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chameleon

High And Dry

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chameleon is out of the water for antifouling and anodes, good thing too there was a lot of electrolysis on the prop and we had to have it fettled and rebalanced just gone back on pic 2

DSCF0057.jpg

DSCF0060.jpg

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I think that’s a result of being in the virtual battery called the wetshed I had  the same issue with my rudder. 

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9 minutes ago, brundallNavy said:

I think that’s a result of being in the virtual battery called the wetshed I had  the same issue with my rudder. 

If that,s the case i think i would deploy a couple of "hanging " anodes, in line of sight ,under the water,ie near to prop and gear, it must be connected to a good earth, engine for example if propshaft is bonded to it, use a heavy insulated copper wire to connect ,or a stainless one, storage is easy if you route it well ,ie thourgh a deck cupboard for example, so when under way you can bung it in cupboard !:default_icon_wave:

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 2 coats of antifoul and by now she should be afloat again, the putty queen now looks like a smurf with all the blue antifoul,pics to follow

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On ‎07‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 09:17, brundallNavy said:

I think that’s a result of being in the virtual battery called the wetshed I had  the same issue with my rudder. 

A good friend of mine had an aluminium boat in a marina at Brundall for a year, huge amount of damage, apparently all attributable to poorly earthed boats moored nearby. 

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Happened to a friend of mine - same cause. He's moored not far from Bondons. His boat had to come out for an unconnected reason a month after it was launched. He was staggered to find there were NO annodes left!

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Think we saw you this morning on the way from St. Benets to Acle? We were on Brinks Omega 

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4 hours ago, Poppy said:

Happened to a friend of mine - same cause. He's moored not far from Bondons. His boat had to come out for an unconnected reason a month after it was launched. He was staggered to find there were NO annodes left!

Obviously a greater problem than some folk realise. I suspect not helped by some totally unqualified DIY installations. 

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My Honda outboard that I kept at Broadsedge used to eat anodes, I would change then at least twice yearly. I made up my own Magnesium ones as a Zinc replacement but these were worse. I spoke to a very helpful chap at McDuff who explained that the use of Magnesium in fresh water means just that. So fresh and clear you could nearly drink it, virtually any pollution or slight salt content like the Upper Thurne and they will be gone in no time. The close proximity of so many boats packed in marinas and construction metal in the water on The Broads means regular anode inspection must be part of your maintenance regime. As an allrounder best to stick to Zinc and not flirt with Aluminium and Magnesium.

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10 hours ago, JennyMorgan said:

Obviously a greater problem than some folk realise. I suspect not helped by some totally unqualified DIY installations. 

Further compouded by the BSS failing to incorporate mains installations as 'obligatory', only 'advisory' :default_icon_mad:

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3 hours ago, ChrisB said:

My Honda outboard that I kept at Broadsedge used to eat anodes, I would change then at least twice yearly. I made up my own Magnesium ones as a Zinc replacement but these were worse. I spoke to a very helpful chap at McDuff who explained that the use of Magnesium in fresh water means just that. So fresh and clear you could nearly drink it, virtually any pollution or slight salt content like the Upper Thurne and they will be gone in no time. The close proximity of so many boats packed in marinas and construction metal in the water on The Broads means regular anode inspection must be part of your maintenance regime. As an allrounder best to stick to Zinc and not flirt with Aluminium and Magnesium.

That begs the question as to how often boats should be slipped. I know that a number of folk slip their boats every two years or more and that some folk haven't done so in years. In a nutshell what damage can be done to a boat once the anodes have gone? I have certainly seen timber boats where fastenings have departed this world and planks have sprung but what about damage to glass boats? 

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Just a thought, is there an environmental cost to having dissolved anodes? Perhaps not a potential issue in isolation but with the concentrations  of boats on the North Rivers or at Brundall there must surely be a discernable zinc content to our rivers? Just curious! 

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13 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

Just a thought, is there an environmental cost to having dissolved anodes? Perhaps not a potential issue in isolation but with the concentrations  of boats on the North Rivers or at Brundall there must surely be a discernable zinc content to our rivers? Just curious! 

"... zinc anodes possess one flaw: When used in brackish or fresh water they are prone to developing a calcareous coating, a whitish material that essentially puts a zinc anode to sleep. "

https://www.cruisingworld.com/how/zinc-and-aluminum-sacrificial-anodes#page-2

I've been using Magnezium for a year or two now, but I'm finding they are dissolving rapidly. More salt tides maybe ?  I'm considering Aluminium when she comes out soon.

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7I never tried aluminium but as you say magnesium just vanished. The beauty of outboard power where anodes are concerned is you can tilt and give them a scrub to remove coating.

The Broads owners tend to follow the hire industry and leave in all year. When sea sailing was my thing I slipped every winter for the duration as did nearly everyone I knew. Helped insurance wise as well.

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Just hope that the Lock is operational!

 

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Looking good there Mike. 

We use aluminium on ‘B.A’  works for us, along with a galvanic isolator

Griff

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