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Moosey

A Week On Whisper Emblem

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That means you could have asked the copper to follow you into the parlour where you could have shot him on the range.

Exciting times 1974.

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Though we have central heating, we very very rarely use it, our place is timber framed, single glazed and built in the 1700’s.

the kitchen is warmed by the cooker, the bedrooms and bathroom are never heated anyway, and the living room is heather using a log fire which provides more than enough heat for the rest of the place, most of my logs are free as my dad owns a farm, so out heating bills are pretty cheap. We do like our hot water though!

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Day 2.  1st October

 

Up about 5.30am after a terrible nights sleep.  Whisper has to be the loudest boat we have ever stayed on.  Not much sleep was had last night due to the noise of waves splashing against the bow, bloop, bloop, bang, bang, bloop!!!

 

Gav makes us bacon butties for breakfast and we tidy up the boat a bit.  Thank goodness for paper plates saves on the washing up (this boat stores all the waste water onboard and we are not yet sure how big the tank is).  I ring YYS at 8.20 am and leave an answerphone message.  20 minutes later we get a call back from a really helpful guy who says it's 8’6” and dropping so we can come anytime.

 

Hair still wet from the shower I quickly dry it off and forget about straightening it (one of the best things about this boat is that I can use my GHDs onboard)!  Off we go!  We leave on electric and it a weird feeling, sailing along completely silently.


 

We cruise along pretty uneventfully, it quite quiet out there, the generator kicks in at The Stracey Arms and we are back to running on diesel, it was fully charged when we left so it appears you really don't get long on electric.  Phone YYS from Marina Keys, we are still ok to cross, we give the quay attendant a wave on our way past.  We are struggling to make 5mph and the battery charge is dropping like a stone even with the generator running.  

 

Off Breydon and we put the oven on ready for pie in a can.  I eat half of mine whilst travelling but Gav wants to wait until we moor at St Olaves.  We are still struggling to make 5mph and it turns out this will be a problem that will continue all week.  Finally we moor at St OIaves at the free moorings, the battery is down to 50% charge.  

 

We eat our lunch with the generator running and plan tomorrow.  We have booked a mooring at the Waveney River Center and decide it might be better to moor under the bridge.  Gav is convinced there are public moorings so we miss a spot at The Bell to go looking for them.  The moorings are not where he thinks they are so we turn round and go back to The Bell.  The tide is running fast and we moor between a Richardsons bath tub and a private boat.  Fair play to Gav it is a perfect parking maneuver, we finish tying up but I can't finish the last rope as the private boat is leaving and it will get in his way.  They seem to be struggling with the tide and he re ties up and starts again.  I ask if he would like any help but he refuses.  We watch with interest they inch closer and closer to our boat, please don't hit us, they don't!

 

We wander up to the pub to find out that they close early on a Sunday, so we book dinner for 5.30pm.  After a little walk we go back to the boat for a little cider up top.  The noise from the bow is unbelievable and the wind is picking up so we decide to give turning the boat a go.  We manage to get her turned and tuck Whisper into a corner nestled against the reeds.

 

It's just us and the Richardsons boat overnight and I think we sit next to them over what turns out to be a very nice dinner.  The Big Bell Burger for Gav and the Halloumi and Mushroom Burger for me, followed by chocolate fudge cake and lemon blossom pie for pudding.  We are absolutely stuffed!  We enquire about breakfast and are told they serve it from 9-11am, guess we will be back in the morning!

 

Back at the boat we turn the satellite tv on, it takes an age to get a signal but we finally get one and watch a couple of hours of junk tv before turning in before 9pm!

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I think St Olaves is somewhere you get swashing noise no matter what boat you're on. Your electric/generator hybrid time thing sounds like a lot of bother! I think I'll stick to conventional diesels for a while. 

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On 10/26/2017 at 02:29, Timbo said:

Even in 1974 we still had a range in the 'parlour' and a copper in the kitchen.

Up until about 1981 we had an outside loo and tin bath, gas fires in both downstairs rooms. Then we bought the house, double glazing inside loo and bathroom and so forth.

Charlie

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44 minutes ago, Bound2Please said:

double glazing inside loo

I've heard of clingfilm on the bog...but double glazing? Surely, they'd see the frames? :facepalm:

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3 hours ago, Broads01 said:

I think St Olaves is somewhere you get swashing noise no matter what boat you're on. Your electric/generator hybrid time thing sounds like a lot of bother! I think I'll stick to conventional diesels for a while. 

Yes we said exactly the same thing!  Forget the electric it's a pain in the bum.  She's a lovely boat other than that but don't think we'd have her again!  Might not be so bad if we'd have stayed north, with lower speed limits and less tide.

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On 10/24/2017 at 19:18, MrBlueSky said:

The shower do,s not pump out into the river,nothing go,s into the river.Its all kept onboard to be pumpedout,hence the need for regular pumpouts.We had 4 in 11 nights.

