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****residential moorings poll****


jillR

would you consider having official residential moorings in broads boat yards to be a good thing?  

54 members have voted

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as the broads authority are making decisions on this subject at the moment i thought it would be good to ask your

opinion on the subject as it affects us all.

please come and have your say.

the poll will run for a 2 weeks and you will be able to change your mind.

please feel free to add comments for and against

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I'm being selfish really. :)

It would improve the security for the non-liveaboards.

On-site eyes and ears for 24/7 has got to be good thing for everyone.

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I have voted Yes, as i can see that it would be good to have the 24/7 security of someone staying on site, but im unsure if the residents would feel comfortable having inexperianced hirers manouvering the boat they have just picked up around their homes if they were moored in a hireyard, knowing the problems some members have faced with their own boats whilst moored at Ferry Marina and similar yards where private and hire craft are moored in close proximity, and thinking about the major disturbances and noise of turn-around day, when the fumes alone from so many boats moving in close quarters of a marina can be choking for anyone onboard or standing on the quayside :naughty: .

It would probably be best for all concerned if the residential moorings were kept to within the private moorings yards and dykes help to avoid such problems :)

Julz :wave

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hi julz

i have known residential boaters who have been happy to work and live in large hire yards in the past and put up with the

inconvenience of fumes etc along with the rest of the yard staff.

a better option than ...

Alternative Option DP24a:

Do not allow for any new residential moorings across the Broads area.

jill

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YES... :clap

Every marina we have berthed in, have had at least one residential moorer and in all cases these people are invaluable in terms of help with information, always being there to take your lines when the weather is bad and, of course, the very valuable additional security. We have in the past exchanged mobiles, so that if there is ever anything amiss at weekends,they can contact us.

However, I think one or two in each marina is enough.

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hi jupes

in a medium or large yard i would say that idealy two would be minimum, for their own security

to help each other and times of absence e.g. holidays, illness etc

long winter months on your own at night aint much fun

i can imagine that private boat owners would prefer a mooring within sight of the residential boat

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hi jupes

in a medium or large yard i would say that two would be minimum, for their own security

to help each other and times of absence e.g. holidays, illness etc

long winter months on your own at night aint much fun

i can imagine that private boat owners would prefer a mooring within sight of the residential boat

Yes, can understand that.

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Over the years, I've been in two hire/private mixed Marinas and one private Marina.

All of them have had quite a few almost permanent liveaboards, where the owners did have another permanent address (elsewhere in the UK) , but stayed on their boats for much of the summer months at least.

It was much more preferable to leaving your boat in a ghost town over night and for most of the week.

As has already been said on this thread, a sort of "neighborhood watch" existed, as well as a sort of village community spirit.

I would imagine the Police would much prefer that Marinas had some residential occupancy, it'd probably reduce theft and vandalism in the otherwise deserted basins.

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It's common sense really, I know the owners of the yard where I moor are always pleased when I show up for a few days in winter, as obviously it's a free security guard (With German Shepherd) whilst they are closed. Works very well I think, so it's a YES from me too cheers

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I consider myself lucky I moor ajacent to a very pleasent couple who live aboard their boat who are always ready to assist when I am leaving and returning to my mooring (without be asked), but more importantly always available for a chat and general help and advice, these people are the eyes and ears of the yard, they are always aware of what is going on and have even informed me when I have inadvertly left my VHF on, to their inconvenience after a weekend away on the boat, I take my hat off to them. However there are some people who claim to live aboard I would not want moored in the marina let alone adjacent to me, one springs to mind who thinks its OK to moor a half sunken, oil leaking, apaulingly kept, WWII amphibious landing craft in Thorpe island, I find this an eyesore and would certainly not want it moored next to me. I do not mean to offend anybody but its just my opinion.

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hi qv

i agree that oily wrecks are not desirable residential or not even though i do consider some wrecks as restorations

waiting to hapen and destroying them means that will never hapen and in some cases that would be a shame.

i dont think that the D.U.C.K at thorpe is residential

jill

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I live on Thorpe Island and the amphibious landing craft referred to is certainly not a liveaboard. I haven't seen it leaking any fluids, and nor is it half sunk.

