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DAVIDH

A Spring Sojourn

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Saturday 13th April

I arrived in Horning around 2pm after a fairly uneventful drive from Leeds. Goosander was looking sparkling and the previous “occupiers” had done a great job in leaving her looking ***** and span. It was dry but with a chilly wind which was keeping the temperature down to around 10c. I stepped onboard and put the heating on to warm the place up before unloading the car. My key appointment today was to attend a screening of the football match between my team, Leeds Utd and Sheffield Wednesday at 5.30pm. I had decided to drive back to the Kings Head in Wroxham to watch the match so in the interim, I grabbed a late lunch at The Ferry Inn, Horning, primarily because it was just a short walk from the moorings. I went for the carvery and whereas the food was plentiful, it could have been hotter! Soon enough it was time to make my way back to Wroxham to watch the match. I found myself in the company of 10 other Leeds fans all wishing for a good performance. We won the game so this was the perfect start to my holiday. I got back to the boat around 8.30pm and after a wander around Richardsons yard, which is just opposite where Goosander lives, I decided to stay put for the night. The temperature dropped close to freezing so having an electric hook-up for additional heating was a bonus. More tomorrow.

Looks like Richardsons bought at least three of the ex Faircraft boats, as these two were awaiting their new uniforms. More images tomorrow. 
 

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Sunday 14th April

Bright sunny mornings usually follow clear frost nights and so it was today. I opened all the curtains to get the sun streaming through the windows to warm the cabins. After a welcome morning cuppa, it was down to breakfast, which was to be full English as befits the first morning afloat. This being the week leading up to Good Friday and Easter, I guessed it would be fairly busy out on the rivers. My overnight stop was to be Sutton Staithe, which can be busy at times so I left my moorings at 10am with a lunchtime stop at Ludham Bridge planned. A strong wind made me wonder what it would be like at Ludham Bridge which suffers from brisk cross-winds at times. I was fortunate as on arrival, the breeze had dropped and I was able to pick a mooring on the left-hand bank, just beyond the bridge. After a homemade lunch, I strolled to the little shop for a browse and a newspaper, and then on towards the Dog public house, which seemed well patronized. I wanted to get away around 1.30pm to ensure I had a good chance of a mooring at Sutton, before the Richardsons Monday morning returnees arrived. So I retraced my steps and cast off from the now filled moorings. As I cruised by, I spied Sherz and Linz (Youtube holiday blogs) walking on the left bank. I called over to ask when we could expect their next Broads video and was told it would be soon. I didn't see which boat they were on.

On arrival at Sutton Staithe, I could see there were multiple moorings available and as nobody had been following me, I decided to cruise on down to the Green to see if I could bag a space near to an electric point. There was space just in front of an old woody so I approached slowly and drifted alongside. The stern was still out so I kicked it in with forward gear – at which point the bow started to drift out. Deft use of the bow thruster brought it back alongside. I had made a bit of a mess of it but only I would know! After tieing up, the chap in the old woody came over to me to say “it was good to see someone using the bow thruster in the way it was intended”. I said thank you and decided not to tell him it was to correct my heavy-handed throttle use. But that got me thinking that this is a good way of coming alongside. A short burst forward so that the stern comes alongside first, then use the bow thrusters to bring the bow in. This was now my principle mooring method for the rest of the holiday.

I guessed it prudent to book a table at the Sutton Staithe Hotel so I called in to make a reservation for 6.45pm, on my way to a walk along the road from Sutton to Stalham town centre. The sun was out and the breeze had dropped so it was a pleasant amble. I popped into Tesco after walking through Richardson's boatyard, then wandered down the main street before returning the way I came, arriving back around 5pm. After a rest I was making my way to the Hotel for an evening meal, which was delightful. I did not realise it at the time, but it would turn out to be the best I had on holiday. I went for a homemade chicken and mushroom pie, which was chock full of juicy tender chicken pieces. For afters I went for a Toffee cheesecake with ice cream which was so good, I am thinking about it now and willing it onto my plate now I am back home. I stayed there until around 8.30pm before retiring to the boat for the night. I had hooked up to the electricity supply so the boat was warm and cosy. Lets see what the weather is like tomorrow!

