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SteveDuk

When Did People Become Scared?

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23 minutes ago, SteveO said:

but would be grateful if one of the mods with better editing powers than me could remove the last line of my previous post

done

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3 hours ago, SteveO said:

If I was a hirer, I would question the wisdom of spending 2 days of your precious holiday looking at mud banks and counting ruined windpumps when you could be exploring the delights of the Northern or Southern systems. 

I have to take issue with that! For those who are prepared to look there is just so much to see, from those ruined windpumps to the masses of wildlife.

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7 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

I have to take issue with that! For those who are prepared to look there is just so much to see, from those ruined windpumps to the masses of wildlife.

Peter, I think it also depends on which boat you are on. The all on one level boats tend to have just a view of the Reeds for miles and nothing else, made worse by crossing Breydon at low water.

Centre cockpit boats and other designs have the benefit of being able to see over the reeds.

I've also mentioned it before, that I have made the crossing at slack high water and it gives an all together different perspective of the rivers, but for obvious reasons, I would always suggest people cross as advised at low slack water unless they are in their own boat and confident of bridge clearances and their abilities etc.

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We've always used the run between stokesby and GY as a good time for showers as there's plenty of hot water and it will be hot again by the time we arrive on the other side.

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3 hours ago, oldgregg said:

He's not saying they're wimps

No, that was me :default_biggrin:

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20 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

I have to take issue with that! For those who are prepared to look there is just so much to see, from those ruined windpumps to the masses of wildlife.

Yep, and I also enjoy the challenge of piloting the boat through GY and Breydon. On Breydon I love pushing the throttle further forward than I can anywhere else and feeling the boat bounce along. For me it's not wasted time in the slightest. 

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10 minutes ago, Smoggy said:

We've always used the run between stokesby and GY as a good time for showers as there's plenty of hot water and it will be hot again by the time we arrive on the other side.

Smogs, this is exactly what we do :1311_thumbsup_tone2:

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1 hour ago, EastCoastIPA said:

Peter, I think it also depends on which boat you are on. The all on one level boats tend to have just a view of the Reeds for miles and nothing else, made worse by crossing Breydon at low water.

Centre cockpit boats and other designs have the benefit of being able to see over the reeds.

Perfectly valid point of view (see what I did there? :default_smile:) Whenever people seek advice on buying a boat, especially a first boat, the most general comment is "try as many types as you can" This helps ensure a good fit for needs as well as wants (and avoids conscription into the Three Boats in a Year Club :default_rolleyes:)

All on one level boats are not for everyone but no type of boat is, otherwise we would not have the pleasure of admiring the ones we like as we cruise. In praise of the all on one level I would like to say that the helmsman is the only one who can't be on deck while cruising, everyone else can be just as high and see just as much as from similar sized aft and mid helm boats. A couple sharing a boat are alternately helming or sight seeing. Also in poor weather everyone is warm and dry while cruising. In good weather the amount of sliding canopy, doors and windows you can open in different configurations leaves you feeling as much "outside" as any style of cockpit. Finally that low level view lets you see things easily missed from higher cockpits, especially in terms of wildlife, it's not a restricted view, it's an extra view!

I could go on... the point I wanted to make was not that they are better or worse than higher helm positions they are just different and the idea that you just see reed beds either means you haven't tried it or if you did then it wasn't for long enough to appreciate the possibilities. Of course they're not to everyone's taste but sometimes being able to see over reed beds just means you can see the top of reed beds!

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25 minutes ago, Ray said:

I could go on... the point I wanted to make was not that they are better or worse than higher helm positions they are just different and the idea that you just see reed beds either means you haven't tried it or if you did then it wasn't for long enough to appreciate the possibilities. Of course they're not to everyone's taste but sometimes being able to see over reed beds just means you can see the top of reed beds!

One thing I would add to that is that when you go through the 'dreaded stretch' between Stokesby and Yarmouth it is noticeable how much more you see on a high-level dual steer than even some centre-cockpit boats (and obviously bathtubs, therefore) and it really does make the landscape considerably more interesting.

The other benefit is that because you can see for such a long way ahead it makes taking the 'racing line' on corners just something that you do and so even at a sensible speed (before anyone picks me up on that!) you make better progress.

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1 minute ago, oldgregg said:

The other benefit is that you can see for a long way ahead which makes taking the 'racing line' on corners more sensible so even at a sensible speed you make better progress. 

Till you find Ray coming the other way hidden alongside the reeds. :default_coat:

I fully agree with Ray though, all boats have their plus and minus points, some even have rags and sticks. I think for me the perfect boat doesn't exist because I would want the helm as high as possible, be completely draft free when inside and able to pass under Potter bridge at any time. The best all round compromise for me is the centre cockpit sliding canopy.

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7 minutes ago, EastCoastIPA said:

Till you find Ray coming the other way hidden alongside the reeds. :default_coat:

But that's the point - On a boat like Commodore you can see what is there very clearly and that's not quite the case on Broadsman, for example.

The extra couple of feet makes a huge difference. Height-wise you're effectively stood on top of the rear coachroof of a tall centre-cockpit boat.

I do agree, though, a centre-cockpit is the best all-rounder for the system.

