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grounded

The Kiwis Have Landed

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Well, we arrived at Richardsons boatyard at 1pm on Friday 28th June via taxi from Norwich airport (Goldstar taxis, thankyou Robin). Swan Rapture was ready to go and Richardson's staff were super efficient.

First impressions of the boat? She is a little frayed around the edges but well fitted out and very comfortable. I don't think i have ever had a more responsive helm. A joy to drive. First night at Ludham Bridge. A bit of a shaky first mooring but we made it ( with a bit of bow thrusters) then an evening at the Dog Inn. Saturday morning found us at Womack Staithe (we love that place) and then on to Ranworth for a special family occasion tomorrow. Evening meal at the Maltsters (steak and kidney suet pudding, or a well disguised mudweight).

Now for an evening fish and a good red wine. So far the fishing has been high in quantity but a tad low in quality, apart from a huge eel which would have brought a pretty price gack home.

I have my NBN stickers on my windows but my attempts to fly my New Zealand flag have come to nought. 

We are here for almost three weeks so give us a wave if you see us or say hello. 

So glad to be back.

Chris.

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Looking forward to reading more as and when you can post. That’s a long way to have come so I hope you enjoy the boat and the rivers. You certainly seem to have found summer!

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12 hours ago, grounded said:

Saturday morning found us at Womack Staithe (we love that place)

Me too! Hope you have a great holiday aboard.

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Hi Chris/Grounded. We will be heading to the southern broads from this

coming Friday(5th) till Friday(12th) but mostly up the Yare, so if you are

that way then we will keep an eye out for you. We will be in two private

boats, An Aquafibre Diamond 35(green&white) and an Aquafibre Pearl

38(brown&cream) so easily spotted. No NBN flags flying though.

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Hello again. Boat wifi has been very miss and miss so reliant on pubs (not too hard). We had our family gathering on Malhouse Broad and then a gentle toby up to Sutton Staithe with the Yorkshire branch as they are heading North tomorrow morning. We will then be on our own to revisit many happy places at a leisurely pace.

Now sat in the Sutton Staithe Hotel with a pint of Trawler Boys (being a Hull lad, what else could it be) and waiting for pork and cider pie (wwhich started off as steak and ale).

Not sure where in the morning, perhaps just follow our noses but the prospects of getting through Potter Higham Bridge are looking good so we will be up to the Pleasure Boat Inn at some point.

Ah, here comes dinner.

Cheers

Chris

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1 hour ago, grounded said:

prospects of getting through Potter Higham Bridge are looking good 

The water does seem very low at present so you could be lucky. 

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1st July. Our 47th wedding anniversary. Meant to be a special day, and so it proved but not in the way we expected.

We were moored ( anchored?) At the first mooring on Sutton Staithe with our family members on Fine Gem 3 just ahead of us. I was dangling a maggot, as is my wont, when around 8am i chanced to look astern and saw a double-decker bus sized island of weed bearing down on us. My brother-in-law and i managed to fend it off our boats but there was no stopping it and it plugged the broad like a cork in a bottle. See pic. I rang Sutton Staithe boatyard who said he would wait for his mate, then i rang the BA and got the answerphone, so i then rang Richardsons. Eventually a chap came with a tow boat and broke it up and shephered it out of the way. Then we headed for Neatished when the real story begins. However we are in the White Lion and i am getting the evil eye. No wifi on the boat so more tomorrow if i can find a pub...

Chris

20190701_194600.jpg

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Congrats on your anniversary... I await the rest of the story of your day with interest!

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Kia ora. Now using mobile hotspot(not bad for an old un). Anyway, to continue. We lefy Sutton Staithe with the intention of tootling to Gayes Staithe and an evening meal at the White Horse Inn.

We were about half way across Barton Broad when the engine alarm screamed at me. I immediately turned of and adoptef a look of confused panic. Looking out of the window i could see the wind, 10 or 15 knots (blowing a ruddy hooley anyway) was pushing us at speed towards shallow water buoys and a small island. I then dropped the bow mudweight whilst erindoors calmly donned her lifejacket. I then dropped the stern mudweight (having had the forsight to request a second from the boatyard) gaining a rope burn in the process.

I then rang the Richardsons fault line all the time watching our mudweights drag in the wind. I got Richardsons lengthy speech about privacy, data protection and recording, before being presented with 4 options, none of which involved faults!! When a pleasant female voice answered i explained our predicament, again watching us getting closer to the warning buoys. It took what seemed like 10 minutes to find an engineer to whom i repeated my tale with a tad more urgency. He said a tow boat was on the way. We were now against the buoys.

