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EastCoastIPA

Cpap Usage And Cold Weather Boating

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I seem to remember from previous discussions on here that one or two other members may also use CPAP machines when boating. A friend of mine who often joins me on the boat has recently started to use a CPAP machine, however on the last couple of visits to the boat in cold weather has had an issue with the build up of condensation inside the tube and mask. This last weekend we spent two night afloat and on the second night we plugged into shore power and he wheeled an electric radiator into his cabin and found that keeping the cabin warmer and dryer over night really helped.

We have never really worried in the past about having to find shore power when out and about from the marina, and certainly never been put off from venturing out at any time of the year. My friend is keen not to become a fair weather boater, or too reliant on seeking out shore power. So I was wondering if there were any others that use CPAP machines and any tips or hints they can share on how they cope with their machine on the boat, particularly in relation to cold or damp weather usage?

I don't know the make or model of the machine, but understand it does have a humidity setting? or something you can adjust so that it doesn't dry the mouth and throat out overnight. Perhaps turning this off, or down may help? We have checked and found that the mains power pack that comes with it, outputs 24V at 3.7A which is fortunate as my boat also has 24V on board, so this past weekend we have fitted a cigarette lighter socket in the front cabin and plan to make up a corresponding cable so that he should be able to power the machine directly from the boats batteries, rather then using the invertor, or seeking out shore power for the machine alone. However if it turns out there is a need to run an electric rad over night then shore power may well still be a requirement when it is inclement.

Any suggestions or tips are appreciated.

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I know nothing about Cpap devices but I do know a little about power supplies. The "cigarette lighter" socket is not the best style if what you are plugging in depends on a good contact. I hope somebody  with better knowledge comes along soon.

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I think most boatyards want to know if you are using one of these, mainly so that they can prioritise any engineer to you if you have battery problems.

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Hi you can get a dehumidifier that fits to some cpap machines this does help in most conditions hope this helps


Sent from my iPhone using Norfolk Broads Network

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I'm a relatively new CPAP user and not yet used on a boat yet . Will be following this thread for tips

Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

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I have used mine for a while now. I have a battery that I can run it off, last two nights. I can charge that from 12 volt supply and when ever is restaurant or yacht station I top it up with 240 supply. If I can get electric hook up I use 240 all night. Works a treat.

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Hi I use a coke can inverter with mine with a chin strap uses 1 1/2 amps approx without vaporizer, disconnect vaporizer not necessary if used with chin strap, i have used coke can with both old model and new one no problems, vaporizer uses a lot of power basically a miniature electric kettle, they will blow water if filled to high ok in house but boats rock. i plug mine into a 2 amp three pin 12v socket. cig lighter sockets have a lot of play and easily lose contact, try using a lolly stick to weg tight or tie down with string. John

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I used a cpap regularly on Lightning. I had to use the humidifier as I have extreme problems with dry mouth and throat - using a chin strap didn't really alleviate the problem.

If you can warm the cabin with an oil heater it should help with "rainout" (condensation build up in the cpap to mask tube). Also a cpap tube cover may help.

You can also buy a heated hose for some cpaps which should help.

Of course all this uses battery power and if you can't get a hook up you are going to need a good size battery bank if you want to use the humidifier.

I used a lower humidifier setting than normal, with a tube cover and made sure the cpap was lower than my sleeping position with the tube rising up from the cpap to just about head height. I still got the occasional "shower" - but my wife was usually asleep so wasn't troubled by the odd obscenity.

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Kathy uses a CPAP on board, we run it through the inverter on the domestic bank of 3 x 110 amp batteries. She uses the humidifier but turns it down when its cold. The best thing we found was a home-brewed sleeve over the tube, knocked up from a cheap fleece throw, also bring as much of the hose under bedclothes as possible. She's just advised not to overfill the water reservoir as well.

 

 

 

 

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Thank you for all your replies so far. I think we are covered on the electrical side of things, we have enough power on board to either power the machine via the invertor, or directly off the battery, but where we would struggle is in keeping an oil filled rad going all night unless on shore power.

I shall pass on all the tips, especially the ones about insulating the hose and perhaps looking at a heated hose option.

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