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I've seen the boat you are talking about on the trent/witham so it does exist, a huge barge with raised inside helm position that folded back on hydraulics for bridges, a very impressive sight watching it go past as the top went back up.

enigma.JPG

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Not Breydon so much but I had a nasty moment at the Dolfin at Yarmouth once. ( I must have miscalculated the tide) going toward Breydon on a Hampton Safari 25 we stopped dead just like we'd run aground then began to turn around like a  slow whirlpool I managed to get out of the "Spin" by using full throttle but only just and soon was in calm water. with a big sigh of relief! I have remained very respectful of the tide conditions there ever since.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, oldgregg said:

But that's the point - On a boat like Commodore you can see what is there very clearly and that's not quite the case on Broadsman, for example. The extra couple of feet makes a huge difference

This is true, sometimes I have to tie crew to the pointy end to tell me if anything is coming round a bend! I'm always left with the vague impression she doesn't like it... strange! :default_biggrin:

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2 minutes ago, Thiswan said:

Not Breydon so much but I had a nasty moment at the Dolfin at Yarmouth once. ( I must have miscalculated the tide) going toward Breydon on a Hampton Safari 25 we stopped dead just like we'd run aground then began to turn around like a  slow whirlpool I managed to get out of the "Spin" by using full throttle but only just and soon was in calm water. with a big sigh of relief! I have remained very respectful of the tide conditions there ever since.

The tides can be very tricky by that dolphin. I often find if I'm early going South to North and there is still a strong ebb coming across Breydon, you are better off heading down the Yare a little towards the sign that says "no hire boats beyond this point" and then turn there, increase the revs and then motor against the current with good steerage and turn into The Bure fully under control. If you under estimate the strength of the ebb, it is very easy to get pushed towards the piling as you turn into The Bure.

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My perspective on the endless reeds is that of one most likely to be in a sailing boat, e.g. sat near to the water. From that lowly position I see all sorts of living gizmos whether it be otters, grass snakes, rats, pike sunning themselves or the odd seal for example. That, or the heaving, blaring metropolis of Horning? No competition in my mind!

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8 hours ago, tim said:

It might just be my mind playing tricks, but I seem to remember the channel markers being floating buoys rather than posts back then?

I remember one buoy (possibly a temporary replacement for a missing post) in 1963.

My cousin managed to lasso it as we drifted past with a rope round out prop.

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We're visiting the Broads, for the first time ever, in mid-June. We're both approaching 60 years of age but I've always wanted to have a boating holiday on the Broads and have finally got round to visiting. We're hiring from Richardsons in Stalham, and I've read this thread with interest, and have watched  several YouTube videos including nearly all of the excellent and informative Captain's Blog ones.  I fully intended to cross Breydon Water and will still do so. I'll be following the helpful tips on this thread and am really looking forward to it, but will also treat the waters with the respect they deserve. Steady as she goes seems to be the overriding message. 

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13 minutes ago, twowrights said:

Steady as she goes seems to be the overriding message. 

Good advice. You'll be fine! Keep between the posts but be careful where the channel bends particularly just west of Breydon Bridge and as you approach the Yare/Waveney end of Breydon. Its nothing to worry about though. We've done it dozens of times but me and the better half usually keep an eye on each other just in case a lapse of concentration should occur! You've obviously done your homework so it will be a breeze. Do let us know how you get on!

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11 hours ago, RumPunch said:

I'll admit to being intimidated by it, but never really having had long enough to justify going South it is just fear of the unknown. Plus on a boat that only does about 5 kts max under power, with a metre of sticky down bits for the mud to grab and 8m of sticky up bit to drop there are perhaps more areas of concern than a motor boat.

Sail and motor I can comfortably do Hickling to Oulton Broad in a day, RCC or in my Drascombe.

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3 hours ago, webntweb said:

I remember one buoy (possibly a temporary replacement for a missing post) in 1963.

My cousin managed to lasso it as we drifted past with a rope round out prop.

One or two posts were broken or lost due to ice back then so a temporary buoy is quite likely.

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23 hours ago, NorfolkNog said:

Good advice. You'll be fine! Keep between the posts but be careful where the channel bends particularly just west of Breydon Bridge and as you approach the Yare/Waveney end of Breydon. Its nothing to worry about though. We've done it dozens of times but me and the better half usually keep an eye on each other just in case a lapse of concentration should occur! You've obviously done your homework so it will be a breeze. Do let us know how you get on!

Many thanks, we'll certainly let you know how we get on, can't wait for June to come.

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On ‎01‎/‎04‎/‎2019 at 17:46, EastCoastIPA said:

........aim for 60 mins after slack when going South and 90 mins when coming back North. I normally aim for that and it seems to be about right, although to be honest you can easily allow 120mins heading North.

I'd have to agree with that, assuming you have the clearance of course.

"Slack Water Time" is a bit misleading as it may be slack between the yellow post and Breydon Bridge but it will be anything but slack going past the Yacht Station. Maybe it should be renamed "Maximum Clearance Time" Last time we went south to north, at slack water time, the slog up the Bure was...welll...a slog.

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I usually aim for similar. As a result of the 'under tow' (thanks Vaughan) the river level will rise on the Bure so best not to leave it too long if clearance is an issue. North to South isn't too bad but a short delay will certainly ease passage going South to North. 

Having said all of this it might be better not to divert too wildly from the slack times. 

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