I opened the engine hatch an got a blast of hot air for my pains. There was also the sight of a disconnected air filter box(see pic). 

Around an hour after my call the engineers  arrived, by which time our stern was 20feet past the buoys. After much sharp intakes of breath, exchanges of technical information, and frenetic spannering, the diagnosis of a fritzed water pump impellor was announced. This was replaced and we were on our way again with the Richardsons guys following us all the way for reassurance. I have to say the guys were efficient, reassuring and clearly competent. We were very grateful to them  but Richardsons should really look at the means of reporting emergencies by phone.

The rest of the day passed peacefully and we did enjoy our meal. Thank you all for your good wishes.

Cheers

Chris

20190701_215852.jpg

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On reflection, you might have found it more efficient to drop the second mudweight up by the bow as well. This trend to carry a second mudweight (for the stern? ) tends to often present a larger profile to the wind, causing more drag. Previously I have only recommended it for fishermen just to keep the stern in the same spot, but apart from that, a second mudweight, at the stern, usually IMHO just makes matters worse, as your dragging might indicate.

The only time I have dragged, except at Ranworth, has been in a near gale!!

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Hi Marshman and thank you for that advice. I did request the second mudweight for fishing purposes and i did not think of chucking that off the front too. I was just glad i had two. 

Today was, thankfully, less eventful. I was stood in òur bow well around 5am, rod in hand and contemplating nature and all her wonders, when the kingfisher flashed past me again. Another early fisherman, thought I, the only differences being he was younger, faster, and a darn sight more attractive. A couple of hours later an otter surfaced in front of the boat (which explained why the bites had stopped) and he must have been close to 3 feet in length.

Anyroadup, after breakfast we travelled slowly to Pottet Higham with me watching the temp guage like it was the final number in the lottery jackpot. Steady around 70. We moored ip on the "quiet moorings" and visited the most eccentric store i have ever known, Lathams. Moderately laden we approached the bridge pilot and expressed our wish to venture through the bridge. This was met with another sharp intake of breath (is that a Norfolk thing?) And he advised not for a few days as the water levels are too high. Disappointed we returned to Swan Rapture to review our plans.

Another "sighting" came in the form of a rather large grass snake crossing the road on our walk to Martham.

Lots of fish caught. An excellent fish and chip supper (though i did forget we had no salt on board), then more fishing followed by a couple of games of Quiddler.

These moorings are aptly named as this is the most tranquil place this evening.

Tomorrow's destination has been left for tomorrow.

Cheers

Chris

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9 hours ago, grounded said:

Tomorrow's destination has been left for tomorrow

Isn’t that one of the best things about the Broads? Just see how you feel when you wake up and where the mood takes you. Have a great day! :default_icon_wave:

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Well we have had a quiet couple of days, i am happy to say! 

Wednesday started at 4.30am and the river at Potter Higham was magicaly misty and silent. The fish were biting and it was wonderful to stand and watch the community wake up and go about their business.

The plan was to give Upton Dyke a try, so off we set at a steady 4mph. Arriving at the dyke we saw the line of moored yachts along the right bank and the sign which shouted difficult to turn. So we bottled it and went to moor at the top of the dyke until we saw the sign "no mooring" so we got out of there and headed to Acle for a small loaf, all the while watching the boat behind us moor at the end of the dyke. Ah well.

Arriving at Acle we, of course, moored on the wrong bank which we realised carried a 10 quid mooring fee (redeemable against a meal at Pedros). As it was almost lunchtime and we did not fancy a small Mexican we went looking for the Bridge Stores. Having failed miserably in that intent we consulted our 2017 log and saw that Wednesday nights were carvery night at the Kings Arms. So we hightailed it, at 4mph, to Womack Staithe. To cut what could be a very long story short, we had a great meal and promised to return.

Thursday began at 4.20am and Womack Water sounded like the noisiest place on earth. It was as if every feathered creature was holding forth at full volume to greet the day. I guess the trees created a natural ampitheatre but it was the dawn chorus as i have seldom experienced it before.

We decided to head for Wroxham after breakfast. At 4mph. The pilot was as efficient as ever, and that was the fastest the boat had moved all week. We moored along Hoveton Viaduct and admired the recent upgrading of the moorings. Having thrown a wad of cash at Roys we had a fish and a rest before an excellent cod and chips supper at Greys. I then caught a few quality roach and perch, all the while marvelling at the huge perch which followed every catch to the surface.