It has no engine and is used as a workboat to take over the bins every week. It has to be towed across to perform this task.

It is an interesting vessel to say the least, but is hardly an example that should be used to criticise liveaboards.

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With reference to the 'eyes and ears' comments - that has certainly proved to be the case here at Thorpe Island.

Last week for instance there was some organised thieving going on round here. A person was apprehended at 5.00am (!) going round with a stolen dinghy full of stolen boat things - mainly oars (there were more than ten) as well as an expensive electric outboard and a stolen boat canopy being used as a cover for the contraband.

Without the actions of a liveaboard - incidentally from the south side of Thorpe Island - the stolen goods would not have been retrieved. My neighbour and I went down the river for a look later on and also recovered another stolen dinghy hidden up a small cut.

Shockingly we have very good descriptions etc, and have also seen the perpetrator return, but despite ringing the Broads Beat they have yet to either return my calls or visit me when they said they would. I still have some of the items here if anyone would like to claim them.

I'll say no more at the moment about Broads Beat as they have promised yet again to visit the Thorpe Island Residents Association next wednesday - I'll reserve my judgement until then.

I shudder to think what security would be like on Thorpe Island though without liveaboards present - and if the BA have their way, that is what will occur.

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difficult one,

when I think of a live aboard I tend to think nice 50 footer or dutch barge and as has already been said there are numerous benifits to having liveaboards around but then I think of some of the liveaboards I have seen and shudder.

If it is within a marina that can provide proper facility's then I can't see any argument against it and plenty of benifits for the other boat owners but I would vote a resounding no to allowing them to reside on the banks of the river.

If in a marina the marina owner would make sure the vessel was presentable and they were not causing nuicance. on the river you run the risk of wrecks, rubish everywhere and lack of toilet and washing facilitys giving rise to health risks.

You also risk them becoming a community and wreeking havoc on an area.

so yes to marina based livaboards no to river based.

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I have voted yes but I agree with most of the posts that have some reservations. I don't know why it is that SOME people who live aboard appear to live in squalor whilst others have immaculate boats and even tended gardens, I guess it is the same with SOME landbased people as well. So in principle I am for it.

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I can understand the concerns about the appearance of a minority of liveaboards.

My responses are based on the understanding that if they BA did change their stance and officially permit liveaboards (in Marinas and boatyards), then there would be a reasonable standard of appearance required.

IMHO it's definitely possible to achieve a happy medium between a floating shanty town and BA's unique (as far as I have heard) draconian "no residential" edict.

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As has been previously mentioned allowing live-aboards in marinas/yards would enable the marina owner to dictate standards, they have quite detailed terms associated with their mooring agreement so un-desirables, in what ever form, would quickly find no where to moor.

I think it a cracking idea to allow limited live-aboard space in marinas and yards but of course the live-aboard owner still has very little rights, they can be ejected at any time from their moorings, so to some extent it is still a nomadic life.

Just out of interest would they be liable to pay council tax?

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As has been previously mentioned allowing live-aboards in marinas/yards would enable the marina owner to dictate standards, they have quite detailed terms associated with their mooring agreement so un-desirables, in what ever form, would quickly find no where to moor.

I think it a cracking idea to allow limited live-aboard space in marinas and yards but of course the live-aboard owner still has very little rights, they can be ejected at any time from their moorings, so to some extent it is still a nomadic life.

Just out of interest would they be liable to pay council tax?

You're talking quite a bit of sense Smellyloo, although the nomadic life bit would hopefully not be such an issue were legal residential moorings available.

As for council tax, residents here on Thorpe Island used to pay council tax until the council decided that they were exempt. The council tax we would theoretically be paying was then effectively put on my landlords business rates instead, so we pay - albeit indirectly.

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I would imagine the Police would much prefer that Marinas had some residential occupancy, it'd probably reduce theft and vandalism in the otherwise deserted basins.

i can imagine that maybe three residential boats at the seldom used bishops bridge end of

norwich yacht station would really help to make it a much safer place to moor.

the residential boats could have a screen linked to security cameras.

i think this would work well in trouble spots as long as one lone residential boat

isnt used to take this on.

jill

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