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Pumpmedic

Anyone Recognise This As A Broom?

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Hi Pumpmedic Does it matter if its a Broom or not, has it been looked after and cherriest, it looks a nice boat But what is the air gap? is it broads compatible you haven't said where you will use it. If the topside is wood beware,  If you like it check the bilges,behind cupboards, by all means get a survey but you will still find issues with any second hand/preowned boat.John

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1 hour ago, Pumpmedic said:

Awaiting confirmation but looking likely to be a Broom one off fitout to customers spec so a Aquafibre not Broom at the moment.

I'm not saying it isn't a Broom fitout, but it does seem pretty odd. If you were getting a yard who were never cheap to build it then why would you not just have a GRP superstructure? To get them to draw up, project manage and construct a bespoke superstucture in ply would surely have ended up costing as much anyway.

It doesn't feel like a Broom interior to me, although it has clearly been done to a reasonable standard. The windows and the overall design really don't look like normal 'Broom' either though.

A real Broom fitout (Aquafibre or production) should have one of these near to the interior helm position.

95013066.jpg

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Just now, annv said:

Hi Pumpmedic Does it matter if its a Broom or not, has it been looked after and cherriest, it looks a nice boat But what is the air gap? is it broads compatible you haven't said where you will use it. If the topside is wood beware,  If you like it check the bilges,behind cupboards, by all means get a survey but you will still find issues with any second hand/preowned boat.John

HI,

All I want is a nice boat of almost any manufacture, however if the seller is making a claim in effort to get a higher price then I need info to negotiate the price towards what I might pay for it. It is broads compatible as far as I am aware  yes and do I need to say where I might use it in this post I think not however I have taken your points onboard.

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1 hour ago, oldgregg said:

I'm not saying it isn't a Broom fitout, but it does seem pretty odd. If you were getting a yard who were never cheap to build it then why would you not just have a GRP superstructure? To get them to draw up, project manage and construct a bespoke superstucture in ply would surely have ended up costing as much anyway.

It doesn't feel like a Broom interior to me, although it has clearly been done to a reasonable standard. The windows and the overall design really don't look like normal 'Broom' either though.

A real Broom fitout (Aquafibre or production) should have one of these near to the interior helm position.

95013066.jpg

According to BOC it was one of the their fit outs and there are a few subtle ways of proving it was a Broom fit out. Forgive me if I don`t share now but I will in time, promise, just ask for time whilst I talk to the seller.

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People have replied to which I want to say thanks or like however the computer is saying "NO!", sorry people and I really do appreciate your time and comments.

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2 hours ago, oldgregg said:

95013066.jpg

A typical example of Broom's attention to detail and tradition.

Notice how, even with a little plastic plaque, the four screws have been "dressed" so that their slots all face the same way. Not easy to do, when screwing self- tapping screws into fibre glass, but some one has taken that bit of extra trouble to do it properly. You will see this sort of detail all over a genuine Broom boat and it is an example of their excellence.

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45 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

A typical example of Broom's attention to detail and tradition.

Notice how, even with a little plastic plaque, the four screws have been "dressed" so that their slots all face the same way. Not easy to do, when screwing self- tapping screws into fibre glass, but some one has taken that bit of extra trouble to do it properly. You will see this sort of detail all over a genuine Broom boat and it is an example of their excellence.

Made me look at our plaque but the photo isnt very clear. I will look closely next time we go to the boat

IMG_8086-1024x683.jpg

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Yes they are, and this is the normal way of dressing them. The tradition comes from making planking repairs to a wooden boat. The boat may have been built with copper roves but repairs are usually done with brass screws. The boatbuilder leaves all the slots horizontal when he has planked up and before filling the holes with putty or with wooden dowels. That way, if the plank ever needs to be replaced again, you can clear away as much putty as possible and push your screwdriver in horizontal, to find the slot and remove the screw.

This tradition is carried on in the fitting out of interiors, so that all the screws in a window frame, in cupboard hinges, on the piano hinge of folding tables, and even on the "feather edges" of Lino covered floorboards, are all "dressed" in the same direction. It is one of the marks of a high quality boatbuilder.

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9 hours ago, Vaughan said:

Yes they are, and this is the normal way of dressing them. The tradition comes from making planking repairs to a wooden boat. The boat may have been built with copper roves but repairs are usually done with brass screws. The boatbuilder leaves all the slots horizontal when he has planked up and before filling the holes with putty or with wooden dowels. That way, if the plank ever needs to be replaced again, you can clear away as much putty as possible and push your screwdriver in horizontal, to find the slot and remove the screw.

This tradition is carried on in the fitting out of interiors, so that all the screws in a window frame, in cupboard hinges, on the piano hinge of folding tables, and even on the "feather edges" of Lino covered floorboards, are all "dressed" in the same direction. It is one of the marks of a high quality boatbuilder.