Now i have a question for the learned folk on this forum. Whilst purchasing comestibles at Roys i selected a pre-pack of 4 Braeburn apples. Upon proceeding to munch one on the boat, i saw they were a product of New Zealand. It was an excellent example of the variety, but i paid less for it than i would at home. This apple had left a carbon footprint the size of Big Foot travelling 12000 miles and was still cheaper than in the country that produced it.

How the heck does that work?

Cheers

Chris

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54 minutes ago, grounded said:

Well we have had a quiet couple of days, i am happy to say! 

Wednesday started at 4.30am and the river at Potter Higham was magicaly misty and silent. The fish were biting and it was wonderful to stand and watch the community wake up and go about their business.

The plan was to give Upton Dyke a try, so off we set at a steady 4mph. Arriving at the dyke we saw the line of moored yachts along the right bank and the sign which shouted difficult to turn. So we bottled it and went to moor at the top of the dyke until we saw the sign "no mooring" so we got out of there and headed to Acle for a small loaf, all the while watching the boat behind us moor at the end of the dyke. Ah well.

Arriving at Acle we, of course, moored on the wrong bank which we realised carried a 10 quid mooring fee (redeemable against a meal at Pedros). As it was almost lunchtime and we did not fancy a small Mexican we went looking for the Bridge Stores. Having failed miserably in that intent we consulted our 2017 log and saw that Wednesday nights were carvery night at the Kings Arms. So we hightailed it, at 4mph, to Womack Staithe. To cut what could be a very long story short, we had a great meal and promised to return.

Thursday began at 4.20am and Womack Water sounded like the noisiest place on earth. It was as if every feathered creature was holding forth at full volume to greet the day. I guess the trees created a natural ampitheatre but it was the dawn chorus as i have seldom experienced it before.

We decided to head for Wroxham after breakfast. At 4mph. The pilot was as efficient as ever, and that was the fastest the boat had moved all week. We moored along Hoveton Viaduct and admired the recent upgrading of the moorings. Having thrown a wad of cash at Roys we had a fish and a rest before an excellent cod and chips supper at Greys. I then caught a few quality roach and perch, all the while marvelling at the huge perch which followed every catch to the surface.

Now i have a question for the learned folk on this forum. Whilst purchasing comestibles at Roys i selected a pre-pack of 4 Braeburn apples. Upon proceeding to munch one on the boat, i saw they were a product of New Zealand. It was an excellent example of the variety, but i paid less for it than i would at home. This apple had left a carbon footprint the size of Big Foot travelling 12000 miles and was still cheaper than in the country that produced it.

How the heck does that work?

Cheers

Chris

Hope you are going to tell them when you buy some apples when you get back home

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7 hours ago, grounded said:

Well we have had a quiet couple of days, i am happy to say! 

Wednesday started at 4.30am and the river at Potter Higham was magicaly misty and silent. The fish were biting and it was wonderful to stand and watch the community wake up and go about their business.

The plan was to give Upton Dyke a try, so off we set at a steady 4mph. Arriving at the dyke we saw the line of moored yachts along the right bank and the sign which shouted difficult to turn. So we bottled it and went to moor at the top of the dyke until we saw the sign "no mooring" so we got out of there and headed to Acle for a small loaf, all the while watching the boat behind us moor at the end of the dyke. Ah well.

Arriving at Acle we, of course, moored on the wrong bank which we realised carried a 10 quid mooring fee (redeemable against a meal at Pedros). As it was almost lunchtime and we did not fancy a small Mexican we went looking for the Bridge Stores. Having failed miserably in that intent we consulted our 2017 log and saw that Wednesday nights were carvery night at the Kings Arms. So we hightailed it, at 4mph, to Womack Staithe. To cut what could be a very long story short, we had a great meal and promised to return.

Thursday began at 4.20am and Womack Water sounded like the noisiest place on earth. It was as if every feathered creature was holding forth at full volume to greet the day. I guess the trees created a natural ampitheatre but it was the dawn chorus as i have seldom experienced it before.

We decided to head for Wroxham after breakfast. At 4mph. The pilot was as efficient as ever, and that was the fastest the boat had moved all week. We moored along Hoveton Viaduct and admired the recent upgrading of the moorings. Having thrown a wad of cash at Roys we had a fish and a rest before an excellent cod and chips supper at Greys. I then caught a few quality roach and perch, all the while marvelling at the huge perch which followed every catch to the surface.

