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I find myself with a gap in my knowledge,  not for the first time :default_biggrin:

What is a cutlass bearing and how easy are they the replace on a Calypso with hydraulic drive ?

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It's the bearing where the prop shaft passes through the hull. Had one done on a Safari but don't know about a hydraulic drive I'm afraid. 

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Depends how good access is as to how easy it is, will be an out of water job.

I've only done them in P brackets and they fought all the way out using lots of heat and a homemade puller (and a lump hammer).

Probably a couple of grub screws to find on the outside of the tube keeping it in place, the job is easier if you can pull the shaft out first as then you can put a hacksaw blade through the old bearing to loosen it and bend it inwards till you can get grips on it to pull it out.

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It's in the blue big behind the spinny bit!

Not a clue how that's going to come out.

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Chuffin Eck - A subject I actually dare to have a go at answering.

'B.A' has two cutlass bearings.  One where the shaft exits the hull and another un on the bracket fwd of the prop.  The first time we changed both of them back in the restoration days - They were buglers to get out.  The Fwd one was so stubborn we took the outer bearing housing off altogether then proceeded to extract the cutlass bearing on the bench.  New ones were put back in with plenty of coppa slip and new s/steel grub screws (Which in our case are allen key heads - recessed).

Hydraulic drive makes not a jot of difference to a cutlass bearing as the bearing has not a scooby doo what type of gearbox is driving the shaft.

The shaft needs removing otherwise it will really be a sod of a job if not impossible. First job, clean the outside of the housing and check for bolts / set screws etc that might / should be holding the bearing in place - Unless it is an interference fit - Unlikely but not unheard of.  If they won't come out then carefully drill them out taking care not to damage the threads in the housing. Apply releasing fluid of your choice 'Plusgas' imho is about the best.  Then its just a matter of decent punches / drifts and a big hammer.  3/4 drive socket of the correct size can be used as a drift quite successfully.  If it ain't budging then 'lets get heavy man' and heat it up.  If it still ain't moving then it's a hacksaw job to cut a length way groove, this will relieve pressure and give it movement capability and break the bond.  Before fitting new bearing, drill with a flapper wheel to clean up the housing.   plenty of waterproof grease of your choice.  Tap home with softwood and said knockometer.  New s/steel grub screws again with plenty of grease, anti-fouling afterwards.

I have changed both cutlass bearing a couple of years ago now due to normal wear and tear, much easier to change this time round but they still fought me to start with.

Hope this helps,

Griff

 

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When the shaft has been connected to the taper coupling at the forward end for many years then its likely to be difficult to separate the shaft from the coupling. Sometimes hydraulic pullers, heat and in the last instance brute force by way of hammers have failed to release the shaft from the coupling.

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The surveyor has completed his survey , I haven't ever heard of a boat  survey taking 2 whole days to complete,  I can do a 4 bed  house in 4 hours :default_biggrin:

I don't think he has much work on in Kent and has semi retired.

He found a few small things but not bad for a 46 year old boat.

Any rough ideas on the cost of yard doing the replacement,  I never learnt metal work and mechanics.

 

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Not a clue as I always do them mysen as well as the out of water survey (Which I'll be doing in again this coming April)

I suggest you have a ring round for estimates.  Try Robert at Sutton Staithe boatyard

Griff

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The problem I have is it is based on the upper Medway,  boat mechanics are rare down here,  I will be lucky to get one to quote.  :default_sad:

I will give a couple  of Norfolk yards a call to get an idea of cost,  they could come up with any figure down here and I wouldn't have a clue.

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Understood.  Seeing as it is an out of water jobby, what about getting the yard where you have taken her out to give an estimate for the work, or a travelling mechanic - Doesn't have to be a marine one as it is a basic evolution.

Now there's an ideal - Grendel would be able to do this with his eyes shut and he is in your neck of the woods.  Just make him a sensible offer he can't refuse!

You could always sail her to the Broads . . . .  :default_norty:   :default_icon_rolleyes:

Griff

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If this is a Wilds Calypso then it may have an early form of hydraulic drive where the hydraulic motor, thrust bearing and cutless are all one unit, bolted through the back of the keel. There is no prop shaft as such, just a stub shaft for the propellor.

If this is the case, you take the prop off, take out the mounting bolts and the whole thing comes away in two parts. You can then take out the stub shaft and take the outboard part to any garage with a hydraulic press, to change the cutless bearing. The advantage of this type of drive is that it does not need shaft alignment. The disadvantage is that you have to make sure of a good seal when you bolt it back on again!

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Cutlass bearings and their housings can be a pain, there is the cost of the lift at up £400 plus the labour at least say £60 per hour allow two men for eight hours if you are lucky and the cost of the bearing, new shaft or shaft being repaired. 

Any change out of £1000.00 would be a bonus, we have had to do this twice because the first attempt was not a very good job. It had to be repeated the following year in our winter service.

Please see pictures of our cutlass housing and the eight foot long drive shaft showing wear that was stainless welded and machined.

Regards

Alan

 

 

P1020162.jpg

IMG_3432[1].jpg

IMG_3435[1].jpg

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Another way which may possibly help is to remove the shaft (providing it is`nt the stub type that Vaughn mentions), then unbolt the cutlass housing from the keel, and using a "G clamp" and short length of tube or a large enough socket. Place a socket on one side of the cutlass bearing, then put a large socket or short length of tube and a thick plate on the other side (big enough to take the cutlass bearing, then put the G clamp over both sides and then tighten the clamp. It would be better to heat them up first, so heat proof gloves would be advisable.  The same can be done with the bearing in the shaft support at the aft end of the shaft without the need to remove it.

I`d have a look at it myself, but i live in Dorset, so don`t have the time.

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12 hours ago, ranworthbreeze said:

Cutlass bearings and their housings can be a pain, there is the cost of the lift at up £400 plus the labour at least say £60 per hour allow two men for eight hours if you are lucky and the cost of the bearing, new shaft or shaft being repaired. 

Any change out of £1000.00 would be a bonus, we have had to do this twice because the first attempt was not a very good job. It had to be repeated the following year in our winter service.

Please see pictures of our cutlass housing and the eight foot long drive shaft showing wear that was stainless welded and machined.

Regards

Alan

 

 

P1020162.jpg

IMG_3432[1].jpg

IMG_3435[1].jpg

£60 per hour and 16hrs of man time?  Now I know I am doing something seriously wrong, I should only be working one or two days a week on that rate.

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The indications I have had from a couple of Norfolk yards is 4 - 6 hours, £50. for the bearing and £120 if it needs a new prop.

As it is already out of the water for survey  the lift out cost is avoided.

Not quite as expensive as I thought.

Thank you all for your valuable imput.

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