Hello Vaughan,

To be honest most good tradesmen will always do the same.

Regards

Alan

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In my youth I used to muck around down Bells Boats in Brundall and I used to have to dress the screws BEFORE I glued the dowels in (with the grain running in line of course! ) and to top it all ,then antifoul over the whole damned caboodle - even the fish could not admire my handiwork! I recall that I was not even allowed to do the glueing until they had all been checked!!

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I’ve been dressing screws for years as instructed by my dear old now deserted Dad. I’m not that anal to do it where they can’t be seen though 

Griff

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47 minutes ago, BroadAmbition said:

I’ve been dressing screws for years as instructed by my dear old now deserted Dad. I’m not that anal to do it where they can’t be seen though 

Griff

I'm with Marshman on this one. The 'dressed' screws might not be visible but surely it's no bad discipline to treat them as if they were.

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Dressing screws, wherever, still comes naturally to me! Sadly or anally!!! (Thanks Griff - as they say takes one to....!!! ) :default_biggrin:

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Pumpmedic, suggest that you ask the present owner what the HN (hull number) is and request a picture of the builder's plate, that should settle the question as to whether she's a Broom or not.

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I may be wrong but I don't think CE regulations required a hull number until 1992, so if this hull is 1982 it may not have one.

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Have now looked at the original site advertising the boat. I suggested 35k, I'd go in at 30k tops. Judging by the huge amount of exposed screws and shoddy timber work under the soles/decks she is not a Broom unless she's one that's been rebuilt by a yard other than Broom. The aft cabin structure is very box like thus I would want to know who built that and what of. I do like the logic of the layout and the lack of any unnecessary paraphernalia, personally I would be tempted but I would want a professional survey on this one. A great deal of fancy woodwork, which I like, but not what I'd expect of Brooms. I'd proceed with care.

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May not have proper HIN but I'd have thought it would have a builders number at that age, my princess is 1982 and has a plate with yard no. at the helm.

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12 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

I may be wrong but I don't think CE regulations required a hull number until 1992, so if this hull is 1982 it may not have one.

This is a topic that cropped up several years ago on the Drascombe Owners website. Drascombes were certainly supplied with an HN during the 1970's so I assumed that that would be the case for other boats. However, I too may be wrong!

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3 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

Have now looked at the original site advertising the boat. I suggested 35k, I'd go in at 30k tops. Judging by the huge amount of exposed screws and shoddy timber work under the soles/decks she is not a Broom unless she's one that's been rebuilt by a yard other than Broom. The aft cabin structure is very box like thus I would want to know who built that and what of. I do like the logic of the layout and the lack of any unnecessary paraphernalia, personally I would be tempted but I would want a professional survey on this one. A great deal of fancy woodwork, which I like, but not what I'd expect of Brooms. I'd proceed with care.

Spoke with somebody who knows a thing or two about her last night, very helpful chap he was. Told me what`s what about her and gave me an idea of what to offer as well. All being good I`ll take a journey soon and see up close for myself. 

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4 minutes ago, Pumpmedic said:

Spoke with somebody who knows a thing or two about her last night, very helpful chap he was. Told me what`s what about her and gave me an idea of what to offer as well. All being good I`ll take a journey soon and see up close for myself. 

Good luck! I note in the advert that the hull is grp, as expected. No mention of the superstructure though. Check what the decks are made of too. Re Thornycroft engines, don't think that many Broads boatyards fitted them. Ask the vendor if a surveyor's report is available, he might have had to get one for his insurance company.

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Just a thought, too late to edit, but I am concerned that she might be a rebuild rather than an original Broom. Not to say that a fire damaged boat, for example, can't be refitted and refitted well but I would want to know that. GRP lends itself to some amazing rebuilds but it begs the question, when does a Broom cease to be a Broom. 

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30 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

Just a thought, too late to edit, but I am concerned that she might be a rebuild rather than an original Broom. Not to say that a fire damaged boat, for example, can't be refitted and refitted well but I would want to know that. GRP lends itself to some amazing rebuilds but it begs the question, when does a Broom cease to be a Broom. 

Thanks however I`ve been given pointers to tell if it is a Broom fit out and same for the hull with or without the builders plate after all if people can swap a vin plate on a car then surely the builders plate is a doddle unless I`m missing something which wouldn`t be the first time lol. 

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2 hours ago, JennyMorgan said:

 Re Thornycroft engines, don't think that many Broads boatyards fitted them. Ask the vendor if a surveyor's report is available, he might have had to get one for his insurance company.

I thought that as well. At that time, Brooms were very much a Perkins shop in much the same way that they now fit Volvo (rebadged Perkins for the smaller engines) pretty much as default.

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