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vanessan

Anyone For Hickling?

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When the pilots' office gauge reads 6' 11" the actual bridge clearance is 7' 0" and is the only accurate gauge for the bridge clearance height.  There are at least four other bridge gauges actually on the river and not one of them measures the height consistent with each other, let alone the 'official' gauge.

As a footnote, I might add that you may be surprised to hear that very many people read the gauge as illustrated in Howard's photograph as 7'  1"!

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I have to admit that I have trouble getting my head round some aspects of how the tides work in reality  (as opposed to various theories I've had).

Taking average air pressure, average tide and no wind,  my questions apply to 1 tidal cycle from high to high and taken at Potter bridge itself.

Would I be correct in saying that the ebb lasts longer than the flood, and if so, by how much?

If High tide is at midday, what time will the clearance be at it's greatest, and for how long will it stay at that level?

Finally is the falling water level dropping at a constant rate, if not how would you describe the fall on a graph.?

Sorry to bombard you with these questions Expilot, but I can't think who else to ask.

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You could ask me, but all I can tell you is when the tide's coming in the water level's going up, and when the tide's going out, the water level's going down. And the flow changes direction. Except at Yarmouth, when for an hour after low tide the Bure is flowing out, but the water level is going up. Any clearer? No? Good job you didn't ask me, then.

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On 29/06/2018 at 10:25, MauriceMynah said:

I have to admit that I have trouble getting my head round some aspects of how the tides work in reality  (as opposed to various theories I've had).

Taking average air pressure, average tide and no wind,  my questions apply to 1 tidal cycle from high to high and taken at Potter bridge itself.

Would I be correct in saying that the ebb lasts longer than the flood, and if so, by how much?

If High tide is at midday, what time will the clearance be at it's greatest, and for how long will it stay at that level?

Finally is the falling water level dropping at a constant rate, if not how would you describe the fall on a graph.?

Sorry to bombard you with these questions Expilot, but I can't think who else to ask.

MM I have this written down for when we used to go under Potter bridge a lot (don't bother so much now, we're happy to stay hidden the 'wrong' side of the bridge).    "Drops 3" in the first two hours, then a further 1-2" after.  Go under 1 or 1.5 hours before low water in case tide is early as it won't drop much more but will start rising as soon as the tide changes".

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oh and underneath that I have written " look for high pressure and Easterlies to get under"   

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So hoping to get the old girl under potter bridge this summer, then up to the reeds it is for a sail, a pint and a fish.

6,6 in the centre is what we have, at the shoulders which are only 8ft apart she is lower. 

M

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Malanka said:

So hoping to get the old girl under potter bridge this summer, then up to the reeds it is for a sail, a pint and a fish.

6,6 in the centre is what we have, at the shoulders which are only 8ft apart she is lower. 

M

If I had to guess, I would say your widest point for Potter Bridge will be the pulpit rails.  I no longer have my records for required draft heights for Broads cruisers and yachts, but my memory tells me that all Broom Admirals in the hire fleet were listed at 7' 0"  If Malanka is a Broom Commodore then she may need a little less, but I doubt she will pass Potter at 6' 8" - and certainly not with the pulpit.  I wait to be proved wrong.

There are many apocryphal stories relating to this bridge.  One of my favourites relate to a time, long ago, when Ambrose was one of the bridge pilots.  The story makes a good after dinner speech that can be extended to a minimum half hour.  The very abbreviated version amounts to: 

Beautifully varnished vessels' skipper/owner asks Ambrose to put his boat through that infernal bridge.  Ambrose politely explains that the gentleman's fine vessel will not pass Potter because the water level is too high. 

"My good man, I've been through that bridge hundreds of times and I'm telling you it will pass."

"And I, sir, am the pilot on duty - and I'm telling you that she will not."

"In that case, I wish to speak with your boss."

Ambrose explains that his boss is not at the yard that day.  

"Then call him and hand the phone to me.  I wish to speak with him."

Ambrose calls his boss and hands to phone to said vessel owner.  There is an animated conversation.  Ambrose's boss asks to be given back to Ambrose.  Ambrose takes the phone back from said skipper.  Boss tells Ambrose to put the gentleman's boat through.  Ambrose protests to his boss that the water levels are too high.

"I'm your boss, Ambrose, and I'm telling you that if the gentleman tells you that his boat will fit through the bridge then you will put the boat up through the bridge."  

"The boss says that you're right, sir, and I'm to put you through," says Ambrose.

Ambrose jumps aboard fine vessel and approaches the bridge at normal piloting speed, all beautifully lined up central to the bridge.  As the bows disappear beneath the arch there is the heart-rending sound of splintering wood, clanging metal and much kerfuffle.  Out the other side comes said fine vessel minus searchlight, horn, windscreens and the canopy at a jaunty angle just managing to hang on at the stern.

"Well," says Ambrose with his usual cap-doffing, deferential manner.  "I appear to owe you an apology, sir.  You said it would go through.  And, sir, you were right, that did!"

I owe this story to my bosses, Patrick and Robin Richardson of Phoenix Fleet, who are still responsible for piloting at the bridge.  There are scores more that really need to be written down.

