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Broads01

When The Tide Is In Control

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I'm well aware just how strong the tidal pull can be, especially around Great Yarmouth and south of it. At Reedham in particular there are warning signs about turning close to the bridge and even at Potter Heigham boats have been sucked side-on into the bridge more than once, possibly when wind has made things worse. 

I'm wondering, if I ever got myself in such a mess that I was losing the boat to the tide and wind and I had seconds to rescue the situation before disaster, what should I do? 

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Lots of throttle is usually the answer, so many get in trouble because they panic and slow right down where a good fistful of throttle would have regained some control.

Hard reversing is rarely a good way out of trouble as it takes so long to have any effect.

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This is where bow thrusters can come in handy too. They're a good get out of jail card. For example turning in a strong tide can be greatly assisted with bow thrusters at the likes of St Olaves and Reedham. 

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4 hours ago, Broads01 said:

 and even at Potter Heigham boats have been sucked side-on into the bridge more than once, possibly when wind has made things worse. 

Yes Potter with an under-powered or poorly-handling boat and a strong wind is not fun. @Dan has seen me get it wrong there in a Bounty bathtub.

Certainly a thruster coupled with the normal helm hard over and lots of revs routine does make a difference, though Broads cruisers (particularly modern hire boats) don't have the power to turn quickly in a strong tide.

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Plan to use the tide, it can be amazingly helpful. 

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24 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

Plan to use the tide, it can be amazingly helpful. 

Well indeed, but if caught out by the tide and with not enough horses then there is a problem.

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1 hour ago, JennyMorgan said:

Plan to use the tide, it can be amazingly helpful. 

That is always the best plan but I think this is more about when it's gone pear shaped due to lack of forward planning, or more likely another boat appearing through a bridge at last moment.

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2 hours ago, Smoggy said:

That is always the best plan but I think this is more about when it's gone pear shaped due to lack of forward planning, or more likely another boat appearing through a bridge at last moment.

Exactly the situation I'm interested in, the worst case scenario where tide, wind and poor judgement combine to get you in a pickle. 

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Exactly as been suggested, helm hard over, throttle to maximum.

A boats hand brake turn.

If you have thrusters and (time) use them.

 Helm over to the side that gives maximum space to turn never mind the right or wrong side of the river.

paul

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Ludham is the place for other boats suddenly appearing! We last went through in February, no other boats but I was surprised at the power of the tide/flow through the constriction and found I needed a lot more throttle to keep a good, straight passage than I have ever needed there before. Had another boat emerged at the last minute it would have become 'tricky' to the point of being 'interesting'

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That’s why I always use the horn in the approved fashion. I always give way to downstream boats. 

 

M

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I use the horn too, anything that helps others to know I'm there. I generally just always give way if at all possible. Nine times out of ten no one knows who should/could give way so I take the most cautious view.

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if your's being dragged toward something and you have insufficient power.  drop the mud weight..(and keep the power on..)

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