Notice the dog sitting on the board

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From Ludham Bridge facing towards the Bure

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Five of Richardsons best still awaiting hire

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That cheesecake - I had already eaten some of it before I decided to photograph it

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We found the food to be extremely good at the Sutton Staithe Hotel when we were there recently. Would highly recommend.

My use of the bow thruster is similar to yours. Hubby steps off with the ropes when we moor but having the bow thruster gives me that bit of assurance that I can bring the bow back in if it starts to drift out while he gets the ropes tied.

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Monday 15th April.

I awoke a little earlier than the scheduled 7.30am alarm call, so I decided to use the extra time to “break out” the drone so I could get some aerial images of Sutton. The drone is quiet so it did not awaken anyone and it performed admirably in the fresh breeze. A Richardsons Commander was just about to leave the moorings, on its way back to its home for the 9 am handover. The resulting images are below.

My destination for the night was Acle with another stop off for lunch at Ludham Bridge. As such there was no rush to leave the moorings this morning. After a sausage sandwich, I cast off, turned Goosander around and cruised on back down the dyke towards Sutton Broad, which must be one of the narrowest Broads on the system. The wind was fresh now but the sun was shining and it made for a relaxing cruise back to Ludham Bridge. I arrived around 11.15am and at that time, I had virtually the whole of the moorings to choose from. I opted for the space just before the area set aside for yachts demasting. Using my newly learned mooring technique I came alongside smoothly and stepped ashore. The crosswind wanted to take Goosander to the opposite bank but I was too fast for it, having tied the boat up first using the centre cleat. I pulled the boat forward a little so none of the space behind me would be wasted for other people who wanted to moor. It is a pet hate of mine that people waste so much space between moored boats, to the detriment to those who also want to moor. Shortly after, two Bridgecraft boats came under the bridge and moored in the big demasting space in front of my boat. I am sure at least one of them must have seen the “moorings for craft demasting” signs but they decided to stay put.  I remembered that the little shop had copies of “A Broad Experience: Diary of a Norfolk Broads hire fleet at the turn of the century, 1999 - 2006”, which I had seen recommended on the forum a number of times in the past, so I decided to visit the shop to purchase a copy. It was overcast and quite cool so nobody was hanging around outside. I purchased the book and returned to Goosander for lunch. On the way back I noticed an official looking chap talking to the skippers of the Bridgecraft boats. Not sure who he was, as he was not accompanied by a commissioners boat, but soon after, both boats were hauled further towards the bridge so as to clear the demasting section.

I left the moorings at around 1.30pm and made my way down the Ant and onto the Bure. There were not many boats around at this time as this was still the “sweet spot” between handovers. On arrival at Acle, I chose to moor on the Broads Authority side, just opposite Bridgecraft. For a while, I watched the comings and goings opposite as the new hirers were flushed out onto the river. My meal tonight was going to be at the Bridge Inn, so I decided to book a table for 7pm. Initially, there was plenty of room to moor, even outside the Bridge Inn but as the evening wore on, even the moorings opposite filled up. Upon entering the Bridge Inn, I realised booking a table was the correct call. The place was full both in the bar and the restaurant. I had the haddock, peas and chips from the menu, followed by another cheesecake, this time the New York variety – which I was advised is another name for vanilla! The first course was lovely. I was disappointed that though the price of the cheesecake was higher than at the Sutton Staithe Hotel, the portion was about half the size and with just one scoop of ice-cream. My meal finished, I returned to the boat and spent the rest of the evening reading and watching some TV.

I have not seen any mention of these extensive moorings built just before the bridge at Ludham (Bure side). They look as though they are for public use.

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Bridgecraft at Acle

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These two boats, Broom Explorers I think, looked as though they were together. That was one hell of a booking for Brooms - probably £3,000 worth (£5,000 if it were in August) if it was a week booking.