Got to thinking in the night (not a good thing at the best of times) about this business of keeping the grey water on board.    Fine for a couple of days but what if you have two weeks on her.       I cook from scratch everyday, shower, etc,   we top up with water everyday, well it does not  take much thought to realise that if you are putting in water every day and it is being stored on board, it must be a huge tank.    What happens when it fills up.    How do you know.   When you sink?   What brain box thought of this system.       Yes you can have pump outs but you cannot have a pump out for the grey water can you?     Wouldnt suit us. 

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2 minutes ago, Hylander said:

 

Got to thinking in the night (not a good thing at the best of times) about this business of keeping the grey water on board.    Fine for a couple of days but what if you have two weeks on her.       I cook from scratch everyday, shower, etc,   we top up with water everyday, well it does not  take much thought to realise that if you are putting in water every day and it is being stored on board, it must be a huge tank.    What happens when it fills up.    How do you know.   When you sink?   What brain box thought of this system.       Yes you can have pump outs but you cannot have a pump out for the grey water can you?     Wouldnt suit us. 

I’d assume it either has 2 separate tanks, 1 grey water, and one erm, human waste, or it all goes into one?

i know when I hired Fair Jubilee with its domestic flush toilet and full size bath (not sure about grey water but I think that went into the tank) that survived a week without pump out.

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So the more you shower etc, the more pumpouts you need

Edited by deebee29
To correct autocorrect error

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8 minutes ago, MrBlueSky said:

Pumpouts not puppies

Pity! That conjured up all sorts of disgusting mental images for me to enjoy. :) 

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Alan John’s post came in earlier as I was correcting Mr BlueSky’s post which the auto correct changed pumpouts to puppies.

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With regards to water consumption, being out on a boat does make us very conscious of our water usage. We don't find it necessary to shower every day, we generally re-use mugs and plates etc so that we only wash up once a day and we use on-shore facilities as much as we can. It's amazing how much you realise you waste at home. 

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The worst thing about wasting water is that its drinking water we are wasting!! What a huge proportion of the world would give to have that available to drink, let alone waste!!!

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9 hours ago, SwanR said:

With regards to water consumption, being out on a boat does make us very conscious of our water usage. We don't find it necessary to shower every day, we generally re-use mugs and plates etc so that we only wash up once a day and we use on-shore facilities as much as we can. It's amazing how much you realise you waste at home. 

Agree and not only the above but loo rolls,   there are only two of us and we get through loo rolls like they were going out of fashion at home and yet on the boat we use 1 a week.        I think this is because of the fear of blocking the loo.     When we get water I always fill the kettle and couple of saucepans for the evening meal.     We too dont shower every day but have a jolly good strip wash each morning and evening.     Anyone passing our boat the other day would have also had the pleasure of seeing me with a bowl of water washing my feet.      Just tell me is there anyone who can wash their tootsies in a sink on a boat.  I for one am not a contortionist.    

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Here we are "nicking" Moosey's thread again, so please excuse me, but I love diving into the details of toilet tanks. No pun intended!

The expressions grey and black water come from America where they always shy away from anything to do with bodily functions. Hence they call it the "rest room". Black water is sewage, or MURDER as we call it here and grey water is from showers, washbasins and the galley sink. So more modern boats will usually be fitted with one large tank which will contain both effluents. How big that tank should be, is the big question!  

 

100_0102.thumb.jpg.6a0bff87be0cb920795bab050671d6c1.jpg

This is the early version Classique, built by Crown Cruisers in Somerleyton. An eight berth boat with 2 toilets, 2 showers and a black water tank. The later, 2001 version of this boat has 3 toilets, 3 showers, 3 wash basins and the galley sink. In this one, everything is pumped into a grey water tank  of 800 litres capacity. When you think most diesel tanks are not much more than 200 litres, that's a big tank, and most mobile pump out machines in yacht stations, etc., will not pump it out in one go!

It needs a bit more "plumbing" in the boat to do this and there will often be a holding tank in the lower bilges where showers and basins can drain, before being pumped into the main tank on a float switch. To pump out a tank like this effectively, needs a serious shore installation and there must not be too many solids, so toilets will be electric macerators and the galley sink must be fitted with what Reggie Reeve would call a masturbating pump.

So it is an expensive and complex installation which depends as much on good shore facilities as it does on the boat's equipment.

Why do we need it?

It has been often proved that detergents, soaps, cooking fats and other such products are much worse for water quality that simple raw sewage. We are already winning the battle against bad water quality on the Broads but we have only half won it so far. Timbo and Marshman are both right to be concerned that many waters on the Broads are not getting enough tidal flow these days, so that phosphates are hanging around in the upper reaches.

So the moral of the story is, go to the toilet in the pub, and have a shower in boatyards or yacht stations.

Does the grey water tank in the Classique actually work? Can't tell you that as the French have no pumpout stations, so we have never been able to use it! Not my problem luckily - I'm retired!

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