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LondonRascal

Trixie (Rascal's Fleet)

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Why do a hire yard sell a boat?

A need to keep up with fashion and style of craft?

Or have they become uneconomic to maintain for continous use during the season?

A question, because I don't know.

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The Hains 32 is a lovely boat, very well fitted out  but it’s a little small in length and width and with a £250k price tag much prefer the 35 Hull Hains, Broom, Westwood.

A low hours 5 to 10 year old example for half the above cost would be my bet.

Ive never bought an ex hire boat preferring low hours private but can see the attraction with a well maintained example from the likes a Richadsons but would stay well away from the likes of the recent old alpha models.

John

 

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8 minutes ago, ChrisB said:

Why do a hire yard sell a boat?

A need to keep up with fashion and style of craft?

Or have they become uneconomic to maintain for continous use during the season?

A question, because I don't know.

As we realised because it was falling apart!

(ok maybe it wasnt quite that bad but it certainly needed more work than we expected being as it was sold to us as a “fully refurbished exhire craft”)

Some yards must sell off the older to help finance the new, others just sell off the sheds they dont want to spend any money on to bring up to standard. 

I suppose it all depends what standard you are happy with but I (i think i can say like Robin) prefer things to be in a good state of repair and fully functional. 

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On the othe hand it can be an economic way into boating, for many possibly the only way. As with anything it is a case of buyer beware, a survey will give you enough information about whether to make an offer or walk away and at what level. A sound boat that is cosmetically tired can be an excellent choice, especially if you are handy with tools!

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I have an Richardsons Calypso and an ex Topcraft Topliner.

I had thorough surveys on both.

The Topliner was in excellent condition with a very high standard of fit out. It was sold as the yard was closing at short notice but hadn't been left to deteriorate.

The calypso was good as it had been in private ownership for 7 years before I purchased it.

Just go into it with your eyes open and be realistic about what you are getting.

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3 hours ago, ChrisB said:

I must have misunderstood your intentions Robin for which I am sorry.

With your purchase of the Trader I assumed that you wished to go, if not bluewater then overseas. 

It's okay, a lot of people think that is why I wanted such a capable boat - in truth I am personally perfectly fine using Independence as an enormous day boat with a cruise to Reedham and back. while it is quite an amazing feeling to explore an area and arrive at a new destination by way of sea, and I am more than happy to do such, if the opportunity never presented itself again I would not be upset. Being brutally honest, the only boat I have an emotional attachment to is Broad Ambition, I care about her and work on her and help keep her looked after in a deeper way. Independence and Trixie are very different, with most of the works being carried out by Boatyards. I am having the works I am on both boats done  because it is how I feel boats should be - in perfect order and looking tidy with the smallest niggles being sorted before they become bigger issues. 

As to ex- hire boats...

I am not too sure myself why some boats come up for sale out of a hire fleet and others do not. I guess firstly it will be down to how well that type have let in the proceeding season or two. What is clear is it is not a rash decision taken at short notice, but often a year in advance which is why you will find many hire boats for sale come with the point of being available 'at the end of the season'. Now, I may be a little cynical here, but if you've identified boats that you are going to retire will your level of maintenance on these be the same in the proceeding years?

In some circumstances you can really get a good deal - a boat which might have had a reactively recent re-engine, new hob and oven along with a new fridge and maybe some newish upholstery comes up on the market this is more attractive than one of the same class which has not had such improvements. Some ex-Hire boats may come with a full inventory of utensils, cutlery, crockery etc others will not. The reason I am personally put off a hire boat as a purchase is because there is no getting away from it they have had a hard life. Many hundreds, maybe thousands of people have spent time on them - and so everything will have had a lot of use, not just mechanically, but things like  windows being scratched, catches not working as once did, berths and seats being a bit less 'supportive' and so on. I am not going to go into detail but suffice to say some of the things I have seen having a look under the floors and in engine bays on hire boats over the years have made me pleased it was only a short period I was on the boat - but equally, some others have genuinely surprised me with their upkeep. Something as simple has having navigation lights put in and the wiring will cost a fair bit, that said if you want to have a 40 foot plus boat as a canvas to work on and you are going to live on it and the original cost is say £40,000 it could be considered a bargain compared to a bricks and mortar home.

I think Richardson's are the most fair and reasonable going - countless people have bout their ex-hire boats some have spent big to make them into lovely craft with partial or full re-fits and painting, others have simply removed the logos and re-named them and short of the usual remedial works here and there they have stayed as were from the day they came off hire. Other yards seem to charge a real premium for their boats and won't negotiate much if at all on the asking price.