Now i have a question for the learned folk on this forum. Whilst purchasing comestibles at Roys i selected a pre-pack of 4 Braeburn apples. Upon proceeding to munch one on the boat, i saw they were a product of New Zealand. It was an excellent example of the variety, but i paid less for it than i would at home. This apple had left a carbon footprint the size of Big Foot travelling 12000 miles and was still cheaper than in the country that produced it.

How the heck does that work?

Cheers

Chris

Likewise your excellent fresh lamb brought over at a temp where it does not freeze solid is usually cheaper than our Welsh, upland or Southdown lamb. Now that has a serious carbon footprint. My Son, his wife and her parents were over from Melbourne and Sydney a few weeks ago. I had intended to serve early British leg of lamb but there was non to be had due to the early producers pulling out of the market having "caught a cold" (pun intended) in 2018 because of "The Beast from the East" At the end of a superb dinner I had to put my hands up and confess that the said animal had travelled further to my dining table than they had!

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Sounds like an idyllic couple of days. Grey’s is always our preferred option for fish and chips on the Broads. :default_smile:

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39 minutes ago, SwanR said:

Sounds like an idyllic couple of days. Grey’s is always our preferred option for fish and chips on the Broads. :default_smile:

To be honest we will eat a sit down meal in either of the two fish shops and find them equally as good.

Regards 

Alan

 

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Enjoying your tale grounded, was that your first visit to Latham’s? Hope you enjoy the rest of your trip and no more mishaps. 

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What  entertaining  posts Chris/Grounded. P!ease keep them coming II'm thoroughly enjoying them. We're heading north from Brundal hopefully next Saturday (13th) as long as the tides are low enough(with a 12'6" air draught) we're somewhat vertically challenged  at Yarmouth!

Caro!e

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9 hours ago, vanessan said:

Enjoying your tale grounded, was that your first visit to Latham’s? Hope you enjoy the rest of your trip and no more mishaps. 

Hi. No we have been to Lathams many time in the past, the last being 2 years ago, but it never ceases to amaze me how they can have such a varied and eclectic mix of items all so mixed together. Long may it continue!

Cheers

Chris

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53 minutes ago, grounded said:

Hi. No we have been to Lathams many time in the past, the last being 2 years ago, but it never ceases to amaze me how they can have such a varied and eclectic mix of items all so mixed together. Long may it continue!

Cheers

Chris

How true! It’s a marmite sort of place - you either love it or hate it. There are bargains to be had amongst the tat, you just have to search them out. 

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Well, I guess it had to happen. Rain, and this style of "bathtub" does not have the overhang over the front well which i use to shelter from precipitation and now i am getting too wet! 

Yesterday we decided to take a slow mosey to Coltishall, another of our favourite places. There we were proceeding at 3mph towards a mooring we spotted by the common. I saw this craft coming towards me on the wrong side of the river. I wondered what the heck was doing before i realised almost too late that he was after the same mooring. He was really shifting, in a 3mph limit, and i had to quickly go into reverse. He got the mooring. Daftest thing was he had to pass a bigger one just to get to it, so we just slid into that one. I think he was just determined to get it because i wanted it. Anyway, the craft was "Swallow".

We took a walk through the village to Horstead, followed by some fishing, somewhat hampered by much floating weed, but in the clear water i spotted some very large perch and an impressive pike. We finished the day with an excellent meal at the Rising Sun and more fishing and Quiddler.

4.30am Saturday morning and i was again dangling my maggots. The scene was pretty quiet and peaceful until around 100 Canada Geese decided to stage a Pythonesque screaming contest in which even the judges joined in. What a racket!

After catching a few small fish i hooked and landed a beautiful bronze bream of about 4 to 5 pounds. A few more small fish followed and then the inevitable happened. One of the perch decided he wanted an easy breakfast and literally inhaled the 4oz perch i was bringing in. What a scrap! It was a good job my hook transferred to his top lip or he would have bitten through my line. There is a pic of him next to my size 43 foot.

The plan was then to head for Thurne Dyke and the Lion Inn, but the dye was full so we about-turned and we are now moored on Fleet Dyke watching the rain and wondering what to about our evening meal. Once this rain slows i will start fishing again. Just another great day on the Broads.

Cheers

Chris

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