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Sutton Staithe from the air

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Cracking drone stills David. I don't know if Robert at Sutton Staithe boatyard is a member on here but I'm sure he'd be interested in the shots of his empire.

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You can see my current boat and my last boat in the drone images (just the roofs):91_thumbsup:

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2 hours ago, stumpy said:

Cracking drone stills David. I don't know if Robert at Sutton Staithe boatyard is a member on here but I'm sure he'd be interested in the shots of his empire.

Robert is welcome to use them if he wishes. 

 

1 hour ago, Ray said:

You can see my current boat and my last boat in the drone images (just the roofs):91_thumbsup:

Ray, where are the boats - I may have a closer shot. If you can tell me what I am looking for I'll see what I can find.

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There is a jetty in the marina, from left to right in the photos. Stern moored on the jetty side furthest from the camera at the very end to the right by the access channel is Dakota my current boat, black cover. On the same line of moored boats, moving back towards the shore, the next but one is Mara with the bright blue roof, my last boat :default_smile:

Many thanks for having a look for me, I'm in touch with the new owners so I can pass on a photo to them too.

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Ray, these are the closest I got to the marina. I can see the boats you mention. Click on them to get full screen. The boat in the top right-hand corner must have a job coming and going from that space.  Also just noticed how many bathtubs are in the marina.

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Great shots, thanks David :default_beerchug:  I'll have to take the cover off next time though!

I'm not sure I've ever seen that boat coming and going in the top right... I guess the plus side is that's it's really easy to get out! :default_smile:

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Tuesday 16th April
The sun was shining as I awoke. The wind was still a little chilly but not as cold as yesterday.  Today was a bit of a compromise as I always make an out and back overnight visit to Yarmouth when passing through, but I needed time to reach Surlingham so the plan was to leave around 9am for Yarmouth, where I would spend around 4 or 5 hours before departing for Reedham in the late afternoon. I had read on Facebook that Reedham Quay had been full the previous two nights so I would need to ensure I arrived at Reedham at a reasonable time. So it was actually 9.15am by the time the ropes were untied but as the tide was just turning as I left, I would soon make the time up. Soon enough, I was passing the derelict Port of Yarmouth Marina control tower, at which point I called the Yacht Station and asked for assistance as a single-handed sailor when coming in to moor. This was all arranged with the minimum of fuss and 10 minutes later I was turning Goosander around to face the ebbing current and then guiding her into a space adjacent to the Rangers office. Even though low water was still four hours or so away, there was still around 10 feet of headroom should I have wanted to continue on. The rangers made my ropes fast and after paying my £6, I ambled off into Yarmouth town.

First call was for chips at one of the chip saloons on the market place (always a must do!) then onto McDonalds for coffee. Yarmouth was very busy with trippers as the schools were still closed this week. Deciding I wanted to inhale some sea air I walked down to the Britannia Pier, the sea breezes getting stronger as I approached. It was nice to see the sea - well it was whilst trying to squint against the sand being blown in my eyes. I then walked along the seafront eventually coming to the Winter Gardens, next to the Wellington Pier. It is closed now and looking very sorry for itself. I can remember Doreen and I having a cool beer in there one hot day in June some years back and wondering at the Victorian elegance. So sad to see it like this now. I turned back and made my way back to the boat, arriving around 3pm. In the back of my mind was the warning that the quay at Reedham had filled recently so I decided to head off there now in the hope of arriving before 5pm. I started the engine and the Quay Ranger (mooring attendant or whatever they are called) allowed the tide to swing Goosander around on it’s last secured rope before casting me adrift into the current, which by now was negligible. I was fortunate in that it had already started flooding up Breydon Water so the cruise up to Reedham took a little less than 2 hours. Passing under the rail swing bridge I could see there was still a choice of mooring spots so I opted for one towards the Ship Inn end. 