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If boating on The Broads and using your boat often, one must be realistic that the boat will get the odd extra knock or two. An ex hire boat tends to lead to less sleepless nights than having a new, or nearly new boat. An ex hire boat is also a good easy and relatively cheap introduction to boat ownership.

One thing that a lot of people do not perhaps consider, is that hire boats are generally built with easy maintenance in mind, maybe at the expense of being aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Larger inspection panels and hatches. Easier access to the engine etc. Some companies tend to over engineer to ensure less problems in service. I've hired a boat from a Northern yard where the reed filter not only needed cleaning every day, but would over heat if it wasn't. My own ex hire boat is engineered to the point that it can often be left for a whole week or more and still not give a problem. The primary reed filter on my boat is a very large diameter pipe that would probably suit a boat twice the size. No kidding the filter inside is a piece of guttering drain pipe with literally hundreds of tiny holes drilled into it. Very little gets through it and due to the length of it and the amount of holes in it, it has never got blocked. The finer debris that does make it through the primary filer is then caught by the more normal swirl pot with filter and glass see through lid. Often checked, but rarely needing to be cleaned. I've attached a picture of the primary filer assembly. Finding a pipe wrench to fit the cap was a nightmare. The filter may be heath Robinson, but extremely effective.

Robin's self acknowledged slightly cynical view, in my opinion is probably not the case in most instances. Although a yard may ear mark certain boats for sale, they have no idea if, or when it may sell. They still need the boat to be reliable in the meantime so I think it unlikely that corners will be cut in maintenance. When I bought my boat the yard had four in the class and two were for sale. I was told to have a look around all four and pick the one I wanted to make an offer on, so whilst the yard had identified they wanted to sell two, they had no real preference over which out of the four they were selling. All four were twelve years old at the time, and had just under gone extensive refits two years prior, including new engines.

Primary Filter.jpg

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You pay your money and take your choice, there are some rubbish ex-hire boats around and some extremely good ones, likewise there are good and bad amongst boats that have always been in private hands, its up to you to make sure what the condition of the boat is before you buy regardless of where it comes from, the difference is that ex-hire boats are built for use on the broads, they are generally sturdier and fit under bridges and easier to maintain, many private only boats have come from other waterways where they get knocked about in locks, you also tend to pay a premium for a privately owned  boat that doesn't necessarily reflect its condition and the amount you can spend on it bringing it up to scratch.

Each to their own but for me for use on the broads  its ex-hire every time for value for money and versatility, they win hands down for maximising usable space and ease of access when mooring as generally they have a lower freeboard and wider sidewalks, important considerations as you become less agile.

Fred

 

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I remember a boat with one of those massive filters in it, I am pretty sure it was either Distant Horizon or Sunlit Horizon - I remember at hand over being told if anything gets blocked don't try and touch it and call us.

I also have just been alerted to a 'bargain' in Belgium. A 1991 Sheerline 1070 (Centre Cockpit) for £46,000 but very negotiable on price, Fitted with an electric canopy, bow thruster, in all original gel and just over 2,000Hrs on her engine. Lovely but don't worry there won't be a Rascal heading over the Channel. Seems a decent price for this boat having seen these pop up on the Broads before out of hire attracting more than that.

 

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Very nice looking boat, wouldn't be Griff's cup of tea though, got a Nanni engine. :default_rofl:

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Ive always been put off the 1070 by the beam.

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I just had a look on Graig's Database and find I did not need to send in photos - already listed on there is Trixie.

I am not sure why, but this feels a kind of achievement to see the same registration and boat as she was and now as she is. It is also nice to see my Mum at the helm when they were taken and not me!

TRX2.jpg.fb231e782bdbd6bb74aee26db67af2da.jpg

TRX1.jpg.653f9d8814782f1a915fdceda6ef7cec.jpg

 

 

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The stripe colour match is superb, shame about the fender colour lol

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24 minutes ago, scaniaman said:

The stripe colour match is superb, shame about the fender colour lol

The stripe colour is actually too bright - a Cherry type of red, not a deeper Burgundy colour so it is one of the items that is being changed to better match with the canopy. I am also having the boot topping re-applied in a darker red using a far harder wearing paint and that will be brought up just a couple of inches as currently when fully fuelled and watered with two people onboard the waterline can be above the current boot line which has caused muck to accumulate on the white gel coat of the hull.  While I have no blue fender, I always carry one onboard as a spare to be used at certain moorings, the grey fenders break up the colours and I have yet to see another boat with this colour - it has a metallic finish wish lots of small reflective particles much like a metallic paint.

 

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