 

Edited by expilot
typos
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I have to say the pilot has been doing a roaring trade today.  Lots of boats going through bit like times gone by.

 

lovely weather .

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2 hours ago, expilot said:

There are scores more that really need to be written down.

There could be a cue there EP..........:default_biggrin:

I bet it would be a great read!

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She is six six at the top of the pulpit rail . Probably a bit less with full tanks. I will measure again on Saturday. The rails match the profile further back. 

 

She is a 1953 broom commander 38 x 10ft 6

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She is a 1953 broom commander 38 x 10ft 6"

Just a little-un then!    But arguably the best example of her class afloat today

Griff

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Many thanks Charlie, who am I to disagree.

 

M

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Just had two fantastic days up at Hickling

Can tell you tonight there is fag paper width between the Richardsons boats up at the pub at Hickling Broad.  26 years ago we were up there ,  with this weather ,  quite like old times.

 

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its lucky that Norfolk isnt likely to get the rain they are predicting for down this way tonight then, thundery showers and 30mm of rain, that 30mm might be all that was needed to stop them getting back through.

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This is how it used to be,  pilot run off his feet for a change.  Shame about the duck and goose poo you have to wade through to get to the pilots office.   Fantastic weather everyone making the most of it.

Hubby caught huge Bream up there.  They were like dinner plates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Hylander said:

This is how it used to be,  pilot run off his feet for a change.  Shame about the duck and goose poo you have to wade through to get to the pilots office.   Fantastic weather everyone making the most of it.

Hubby caught huge Bream up there.  They were like dinner plates.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Dover Sole the size of a dinner plate is more my style. With just some really fresh salad and a glass of Pouilly Fuisse.  Perhaps a little coleslaw and sauerkraut on the side.

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18 minutes ago, ChrisB said:

A Dover Sole the size of a dinner plate is more my style. With just some really fresh salad and a glass of Pouilly Fuisse.  Perhaps a little coleslaw and sauerkraut on the side.

Oh happy memories! I would just suggest that Dover sole would be best with a Pouilly Fumé or a Sancerre. Or maybe a Chablis, from just a bit further north.

Pouilly Fuissé is the only accompaniment for lobster, especially a thermidor.

Oh! Excuse me! My tastebuds are taking over. I had better go outside for a moment!

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4 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

Oh happy memories! I would just suggest that Dover sole would be best with a Pouilly Fumé or a Sancerre. Or maybe a Chablis, from just a bit further north.

Pouilly Fuissé is the only accompaniment for lobster, especially a thermidor.

Oh! Excuse me! My tastebuds are taking over. I had better go outside for a moment!

We must meet up when you are next over, and lets have the lot and decide then!

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There are some really smashing moorings up there.      Such a shame it is a rarity that holiday makers cannot get up their that often with their boats.  Not only the moorings shown in the piccy but a load of others.    What a waste.

 

 

HICKLING 2018.jpg

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1 hour ago, Hylander said:

There are some really smashing moorings up there.      Such a shame it is a rarity that holiday makers cannot get up their that often with their boats.  Not only the moorings shown in the piccy but a load of others.    What a waste.

 

 

HICKLING 2018.jpg

Look upon it as a bonus.

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All it needs is a boatbuilder to once again build the boats, which will go under the low bridges. But, while the latest 'must haves' mean only 'high & mighty' designs are being built, then the areas above the low bridges will remain quiet and under used. I realise that the river levels appear, for whatever reason, to be a little higher than they once were. But historically, broads boatbuilders have adapted their designs, to utilise all the available navigation. 

Perhaps, one day. more hire boatyards will see the potential for boats, that are able to use all of the navigable Norfolk Broads and build them again. Or, maybe those days are gone and our need for 'creature comforts' mean wide beam, high air draft, boats are going to be the only ones built. A pity really, because people are missing out on some of the most beautiful parts of the Norfolk & Suffolk Broads. But, for those that want them, there are still a few boats that will still pass under Potter Heigham, Wroxham & Beccles bridges, you've just got to find and hire (or buy) them...

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there is a lovely little mooring on candle dyke, where Polly and I moored up after the salhouse meet, it was just big enough for a yacht and a martham cruiser, and perfectly placed to get back to the yard next morning.

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1 hour ago, grendel said:

there is a lovely little mooring on candle dyke, where Polly and I moored up after the salhouse meet, it was just big enough for a yacht and a martham cruiser, and perfectly placed to get back to the yard next morning.

Is it called Slea .....  I cannot recall the name ,  we stayed on a single mooring the first day.   We hired Bittern.  Came back to the holiday cottage with the boat and then went off again the next day.   Will say it is quite an education watching privateers over staying at the 24 hour mooring.  Watched all the tricks,  turning the boat,  moving up a couple of boats.   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It's a lovely part of the broads we are lucky to be on this side of the bridge, I see so many people come up from potter and instantly turn left towards Hickling and Horsey without exploring down to West Somerton through Martham Broad. It's well worth a visit even for the crystal clear water and the sheer amount of wildlife you can see.

Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

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I once sailed a Matham Boat half-decker up the channel to Martham Broad & back without needing to tack (its a bit narrow anyway for that!).  Fishermen never heard us coming...

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