By 7pm, I was on my way to the Ship for an evening meal. It was busy both in the bar and the restaurant, but I still managed to bag a small table close to the bay window overlooking the river. I recalled the many times we had their Steak and Ale Pie here which was always delicious, but no matter how many times I scoured the menu, I could not find it now. Instead I opted for the Ship Burger which came with salad, coleslaw and chips. The meal was filling so no dessert for me tonight (not even cheesecake). After reading my paper for a while, I made my way back to Goosander. I wondered how busy the Lord Nelson was so I walked past the boat and on towards his Lordship. I looked through the window and was taken aback to see just one customer in the place. It could have been a one-off but it would be worrying to see your competitor so busy whilst you are empty.

This came sailing by as I left the moorings at Acle

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Oh I do like to be beside the seaside
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The Winter gardens - now closed

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How it looked in 2007BILD0016.thumb.JPG.cdd35ad6947dbd6fb0dd907a206fa400.JPG

The Yacht Station at Yarmouth

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Breydon Bridge lifting for yachtsDSC03031.JPG

Reedham

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The Old Post office -now a cafe
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Lovely photos. I seemed to recall that someone had mentioned recently about a tea room at Reedham. Is that a new addition this year do you know? And is it by the quay or up in the village please? Might drive over there one weekend. 

And that looks like one of WRC’s new cruisers moored up there too. :)

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Yes Jean, it was Waveney Andromeda moored up and it looked sparkling new. It could only have been a couple of weeks old. I thought the green decal/livery on the white hull looked very smart. The tearoom is where the post office store is - so on the quay. They have converted the front shop part to a tearoom. I believe the post office is still operating.

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I'm very tempted to splash out and hire from WRC next year perhaps, a great chance to get back out on the southern rivers. Their prices are probably above what we would usually pay but that's to be expected with a brand new boat! Thanks for the info about the tearoom too. :default_icon_wave:

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1 hour ago, SwanR said:

I'm very tempted to splash out and hire from WRC next year

Go on Jean, you know you want to :default_biggrin:

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1 hour ago, SwanR said:

Their prices are probably above what we would usually pay but that's to be expected with a brand new boat!

Don't forget that their prices are inclusive of fuel. 

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I had a look at Waveney Pisces for this October and the price came out much more competitively than I expected and much keener than Ferry at Horning. The only reason I didn't pick it in the end was to get more nights aboard with Freedom for a little less money. I'm pleased to say they accept solo hirers with experience (thank goodness some operators continue to see sense). 

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Wednesday 17th April

We were headed for Surlingham this evening via a lunchtime stop at Rockland Staithe. Realising that the Post Office Stores was now a cafe (and a post office which no longer sold papers), after breakfast, I walked up the “Middle Hill” as it is called and made my way to the stores up there. Returning with the newspaper I made ready to depart the moorings around 9.30am. The tide was flowing out gently so holding the last rope. I let the stern of Goosander be pushed around by the current before stepping onboard and reversing out. It was noticeably warmer this morning. The sun was out and the breeze had dropped.  I had rolled back one of the wheelhouse sides so it was a pleasant journey up the Yare to my lunchtime destination. Just as I was about to turn into the short dyke which links Rockland Broad, three large Herbert Woods craft came hurtling out. They had been on the Reedham Quay last night – two of them having to double moor. Anyway,  I thought, better out than in as I cruised the regulation 3 mph down the dyke. I think Rockland Broad is so scenic and seems untouched by the madding crowd. It probably hasn’t changed at all in the last 100 years. Having cruised up to Rockland Staithe many times I knew where to head but it struck me that anyone new to the area would have difficulty finding the Broad exit dyke now as there are no longer any boats moored on the right-hand side. I proceeded slowly on, looking to see if there was any space for Goosander. There was actually plenty of room and I was able to come alongside the moorings so avoiding putting the mud weight down.

