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StillCruising

Ranworth

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I don’t usually do ‘Holiday Tales’ but we are just back from a few days afloat which included an ‘interesting’ stop at Ranworth.  We arrived around mid afternoon and there was only one space left at the end of the front moorings, the wind was blowing across and after three attempts at stern mooring with the wind blowing the bow round we were successful on the fourth attempt and were grateful for the assistance of two gents that took our lines and tied off whilst I dropped the mud weight.  With us squared up there was one mooring post and about three feet of key heading visible from the water. During the rest of the afternoon there was a steady stream of boats cruising along the moorings in the hope that someone might be leaving and saw that although there was not enough room at the end to more a boat of any size especially with the side wind blowing. Eventually up turn a party of middle aged blokes on Tobago 2 and decide to have a go at mooring their 12ft wide boat on a 3ft key heading with one post. After a lot of revving and shouting of directions from their crew together with the effect of the wind they managed to crunch into us and took a chunk out of the side of Evesham Light moored on the first of the side moorings in the process.  One of the blokes then got ashore and tried to pull it in which was never going to happen, I asked the bloke on the rope what make then think that they could moor a 12ft boat in a 3ft space (think car park scene at the start of Police Academy 1) and was told in no uncertain terms that it was my fault and that I should have moved over to let them in, a bit tricky when we were fender to fender with the next boat.  After a lot of moaning they eventually gave up and moored where there was now a space down the side. 

The wind started to drop and a small hired Bounty type bathtub with a young couple and a dog tried to more and were successful in getting in square to the key heading so that they had a least part of the stern against it and we gave them some advice about the use of the mud weigh to hold the front which was politely accepted. It turned out the their dog was only six month old and was shall I say adventurous, not only running round they decks but ours as well !. This was not a problem until it obviously caught the smell of food from our oven and literally dived through the open window onto swimbos lap ! . I picked up the dog and asked the couple if they had lost something, they were mortified but we all had a good laugh about it and they went off to The Maltsters.

During the later part of the afternoon we say a two Richos boats with youngsters onboard which were obviously together had cruised the moorings but eventually rafted together out in the broad. However one of them together with the crew of the other returned later obviously intent on mooring and came up with the bright idea of mooring stern to Evesham Light as you can imagine this was not well received by those on board but as luck would have it the couple with the Bounty just returned and were going to leave.  The crew told us that they were going to the Maltsters and were not stopping all night but did we think it was possible to moor next to us in place of the now departed Bounty.  Even though the wind had stopped it was a tricky manoeuvre with a large boat but the helm made a pretty decent job of it and willingly took advice on roping up and mud weighting. They returned later from the pub, thanked us for our help and apart from nearly leaving one girl behind, left without incident to re-raft up in the broad.

The rest of the night was uneventful but in the morning when we were leaving we had to get the now very stuck in mud weight up. The dammed thing defied all the tugging that I could muster (which wasn’t much) so we decided to ‘drive it out’,  swimbo selected forward  and with a few revs   we were off. After about 40 ft to be clear of other boats she dropped the throttle and I stated to pull in the rope, not my most favourite job I have to say.  After a lot of heaving (and swearing) the mud weight came into sight but somehow it looked totally different to when I chucked it in, not because it was covered in disgusting slimy goo but because it was wearing a pair of red checked underpants !. Over the years of broads boating I have dragged many things from the water but never a pair of pants in the event they were returned to the watery depths.

Thus ended our stay at Ranworth meeting some thoroughly nice and by their own admission ‘complete novice’ young holidaymakers and a brief encounter with a dog.

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Wonderful write up. Thank you for sharing. Ranworth is certainly so popular that people will do all sorts of strange things to try to get moored there. Personally unless I am desperate for water or shopping I prefer the quiet of the Island to playing sardines at the staithe!

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Great write up, thanks for sharing!

We’ve not managed to moor up at Ranworth yet on a cruiser, though we’ve overnighted on a Hunter’s yacht at Perci’s Island (lots of goose poop) and mud-weighted on the Broad during a thunderstorm last year, using a dinghy to get ashore.  Mooring at Ranworth proper is on my ‘bucket list’.

Helen

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And that's why I put up with a dinghy in tow, love Ranworth, love the Maltsters can't be bothered with the hassle of getting a mooring!

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We've managed to get on the staithe mostly out of season. Made our minds up last October that we would have a short cruise day leaving early from our previous mooring and arrive around 10.30 to 11 and then stay all day. It worked out really well but we still got one of the last spaces until people left after lunch.

