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Jbx5

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No god came along and said, higgy baby where HAVE you been put that down and get home Now. 

 

M

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8 hours ago, JennyMorgan said:

According to a long held Norfolk tradition anything North of Sutton Bridge is up North, anything South of the Vauxhall Bridge is down South. 

In Suffolk proper (Lowstuff don't count) anywhere North of Diss is ''up there".

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On 08/03/2019 at 19:58, Malanka said:

Pay the money to use a properly registered professional transport company and fannies your Auntie. 

Never use a haulier who doesn’t have a CPC certificate. And can show it to you, preferably an international CPC . 

Unbelievable they didn’t have correct escorts flags, mirrors and routing. Very poor show and total amateurs IMO. 

When my brother and myself ran our transport company in the 80s and early 90s this sort of thing would have been a finisher reputation wise. What’s happened to the business it never used to be like this 

 

M

Not wishing to contradict,  but without a CPC (national or international) an operator simply cannot operate as they wouldn't be able to attain an operators licence.  So, for Mr Public to expect to see a copy of your operators licence is really not necessary.  To view your correct insurance, then yes.  There is no preference to having a national or international CPC as the only difference is that you cannot operate internationally on a national licence.  It still requires the same level of competence.

Everything is computerised.  You have to have a CPC to get an operators licence in order to operate a goods vehicle, from an approved operating centre, and you must comply with the maintenance requirements set out by the traffic commisioner. So its not a case now that someone would be able to buy a lorry and just start operating....especially a top spec Scania like Mr Ponsonby, which probably cost in excess of £100,000 just for the truck.  Perhaps some cowboys with a 7.5t vehicle that could be driven on a car licence but not a HGV.

As far as flags?  They don't use them. Perhaps in the military?  His routing would have been authorised when he submitted his notification to all the Police forces and Highways Agencies of the counties he was travelling through.  His problem was mirrors and insufficient escort vehicles.  An escort car front and rear and he would have been fine. 

There was another truck pulled the same day near St Olaves.  He had a Broom 35 European on.  He hadn't notified, he had no escorts, no marker boards or lights etc etc.  He is a cowboy and should have the book thrown at him, I won't name him though.

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5 hours ago, paulyana said:

Not wishing to contradict,  but without a CPC (national or international) an operator simply cannot operate as they wouldn't be able to attain an operators licence.  So, for Mr Public to expect to see a copy of your operators licence is really not necessary.  To view your correct insurance, then yes.  There is no preference to having a national or international CPC as the only difference is that you cannot operate internationally on a national licence.  It still requires the same level of competence.

Everything is computerised.  You have to have a CPC to get an operators licence in order to operate a goods vehicle, from an approved operating centre, and you must comply with the maintenance requirements set out by the traffic commisioner. So its not a case now that someone would be able to buy a lorry and just start operating....especially a top spec Scania like Mr Ponsonby, which probably cost in excess of £100,000 just for the truck.  Perhaps some cowboys with a 7.5t vehicle that could be driven on a car licence but not a HGV.

As far as flags?  They don't use them. Perhaps in the military?  His routing would have been authorised when he submitted his notification to all the Police forces and Highways Agencies of the counties he was travelling through.  His problem was mirrors and insufficient escort vehicles.  An escort car front and rear and he would have been fine. 

There was another truck pulled the same day near St Olaves.  He had a Broom 35 European on.  He hadn't notified, he had no escorts, no marker boards or lights etc etc.  He is a cowboy and should have the book thrown at him, I won't name him though.

Drivers are now required to have a CPC

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2 hours ago, Seagypsy said:

Drivers are now required to have a CPC

The Drivers Certificate of Professional Competence is very different to the CPC required to hold an O Licence, whether National or International. 

The DCPC is required for all holders of a LGV licence and is obtained by completing 35 hours of training over a five year period.  A current LGV licence is not valid without the holder having a current DCPC qualification.

The National and International CPCs are now combined and it is not an easy qualification to obtain, necessitating knowledge of financial requirements, employment law, construction and use regulations, National and EU driving law and a great deal more.

