Jump to content
  • Announcements

    Welcome! New around here? Take a look at the New Members' Guide for some pointers.

    Not a member yet? Sign up here and you can soon be chatting away with friends old and new..

    Check out our Handy Information section if you're after something quickly!

  • If you would like to support the forum, please consider visiting the forum shop, where you can purchase such items as NBN Burgees, Window Stickers, or even a custom Limited Edition Wooden Throttle Control Knob

    Forum Shop

NorfolkNog

A Couple Of Pubs From The 1970's

Recommended Posts

IMHO the only beer Tolly Cobbold brewed of any merit was the bottled offering Tolly 250 which was a stronger ale , the last time I drank this was in the early 80’s and it tasted a bit iffy so I checked the best before date to discover it was two years past .

the draught Tolly was considered to be best described as like  making love in a boat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NorfolkNog said:

Can't see Ron on the Norfolk Pubs data base although it's listed as being owned by Fowlers of Oulton Broad by 1975 and Michael George Whyles being landlord 1975 to 1978 when a Terence Abbot took over.

I was an eighth part of Fowlers. As a company we bought the pub from Ron, can't remember the exact date though. Mike eventually became the licencee but he was employed as the manager. Terry Abbot bought the company and, for whatever reason, put his own manager in rather than keep Mike and Andy on. Just a thought, whilst Ron might have been the front man he might have sold it under a company name. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, CambridgeCabby said:

 the draught Tolly was considered to be best described as like  making love in a boat

Must have been a magical brew then!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, ChrisB said:

So from your link this was how The Ferry was when it suffered a direct hit in 1941 killing over 20. I think it was attributed to a German bomber not finding target and having to unload before the return crossing of the North Sea and subsequent landing.

Screenshot_20190627-173627.thumb.png.6192e3a5a3dbd4a0e57ddfdfd2a3f1e6.png

The Germans announced they had Bombed a major  boatyard, (Probably Herbert woods Potter Heigham) it's actually thought the Bomber saw the lights of a car arriving illuminate the side of the Ferry inn and dropped them.  22 died and 4 were injured.

It used to be that you could stilll see the half moon shapes in the river bottom on the hydrgraphic survey, but with dredging going on in the area last year I'm not sure thats still the case..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last but not least the superb Locks at Geldeston. Again featuring the ubiquitous Tolly Cobbold ales. This was before the new extensions were built on either side and when it could truly be described as an unspoilt rural gem! It would probably be when Walter Coe was landlord.

As an aside I see that Colin Smith had been at the pub for 14 years, such a shame.

Locks.jpg

Locks sign.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • NBN Mobile App

    Want to use NBN when you're out and about?

    Get our mobile app for Android and iOS!

    Get it on Google Play

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

For details of our Guidelines, please take a look at the Terms of Use here.