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Indeed Jean, if you're after a daytime visit as we were at the end of May then you can't beat arriving about 10am after a few overnight moorers have left. 

Of course most of us love Ranworth but I do accept, in the summer particularly, it can be a lottery as to whether you can moor or not so I'm prepared to accept defeat if necessary. Some folks though, seem obsessed that they have to moor there whatever it takes and nowhere else could possibly do. 

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4 hours ago, StillCruising said:

... after a lot of heaving (and swearing) the mud weight came into sight but somehow it looked totally different to when I chucked it in, not because it was covered in disgusting slimy goo but because it was wearing a pair of red checked underpants !.

I have to ask, what was it wearing when you chucked it in? 

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It is indeed. For 10 years we moored on Priory Meadow, that's the one on the right as you approach the Staithe. I love the place.

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Ranworth is for many a very special place.

I visit more than many. Winter, Spring and Summer. Sometimes by boat but mostly by car.

It is a place visited by many holiday makers in their cruisers, by sail, by motor cruisers, both private and hire. By car, by walkers, even by coach parties from the local holiday camps. 

School trips by coach. To visit the cathedral of the Broads, to visit the nature center on Ranworth Broad.

For some, during our peak period it is a place of frustration, of anxiety, indeed dispair of a lack of help, guidance, advice.

Where is the Broads Authority at this very important, focal, integral part of the Broads experience. 

Sure a Quay Assistant would be good. A Ranger, but these guys come at a premium, very knowledgeable, indespensable.

However, at little cost there are those who are the very essence of our culture, our commitment to the Broads.

The volunteer. Do not underestimate him. He comes at little or no cost. He will be of an age that brings authority, understanding, knowledge, and commitment.

The Broads Authority needs to recognise this assett.

Provide him or her, with a uniform, to assist the visitor to moor. Move boats to utilize the space available, to advise on how to moor, to inform, to simply enhance the Broads experience.

Andrew.

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Wussername could be describing John Lane, who ran the information kiosk for Blakes and looked after the moorings, for many years in the 70s and 80s.

He is indeed, missed nowadays.

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 It turned out the their dog was only six month old and was shall I say adventurous, not only running round they decks but ours as well !. This was not a problem until it obviously caught the smell of food from our oven and literally dived through the open window onto swimbos lap ! 

 

 

Have these people never heard of a lead.    Dogs should be kept on a lead if they are likely to go AWOL.     I love dogs but am terrified of one jumping up so it would not have suited me.   You really took it well.     At the end of the day - who needs to watch TV soaps ,  real life is far mor entertaining.

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Wyndam. Well I suppose somebody had to ask, when it went in the mud weight was naked save for a coat of blue paint.

Hylander. They did have a lead, at the time we getting ready to go to the pub and believed that the dog was on board, what they hadn't realised was that when they shut the front door the slide bolt had stopped it shutting property and it started to open enough for the dog to escape unnoticed.

We both love dogs and we used to take our Doberman on the boat but with the wisdom of the years ours was always tethered if the canopy was open or on a lead when ashore. In the end he became to arthritic that we could not get on and off or handle the internal stairs and his boating days were over (at 60Kg I couldn't lift him), sadly he died 18 months later. On the up side we do have a bit more room in the bed now.

P1050119.JPG

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John Lane, who ran the information kiosk for Blakes and looked after the moorings, for many years in the 70s and 80s. He was given an honour in one of the Queens birthday lists for services to tourism on the Broads.  He was also on small boats and the like during WW2 and would quite happily remiss them to us.  I seem to remember he had to abandon ship twice and lived through the experience - state the obvious Griff

What a gent John Lane was - very knowledgeable about the Broads in general, it seems as I knew him forever although he initially was a friend of my late Dads.  He had many funny anecdotes from looking after Ranworth staithe too, could listen and sit with him for hours - Oh hang on, we used to do just that

Griff

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I think temp pontoons like at boat shows from end June To end August is the way forwards. Plenty of open water to go out into. Also if properly planned it could stop idiots ramming their way in.

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26 minutes ago, brundallNavy said:

Never been not able to moor at Ranworth, guess we are just lucky :55c8f94984577_default_AnimatedGifDogs(127):

Snap

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1 hour ago, brundallNavy said:

Never been not able to moor at Ranworth, guess we are just lucky :55c8f94984577_default_AnimatedGifDogs(127):

And it can be such a hard place to tear yourself away from!

DCP_5417.JPG

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