There was only a couple of other boats in attendance so I decided to fly the drone again to get some aerial shots. I prefer it when nobody is around to watch. I have an awful fear that as someone is watching me, perhaps distracting me, I will make a horrible mess of the flight and that will be the last I see of the drone. The flight was successful – again the results follow. I wanted to fly closer to the Broad so I started walking down the pathway on the right-hand side of the dyke in the hope it might bring me out at the Broad. It didn’t though as it takes a veer to the right after around 300 metres behind a huge new house/building of some sort which is being built. I carried on for a little while and then just a few metres in front of me, a deer – possibly a muntjac? bounded from the undergrowth on one side, saw me then high-tailed it to the other side. I was also aware of his mate who was about to follow him until he saw me and ran back into the undergrowth, probably hiding until I had passed by. I can honestly say I am not sure who was the most shocked at this, me or the deer, less than 4 feet in front of me.

I returned to Goosander and settled back for a homemade lunch. In that time, a couple of other boats came including a brand new looking Waveney River Centre cruiser named Waveney Andromeda. It could only have been a matter of week, perhaps days old and looked very smart. I had not reserved a mooring at The Surlingham Ferry as it was midweek but nevertheless, I thought it prudent to arrive there before 3pm to ensure a space. Surlingham is about an hour from Rockland so I cast off at 2pm and made my way down the narrow dyke, across the Broad and back out onto the Yare. The sun was shining and it was very pleasant now. I cruised on past Brundall and eventually came upon the Ferry at Surlingham. There were lots of people sitting on the tables outside but only a couple of boats moored. I was able to moor at right-angle to the river, at the end of the new moorings – again avoiding having to drop the mud weight. As luck would have it, I was moored quite close to an electricity post so I thought I would use it to charge everything up and as insurance, if the temperature dropped in the night. I put a £1 card in the slot (unusual as normally you just hold it against the screen) and waited for the credit to show... but it didn’t. I walked into the bar and asked if they sold tokens as I guessed they must be different to the standard ones. It seems you in effect rent a card for £10 of which £5 is refundable on its return, the rest being credit to use. I had no intention of paying £5 for one night’s electricity so I declined. Seeing so many people at lunchtime, I decided to book a table for 7pm and was glad I did as the place was heaving when I entered. Most were locals or perhaps people from Norwich. I chose the Liver and Bacon from the menu an was not disappointed. It arrived all chopped up in a lovely gravy complete with onions. Lots of veg and new potatoes provided the accompaniment. It was delicious. I wanted a dessert so I went for a homemade banana and toffee cheesecake (yes a cheesecake again!) It was gorgeous and I rate this meal as my second favourite of my time on this holiday. The place started to empty as people finished their meals so not many stay for the evening. I returned to Goosander around 8.30pm just as it was starting to get dark. It was forecast to be warmer still tomorrow so that was a pleasant thought to finish the day with.

En-route

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Rockland Staithe
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Waveney Andromeda was following me!

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Looking at the sign I think one hit it!

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The Surlingham Ferry

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All Rockland Staithe from the drone

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The New Inn

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I'm getting the urge for another trip south after reading your log David :91_thumbsup:

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Lovely photos and another great read. :)

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Thursday 18th April
I wanted to overnight in Great Yarmouth at least once on the holiday so the plan to day was to make the journey without stops en-route, which would probably take around 4 hours. The sun was  out and the day did feel warmer. I planned to depart around 9am but still had time to launch the drone to get views of Surlingham. which follow. Warmer sunnier weather always lifts the spirits and after sliding back the wheelhouse sides, I departed the moorings thinking to myself what a pleasant day for cruising it was. Approaching Brundall, I decided to take the “short cut” through Surlingham Broad to see something different. There were a couple of cruisers mud-weighted there, clearly having been there all night. Mid Broad mud weighting has never really appealed much to me but in the glorious sunshine, I couldn’t help think the sights and sounds they will have experienced at sun-down and sun-up would have been special, being away from the main river. I exited the Broad and continued on down the Yare past Cantley and Reedham, where I could see the tide had started to flow out by now. I did not see many boats whilst underway but ended up following Evening Light across Breydon. Approaching the coast, the wind became fresher and provided an exhilarating experience without being scary at all. Just before passing under Breydon Bridge I telephoned the Yacht Station asking for assistance once more. There was room near to an electric post so that was where I would aim for. I told the Quay Ranger that I was on Goosander so they could look out for me, adding that it looks very similar to Evening Light, which curiously was about 5 minutes in front of me. Meeting the River Bure slowed Goosander considerably as she punched through the ebb. I could see the intended mooring spot, together with the Quay Rangers hovering around it so I gently guided Goosander parallel to the moorings , allowing the tide to nudge her alongside. Ropes grabbed and tied, i was secured for the night at 12.45pm.

