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Jono

River Bure

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You would be surprised Marshman, to find how accurate not only mapping but local information in the 1700s was.  Maps have always been persuasive and used to settle disputes. For example, in 1553 locals of a village in Surrey drew a map of the town's field system in order to allow "the more playne manifest and direct understondying". Because maps also confer power, quality in cartography was essential. A good map not only lets you navigate, but it's also a means to wage war, collect taxation and information on the population.

As for getting out and about Daniel Defoe, he of Robinson Crusoe fame published his book and accompanying maps 'Tour Through the Whole Island of Great Britain between 1724 and 1727. Defoe was not only a writer but also a businessman and a spy. Talking to the locals was an essential part of cartography and his tour contains detailed information not only on individual families but also details of their trade and business. As he passed through Norwich "a weaver of Norwich, gave me a scheme of their trade on this occasion, by which, calculating from the number of looms at that time employed in the city of Norwich only, besides those employed in other towns in the same county, he made it appear very plain, that there were 120000 people employed in the woollen and silk and wool manufactures of that city". 

 Of course, map makers do get things very wrong. The River Ant is a good local example. Its name isn't the River Ant. It's the river Smale. However some jolly mapmaker in 1781, I did do the research but can't find the link, couldn't find a local to ask...so decided on a whim to rename it and call it the Ant. I'm wondering if he was an ancestor of another famous renamer of the Broads! :default_norty:

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Probably because it's source is in Antingham. The source now is normally taken as Antingham Ponds however I think these were created as mill ponds. Smallburgh is derived from Smale apparently, and some years back when dredging, cobbles were found next to the pub where the "Ford" in Wayford was.

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Were Antingham ponds the water source for the N. Walsham and Dilham canal? I never new they were the Ant/Smale river source.

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I will take all that as “Burr” then cos’ that is what I prefer. 

Learn’t so much though!

J

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1 hour ago, Regulo said:

Were Antingham ponds the water source for the N. Walsham and Dilham canal? I never new they were the Ant/Smale river source.

Yes, as I understand it the Upper Ant was "Canalised" to create the NW&D canal.

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