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Engine Servicing


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Hi wayne...

Good to see you over the weekend.

To be quite frank, I think that much of the basic servicing can be done by yourself. I did a service on our last boat last year (Jupiter mist/Sealine S28 with twin volvo AD31's), and apart from my self created impeller problem, it all went rather well. I will be continuing my own service regime with Sea Hunter.

I changed fuel filters, pre fuel filters, air filters, oil filters, oil , belts and impellers as well as all the outdrive anodes. The closed loop cooling system didnt need doing after testing the coolant.

Being a complete novice, and definately not the engineering type, I quite suprised myself, and most things are quite straightforward. When I got stuck, I asked for help, and there was always someone there to help, either the very useful guy at Northgate Marine Volvo, at Goodchilds where we were moored, and not forgetting of course much invaluable advice from the great chaps on here.

There is are some pretty good books on servicing diesel engines on amazon too. Although it wasnt specific to my engine, it was damn useful, if only to understand what needs checking and when.

adam... :pirate :pirate :pirate

ps...vacuum oil extractor is a must for self servicing...well worth the investment :naughty:

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I am thinking of getting my engines serviced - they were done last season - alledgedly......hi fummy you should say that ,after just buying a boat recently,iam just in the process of repairing my drive after alledgedly work was done on it,

As the work i am having done on it is rather specialist i am having a mercruiser mechanic do it,

regarding engin,es i would personaly do my own,after a queote for 500 pounds to service two mercruisers ,all that was included was oil and filters,and a alternater belt,i ve just bought the lot for 240 pounds which includes two fresh water impelers and 20litres of oil ,ok i will have the hassle but for 250 pounds i,ll do it.

Depends on how confident /comfortable you feel doing it,with a manual it should be a breeze :party2:

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As you have probably worked out by now, I am probably the most useless person when it comes to engines (and pretty much anything that moves actually) but I must concur with Adam. After my lesson from the Volvo guy, I would be reasonably confident doing most of the service myself now with the exception of the belts. For some reason my brain stopped working and it wouldn't take anything in about belts !! lol !!

Oil filters, fuel filters etc, now I have been shown on a first hand basis are all easy, but as Adam says, get hold of a vacuum oil extractor thingy - very handy !!

The only thing I would be worried about is if I came up against a problem, but there are so many helpful knowledgable and nice people on here I think I will attempt it next year !

Wayne, you're really a hands on person - so have a go. If you're a little sceptical then get someone who knows what they are doing to watch over you - like I did ! I can recommend a superb mechanic who will show you how everything is done as he goes along if you want.

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yup Luke...if you are the 1st most useless, I am definately your assistant!!! :naughty:

Belts were simple/easy on the AD31's but I am a little anxious with the Kad32' as there is an extra belt for the compressor...but even so..I will give it a go and no doubt I will post up for some advice before doing so!

lb :pirate :pirate :pirate

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If you do it yourself Wayne then you start to learn about your engines. OK so as Luke found out you probably would come back on one engine rather than try and fix it at sea but if you are in a strange marina without a car it is far easier to change an impeller yourself than find someone to do it for you, especially on a bank holiday weekend, if you have the spares on board and can do it yourself then it is a 10 minute job.

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Servicing the downstairs bit is, I agree, well within the capability of most BUT, it is often not just a matter of changing filters, belts and oil. Many motors need valve clearance checked and on some it is critical that you do so, remember the pencil anodes, and check all hoses and clips for security and condition, make sure all electrical connections are clean and tight and not damaged. Even some belts require the tensioners to be set to specific torque values. General security of mountings on all components and the main bearer mounts is important too. Best practise is to get a proper service manual and follow it to the letter, make yourself a check list and tick it all off and the list will help you to make sure you have all the parts, consumables and tools required before you start the job. Many things are missed by the so called pro’s through carelessness, incompetence, pressure of work or laziness as has been amply demonstrated in previous post so if you feel able it is probably actually preferable to do everything within your capability yourself.