The moorings were sparsely populated by a few hire-craft. I guessed this was the calm before the storm for the Rangers being as it was Good Friday tomorrow. The chaps said it would be busy Saturday and Sunday but not tomorrow as of course, most of he weekend boaters would not be let out earlier enough to make the Yacht Station. I wandered off into town again after making a salad to eat on-board (I was planning to eat out at the Kings Arms this evening). After a coffee in MacDonalds I continued on down Regent Road until meeting the sea again. This time I turned left and walked along the seafront past the Waterways, which was just being spruced up for tomorrows start of festivities. I walked quite a distance before walking back looking at the hotels and guest houses which overlook the sea. About 30 years ago, Doreen and I spent a couple of nights in one of them and I was trying to work out which one it was. I remembered that it was a twin-linked to another hotel which had an indoor swimming pool, which is what made it look attractive as a proposition in the first place. I worked out it must have been the Palm Court, linked to the Burlington. It was in my thoughts because 30 years ago, it did not live up to expectations. The rooms were old fashioned with very high ceilings  and long windows, and in need of renovation. On our last morning before check-out, I got up and drew back the long curtains to let the light in only for them, together with the curtain rail and the wooden batten they were attached to, to come crashing to the floor. Flummoxed by this turn of events so soon after waking up, I thought about reattaching the batten in some way but was soon dissuaded by the height of the window, which would have needed a set of ladders to reach the top. I was in two minds whether to report the damage to reception on leaving as I did not want to be considered the hooligan of the piece. Doreen persuaded me that it was not my fault and to tell the staff. I did and the check-out girl just thanked me for the information and we departed.  

After making my way back to the boat, I put my (sore) feet up until it was time to go out for something to eat. The Kings Arms is a recent discovery and having enjoyed the food there last year, I decided to return. It was quite busy inside but I soon found a table and studied the menu. What could I have that was a little different to what I had consumed over the week? I went for a steak and onion baguette with salad and coleslaw and  “a handful of chips for an extra £1” The steak was tender and accompanied by the onions, was a treat. The “handful of chips” turned out to be chips in a ceramic (not glass) half pint pot – so quite a portion. I had acquired quite a taste for cheesecake over this holiday (probably wouldn’t have spotted that if I had not highlighted it) so the raspberry and white chocolate variety was ordered and joyfully consumed.  The thing is this meal complete with a drink cost just £13.50. Similar meals across the Broads were coming in at £20, peaking at £24 at the Bridge Inn at Acle. A BARGAIN! After giving the eye to my i newspaper for a while, I returned to Goosander. It was quite a mild night and as no heating would be required, I made the most of the available electricity to charge everything up before retiring for the night.

En-route

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This is what has become of the White Swan in Yarmouth - it is now a fresh fish retailer. So sad!DSC03087.JPG

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Surlingham from the airSurlingham3.jpg

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I like the Surlingham shots. I never realised there was a side on spot where you were moored. 

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23 minutes ago, Broads01 said:

I like the Surlingham shots. I never realised there was a side on spot where you were moored. 

Its right at the upstream end away from the pub. A bit quieter although the posts are a bit rustic!

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28 minutes ago, NorfolkNog said:

Its right at the upstream end away from the pub. A bit quieter although the posts are a bit rustic!

They are. That's why I in effect stern-moored - so I didn't have to rely on those flimsy posts!

