planning Delivery Grant. We were delighted when we first discovered the Broads Authority had secured government money to fund a 2 year project, to appoint someone to 'research' and 'work with' people living on their boats.

Appointing an Enforcement Officer contradicts the positive approach we were led to believe the Authority was taking. To prevent any misunderstanding, we have asked the Broads Authority to clarify the new appointment and the brief for the government money given to fund the project.

The Broad Sheet reports John's priorities to be Thorpe Island and Haddiscoe Cut. In view of this, we have established a Thorpe Island Residents Association, to focus on the good of the island. The issue of liveaboards on the North side of the island is not new, it is in fact historic. We are a small community who adds to the diversity of Norwich. We have an established infrastructure and contribute to the local economy.

We are unclear as to the Authorities intentions and have written to them requesting clarification. Whilst we are keen to work with the Authority, we fear their authoritarian approach is cause for concern and may restrict good working relations

Thorpe Island Residents Association

More information on this story is available on request

..............................................................................................

Contact Details of the Chair and Secretary can be obtained from me via PM.

jill

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Whilst I totally agree with nearly everything said on this thread, I think the BA SHOULD do something about sites like this:-

post-699-136713671982_thumb.jpg

Obviously not a 'live-aboard' any more, but I am surprised its still there. (Oulton Broad)

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hi lucky

that particular picture brings memories back for me

in 1997 when i attended the broads local plan appeal against the proposed out right ban of residential boating .....

clive wren from the rboa was sat on one side of the table of power and half a dozen BA execs were sat on the other.

i was sat in the audience next to the lady who lived on that house boat.

she was a fysty pretty young blond girl who was the 1st female student at rugby public school.

i spent the 1st half hour trying to keep her calm as the BA loudly laughed and jeared, i poped out to the loo and when i came

back all was quiet.

coffee break was interesting :lol:

jill

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I'd liked to have seen that Jill !!

Any ideas whats on the cards for this old houseboat and the other few here in Oulton Broad. My view is that if they are being used (and I'm not going to get into an arguement about how many days a year = being used) AND they are kept to a reasonable standard then there is no problem with them - pretty much the view of most people that have commented on them.

But, if like this one, they fall into dis-repair then they should be removed. Obviously there would have to be letters sent to the owner etc, which I'm guessing would have been done in this instance, but looking at the state of it surely the BA could of done something about it by now.... its obviously not been looked after for years.

I remember the year before last, one of these houseboats lost its moorings during a storm and ended up bashing the side a bit further down. I don't know what happened to it in the end, but I'm pretty sure its not been towed back to its original place....

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I would imagine there is a planning situation here, I would think that if this houseboat were to be removed then planning permission would be needed to put it back. This could be a lengthy process which may not end in permission being granted, so the planning has a value even if the houseboat doesn't.

I demolished a building a few years ago but left the walls 1metre high, this was for similar reasons.

BUT, regarding the houseboat on OB I could be wrong.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 2 weeks later...
"some of the live-aboard boats on the Broads are awful, appalling eyesores"

some but not many

on the canals, there are many locks with good facilities but this isnt the case here and a slightly

different approach is needed.

on the whole, residentials are fairly self sufficient and can manage well without mod cons and if yards were

able to accept them, residentials who wanted more could have a base.

im sure there are many boatyards that are more than happy to welcome a percentage of residential boats.

with modern technology, it gets easier to live aboard with no worry about damaging the environment.

modern products such as bio cleaning products and

composting loos.

the canals have a much harder job accommodating residentials due to the narrow water ways and they manage.

jill

I was on the canals for 20 odd years as a cruising boat but there are many residential boats acrosss the system. There are those that continually cruise and have no home mooring and there are those on residential moorings. Many of the big marinas on the canals set aside a certain number of berths for residential craft - it makes a lot of sense both in terms of income and marina security. Maybe the Broads should follow this "marina" model - I don't favour the continuous cruising option as the boats clog up temporary moorings and the Broads do not have the infrastructure to cope.

Colin

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I would be the first to agree there are some eyesores out there but outlawing living on a boat, due to a minority of "carefree" boat dwellers is in my view a step in the wrong direction, instead of branding the scruff tubs as eyesores why not encourage or help the owners bring them to an acceptable condition by offering them the possibilty of a permanant residential mooring, it gets the eyesores of the river and removes the reason why they fall into disrepair as they have no where permanamt where repairs and maintenance can be carried out.

with a permanant mooring you have a base, access to shops, work, schools, doctors, library, schools, dentist, optician and somewhere to keep your car.

If Marina's were likely to get permission for a set percentage of thier mooring capacity to be set aside for residential use, each mooring could have a parking bay, a paved area and a shed, wheely bins etc, for the things you cannot find a home for and a supply of services, then the benefits could be numerous and not just to the boater but to the boatyard and the local economy.

The Marina would provide safe waste disposal and the delivery of services in a safe manner, water supply, electricity, gas, telephone / broadband much the same way as caravan and residential parks do on land.

the benefits to the local economy are that residential boaters would then pay rates, water wates, spend thier money locally, and the Marinas would "self police" the appearance and local environs by setting standards of apearance and conditions within the rental agreement much the same as a landlord or caravan site does now.

The boatyards could choose to provide other amenities such as laundrette, BBq area, play area's as well as the usual boatyard repair and maintenance facilities and by adding value to the mooring through "residential use" adds a premium to the mooring fee for the boatyard increasing revenue.

The rboa and the thorpe residents assosiation would get a leg up if they could encourage some of the boatyard owners to come up with proposals that those two groups could support and a symbiotic attack could move things in the right direction, I wish you every success and I hope the NIMBY's could be persuaded to take thier blinkers off and look at the bigger picture

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I would be the first to agree there are some eyesores out there but outlawing living on a boat, due to a minority of "carefree" boat dwellers is in my view a step in the wrong direction, instead of branding the scruff tubs as eyesores why not encourage or help the owners bring them to an acceptable condition by offering them the possibilty of a permanant residential mooring, it gets the eyesores of the river and removes the reason why they fall into disrepair as they have no where permanamt where repairs and maintenance can be carried out.

Fair point, but the water gypsy type tend to suffer from a shortage of funds (or a proprtion of them do). How do you envisiage encouraging/helping them? What do we do if they won't be encouraged or can't afford to pay to moor on a residential mooring.

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Unlike a non residential boat mooring a residential mooring would carry the same benefit rights to those on low incomes which is not nececerily just the "Gypsy types"

people on low wages, retirement income living on a proper residential mooring would be able to apply for housing benefit and council tax benefit in the same as they would if they lived in, or on a rented property but would obviously be a lot less in monetary terms.

Removing the "excuse" for the untidiness, providing a sustainable environment where the eco system is protected, the amenity of the area is maintanable by the boat dweller and policed by the boat yard, removes the burden of policing from the BA, provides an environment where a reasonable "quality of life" can be expected, all of these can only provide a benefit for the broads.

As an alternative, some people may well prefer to continually cruise and spend a few days on thier home mooring before cruising again for a few days and may well suit the retired or semi retired but its not possible to do that if you have to go to work 5 days a week or if you need to get the kids to school, so providing residential mooring facilities of this type will help those that need it.

as I say sometimes its a lifestyle choice and sometimes some are more "carefree" with the environment and impact on the civic amenities than others, and if to protect the broads from this minority element of the liveaboard community then its only right and proper that a sustainable and realistic alternative is offered before eviction,

if that offer is then rejected by an individual then it is plain to all including a judge that regrettably enforced removal is the only remaining option. and even the most liberal of us (that could be me) could not defend them any further

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