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O.K - so now geting all the parts ready for the service- Quite looking forward to having a go but I am a little stumped with chosing the oil.

Obviously I could go to Vovlo ££££££'s. The book says 15W/40 to API CD - which apparently is an old spec for Compression Diesel. Searching the internet people seem to use various products ranging from the expensive to Tesco's own brand.

What do you all use in diesels?

thanks

Wayne

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I use the Volvo stuff, it's only once a year after all and I am then certain it is the right spec. Whatever you use make sure that the spec includes a high level of drain down resistance, this is not so important for trucks and commercial boats but with most leisure marine engines the intervals between start up are often lengthy and drain down is therefore a really important factor.

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Wayne hi.

I used Volvo stuff last time. It is more expensive but a little peace of mind. However, Northgate Marine (Oulton Broad Volvo dealer) were happy to recommend/sell a cheaper alternative/equivalent, and clearly didnt see a problem with that. Why not have a chat with Peter at Northgate. I have found him hugely helpful with advice on servicing. If I was going to go for a cheaper alternative, I would rather it be one that a volvo engineer recommends.

Whilst I am no expert at all, I also agree with opinions I have seem on here before that changing the oil on more frequent intervals could be very sound advice.

So perhaps you could justify buying the lower cost oil and changing more often? I am going to do mine every six months, if only because we will more than likely do at least 120 hours a year on the engines...which is a lot more than many boats that I have seen static in marinas for months on end.

The marketing catchphrase "because I am worth it" springs to mind here!!! :naughty:

adam... :pirate :pirate :pirate

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I haven't change the oil in my lumps yet, as it was pretty clean on the dipsticks. I do need to top up though, as it seems the port one uses a drop or two. I am going to go with a cheaper one that I know Brundall Marinse Services use (not sure of the make though). Afterall, Volvo don't make oil, just stick a label on it and double the price! :norty:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all - now I am getting used to clambering around the engine bay I thought i would check the tappets..seeing as they are on the service list. The manual talks about the valves "rocking" and then says when no x rocks adjust y and gives a table of valves to adjust vs valves rocking.

What do they mean by rocking? :?

regards

Wayne

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When the piston is at TDC (Top dead centre) the point at which the valves are neither opening or closing. The rockers will then have a little free play in them.

Hiya

That's sort of what I thought..but why then are we checking another cylinder because at that stage all the others surely will be moving and will have no clearance...being rather thick today sorry :?:?

thanks

Wayne

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Well! It will probably tell you to adjust 4 when 1 is at TDC etc. Basically they give you a list something like that. It's to make sure you are adjusting the right set of rockers, at the right point in the 4 stroke cycle. With a diesel engine you will have to look for timing marks on the bottom pulley to achieve this. Cylinder 1 will be the one closest to the bottom pulley end of the engine.

So if it says adjust 4 when 1 is at TDC. Rotate the engine untill the timing marks line up.Looks at the rockers on 4 they should both be closed and will rattle back and forth a little. If a valve on 4 is open, then rotate the engine 360 degrees till the marks line up again and look at the rockers on 4 again.

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Is it possible that the rocking they refer to is the valve being fully compressed, so if valve x is fully compressed (rocked fully down) that valve Y is totally decompressed and in the right position for the valve clearance to be checked?

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Is it possible that the rocking they refer to is the valve being fully compressed, so if valve x is fully compressed (rocked fully down) that valve Y is totally decompressed and in the right position for the valve clearance to be checked?

No, when a cylinder is rocking, both valves are shut and no pressure is on the rockers, hence they rock backwards and forwards cheersbar

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But at that point apart from the rocker that was at TDC all the other valves would be compressed so you would have no valve clearance to adjust.

The old Haynes manuals used to give the same information so if valve 1 was fully compressed valve 5 would be decompressed and so in the right position to adjust its clearance. The reference from Wayne's post was rocked not rocking so possibly it is referring to rocked as in fully compressed rather than rocking at its TDC position.

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