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Friday 19th April
Today the plan was to return to my home mooring for the overnight, with a stop at Acle again for lunch. The weather forecasters were correct (for once). I had awoken to a beautiful sunny day. Yarmouth is always a little cooler being situated on the coast but the temperatures this morning defied the convention. Needing a paper before departing, I walked to the same road the Kings Arms is on, where a petrol station was able to supply me with my update to the world. and was back at the boat 10 minutes later. So all pre-flight checks completed I prepared for take-off. Well, I actually asked the Yacht Station guy to cast off my last rope so Goosander’s bow would nose out into the slowly ebbing tide. I departed Yarmouth Yacht station for the final time this holiday and cruised up past the forlorn looking Marina, and out into the marshes. Today was Good Friday but the rivers were quiet down this far at least.  By the time I was passing Stracey Arms (funny how we still call it that even though there is no pub there now) the tide had started to flow in so it was assisting my passage. Stokesby came and went and not long after, the moorings of the Bridge Inn came into sight. Now that was a rare phenomenon. Not one boat was moored there. I declined the temptation though as I had plans to come alongside at the Broads Authority moorings just past the bridge again. There were two spaces, either side of a moored hire boat.   I chose the nearer side as it was just before the cafe moorings and I thought it would be interesting to see the comings and goings. Just as I headed over, a small private boat made it clear he was going to nab my space first. Well, there was plenty of room behind the hire boat, and the Norfolk air had a calming influence so I just re-adjusted, turned into the flow and came alongside. “We won’t make a drama out of a crisis” – remember the insurance advert? I always thought that should say “We won’t make a crisis out of a drama” but what do I know. It was still only around 11.15am so I just sat and watched the passing river traffic for a while. I had decided I was going to have a salad lunch on the boat, partly to justify the level of food I had brought with me, so as the sun was shining, I decided to have a refreshing lager shandy sat outside the Bridge Inn. This was very pleasant. The moorings by now were partly filled, with a couple of spaces for stragglers. A walk along the riverfront revealed that the charge to moor is back to £5 for overnight. I am sure it was £10 last summer. Pedro’s beyond the bridge were still charging £10 by the way.

After a long lazy lunch and some spectator sport, I cast off around 4 pm and made my way towards Goosander’s pad. The further along I cruised, the busier the rivers became, so much so that by the time I reached the outskirts of Horning, I was in a line of boats all sedately cruising along. A largish cruiser behind me decided to overtake on one of the bends. I considered he probably thought it wise to get in front of me in the event there was a scarcity of available moorings in Horning. I waved him past and felt smug knowing for once that my mooring was preserved. Nobody else could have it no matter what time I arrived.

By 6 pm, I had snuggled into my mooring and was preparing to go out for an evening meal. I decided it would have to be the Ferry (TFI) again as I needed time when I came back to prepare for my abdication the next morning. A long walk from the other side of Horning would take valuable time out of my preparations. So I walked around the to Ferry noting that the outside was filled with throngs of people all enjoying the late sun. The moorings were full by the way with a couple of boats double moored, though none were stern moored. As so many were outside, I had a choice of where to sit inside. I looked at the “hot serving area” and noticed a rather nice looking steak and ale pie. This together with potatoes and veg from the carvery made a nice HOT meal. The only criticism I will make is that the roast potatoes had been under the heat lamps so long, they had almost dried out and were crunchy to eat. A vocalist was bringing in her sound equipment as I ate, and under normal circumstances, I would have stayed as I enjoy live music. However, the cleaning and extricating my belongings from Goosander rigmarole was playing on my mind so I declined the entertainment. I headed back to the boat, did some packing and what cleaning I could feasibly carry out without dirtying it up again in the morning, then sat back and read for the rest of the evening. Last (shorter) installment tomorrow.

Busy at Yarmouth as I prepared to leave

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Stokesby free mooringsDSC03104.JPG

Bridgecraft at AcleDSC03106.JPG

The newly opened Dunes River Cafe opposite BridgecraftDSC03107.JPG

Lovely spring flower display outside The Bridge Inn, Acle.DSC03117.JPG

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