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20 minutes ago, Mouldy said:

The Drivers Certificate of Professional Competence is very different to the CPC required to hold an O Licence, whether National or International. 

The DCPC is required for all holders of a LGV licence and is obtained by completing 35 hours of training over a five year period.  A current LGV licence is not valid without the holder having a current DCPC qualification.

The National and International CPCs are now combined and it is not an easy qualification to obtain, necessitating knowledge of financial requirements, employment law, construction and use regulations, National and EU driving law and a great deal more.

Thank you! I think the introduction of the DCPC has caused general confusion over the difference between that and the traditional CPC.  

As you said, every HGV licence holder has to attend a classroom for 35 hours over a period of time in order to get their DCPC for attending. In theory they could just do 35 hous doing the same module and still get the DCPC.  I've never heard of anyone failing?

The CPC is something totally different and is serious stuff. Without it you simply could not be a transport manager who is the nominated person on the operators licence and as said, it covers every aspect of running a business in transport, in depth.

The DCPC is just another money spinner by the government costing anything from £350-£500 for attendance. It's a tax on HGV licencing renewable every 5 years.

A CPC, once gained is for life unless it's revoked by the traffic commissioner. 

Not that easy to set up and operate a truck in reality. 

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Absolutely agree CPC is essential. 

No disagreement there. All haulers should and perhaps do have one. However having worked and run my own company involved in groupage distribution and storage in UK and internationally I can absolutely assure you that we received hundreds nay thousands of deliveries supposedly by CPC certified hauliers that were: 

unsafe

downright dangerous 

misslabelled

poorly loaded

illegal

All came of course with the correct paperwork that was worth precisely NOTHING.

Quoting regulations and requirements is great but in the real world there’s a jungle out there so please remember reality strikes every time.. 

if that were not the case there would be no need for regulatory bodies would there.

... have a great weekend 

 

M

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1 hour ago, Mouldy said:

The Drivers Certificate of Professional Competence is very different to the CPC required to hold an O Licence, whether National or International. 

The DCPC is required for all holders of a LGV licence and is obtained by completing 35 hours of training over a five year period.  A current LGV licence is not valid without the holder having a current DCPC qualification.

The National and International CPCs are now combined and it is not an easy qualification to obtain, necessitating knowledge of financial requirements, employment law, construction and use regulations, National and EU driving law and a great deal more.

Wow you must have been really unlucky to have been exposed to those types of things so regularly. I've been in transport 35 years now and even in the good old days there were obviously cowboys but not that regularly. Johnny foreigner used to be a bit iffy with the likes of Willi Betz etc but UK hauliers as a rule have always had to run it straight as far as O licences are concerned.  What the driver got up to out on the road was another story but that's pretty much been ruled out now with digi tachos etc. 

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I posted that these deliveries were by drivers with certs from firms with certs, all the owner drivers we dealt with were great, neat trucks careful supervision of loading ( I was the FT driver too)

What left our warehouse was on the money. What arrived as groupage was a completely different story.

Illegal imports from the United Arab Jamihyria (Libya) from South Africa (when NM was still in his cell) machine parts were diamond drill bits heading to Scotland, bags of PVC we’re going to the Dunlop factory to make tennis shoes. We transhipped them to tankers. None of that cared two hoots for CPC or any of it.

When it left us it was pucca, not so when it arrived. This was mostly in mid 80s and early 90s. We had fun...... 

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I assume a lot of stuff came on containers although we used to get a lot of middle eastern drivers/firms over here too and T Forms and clearances through agents were a nightmare being clogged up by these non English speaking drivers whose note's weren't correct. I used to do alot of continental in the late 80''s and understanding the procedure with regards customs clearance was a nightmare when I first started. .....could relive those days now when Brexit happens!

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How did you guess lol yup containers. Bane of our lives, 3 million yellow dusters in 230kg metal banded bails in a twenty foot container and the fork truck died on hottest August Saturday morning for years, 17 tons total out, round,  and back up inside by hand !! Wrecked my trapezius muscle right side. Still wrecked to this day, me and depot hydrocortisone are old friends. 

Plod made our lives hell too. 

 

M

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