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Low Tide

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Plenty of clearance under Wroxham bridge today. Impossible to read the bottom of the gauge but must be somewhere near the 8ft Mark.

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Standby for the Big fish kill when someone lets all the salt water back in..

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Hopefully no damage sustained to any boats!!

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There's a pic in the other place showing Silverline's yard with their boats sat on the bottom with no water at all.

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18 hours ago, garryn said:

Plenty of clearance under Wroxham bridge today. Impossible to read the bottom of the gauge but must be somewhere near the 8ft Mark.

 

Bloody typical Isn't my boat being ex-hire has got a note on the dashboard saying 7 foot six under all bridges except Wroxham that being eight-foot, I say bloody typical because the boat is now out of the water to be worked on never mind maybe next time it'll be in the water and I can do the Coltishall run here's hoping

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3 hours ago, Cal said:

Hopefully no damage sustained to any boats!!

I was going to ask the question - with boats sat on the mud - presumably with the props and rudders now sunk in the mud - is any damage ever suffered because of this? - or with the mud being very soft - do boats tend to be ok?

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might be worth checking the weed filter next visit, in case everything is bunged up with mud.

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I spoke with Marina, in turn she contacted cove at Brundall. Over the weekend the water was very low.However now all boats are floating.

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Somebody posted a pic on faceache where a Buccaneer 37 had hung on its mooring lines, with the cleat eventually being ripped away from the deck, and with a chunk of moulding with it leaving a gaping hole in the deck.

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We were on the pontoon at OBYS on Saturday night. Probably just as well. OB didn't seem too bad but boats were high and dry on the private moorings at the top of Oulton Dyke. We moored at Somerleyton Sunday lunchtime but I think we were within a whisker of the bottom! 

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4 hours ago, Markw said:

I was going to ask the question - with boats sat on the mud - presumably with the props and rudders now sunk in the mud - is any damage ever suffered because of this? - or with the mud being very soft - do boats tend to be ok?

When I first bought Sunbird, she was moored at Aston's yard at Loddon, on the river side quay. We were regularly in the sticky stuff, and twice had to open the weed filter to de-plug the goo from the bottom of the fitting. But we did find the raw water impeller was missing a few fingers, so that might have not helped! Still, not good to have that mud running through the heat exchanger, though, so if you've been grounded, it might be as well to check that out when you get back to floaty business.

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The keg, I believe that's the correct term, should protect the propeller and rudder while on the mud.

The strong metal "arm" from the end of the keel to the bottom bearing of the rudder.

 

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36 minutes ago, dnks34 said:

Isnt it a Skeg?!

Yet another Scandinavian word which has passed into our boatbuilding since the Vikings first came to Norfolk.

 

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Yes, I know,  :default_gbxhmm: you're going to tell me that the Vikings didn't have propellors!

But they did have skeg (or skaeg) rudders, shipped on pintles and gudgeons, to form a hinge. these are all words that go right back to "middle" English.

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The photo kindly provided by Ray.  The 'Strong Metal Arm' to me seems not to have any support at the aft end unless it is directly in front of the rudder and I can't see it.    It just carries the lower pin for the rudder.  If the lower arm was to sit on the bottom I would deduce that serious pressure from below would push the rudder trapping it between the arm and the underside of the hull.  Having said that it is a good design to protect the prop and rudder from hitting objects in the water or the bottom of the river itself.  'B.A' has a very similar design but with a very strong 'Leg' at the end of the arm just fwd of the rudder between the arm and the underside of the hull where it fastens to the substantial rudder stock  and the end of the keel / hog.  This design means that even sitting on the bottom the pressure cannot squeeze the rudder / pin as per photo,

Griff

 

 

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I almost got it! In my defense I suspect Keg is a word I am more familiar with... especially at this time of year :default_beerchug:

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Not everyone has the luxury of a skeg for protection but settling gently into soft mud shouldn't do any real harm as long as theres no hard lumps under your mooring.

props.jpg

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Griff - that may be an issue if it were to sit on rock and it was bouncing up and down on it for some time, but you have to remember that the rivers in particular generally consist of MUD or at best boggy marsh!!

Remember when they put in Lens new shed they went down about 70' with the piles and still did not hit anything much!!

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10 hours ago, Ray said:

The keg, I believe that's the correct term, should protect the propeller and rudder while on the mud.

The strong metal "arm" from the end of the keel to the bottom bearing of the rudder.

 

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Here we have our keg.

Note the lack however of a skeg!

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Some years we are lucky and have two kegs :default_drinks:

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9 minutes ago, Cal said:

Some years we are lucky and have two kegs :default_drinks:

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Hi Cal

I expected to see at least one beer pump and lines connected to one of the kegs:default_norty:

Regards

Alan

 

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