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Never again will I trust the BBC.

I have just had to endure a recording of what was my favourite program.

The one where experts used to show you how to restore items with little titbits of tips on how to do things.

I loved it!!!

Now the main thing to get on it seems to be the ability to cry when ordered.

YES 

The Repair Shop is now The Tear Shop.

paul

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I set my TV box to automatically record lots of episodes of this program but I can't bring myself to start watching them.

I'll probably end up deleting them.

Used to be good, but then that's the BBC in general. I gave up on them for "entertainment" years ago.

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Yes it's getting too predictable now, but not so much that you can't play "Guess who's going to cry". I lost that one this week.

I was right with "Guess the technique" though: guessing, "She'll glue pigskin on the back of it" for the leather chair.

The window restoration was interesting though.

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Oh dear I quite enjoyed the programme.  I thought the guy who did the French polishing, brought the musical box up a treat.

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That's right! Behind all the tears and drama are some wonderul skills. I particularly like watching Steve, the horologist (is it). Also, the fella that revived the jukebox recently was a wizard!

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Jealous of the skills they have but why when the customer bring something broken in do they say “what would you like us to do to it?” “Could you put it in your skip please I haven’t got room in mine. I always hated that uncle anyway.” What do they think the people brought it in for? It’s because they can get it repaired for nothing instead of paying mega bucks.


Sent from my iPhone using Norfolk Broads Network

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Times are bad, but why start knocking the BBC and a good program? If you want bad viewing watch another broadcaster, there is plenty of real rubbish out there.

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16 minutes ago, Heron said:

but why start knocking the BBC

what about the jubilee WATER pageant, we saw more jubilee babies and anneka rices bum than boats, greg dyke said they had done a good job, never see another in our lifetime and we never really saw that one was a real shame.
wouldnt trust them to run a raffle

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I too like the program for the skills of the repairers but the presentation is the way most broadcasting companies are going these days, they  dictate the flow of the program to the way they think the audience wish it to be; sadly they are wrong with directors having too much american influence. The production is standard BBC, an hours program that could be condensed down to a little over 30 minutes.

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I have watched Repair shop from series 1 episode 1 on afternoon tv.

It has now become a mockery of those first programs if you didn't see the first series try and find them online and see the difference.

I will probably still record it and watch it with a trigger finger on the fast forward button of the remote, should only take 5 minutes to watch, avoiding the mushy stuff.

paul

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 I quite like this programme and if the owners want to cry then why not. You must have a heart of stone. This program is hardly a betrayal of trust.

Having just got back from a few weeks in Canada, I can tell you that there is absolutely nothing worth watching on the TV there at all, and you long for something of the quality of the BBC. Talking to the locals, they say that they rarely watch TV now and all broadcasting has now effectively ceased. Be careful what you wish for.

As I understand it, the items for repair on this programme are selected from submissions made by the public. I guess they choose interesting items like the very old clock they did recently (no tears there) or, if an item is not interesting, it needs a good story to go with it. Hence choosing the emotional stories. Maybe the balance has tipped a bit too far towards the stories rather then the objects but then maybe they have to take what they can get.

The skills needed to fix the mechanicals and the electronics in that juke box are something very special.

Now, I wonder if they will fix my teddy.....

Nigel (Ludham)

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A particular part of the presentation template we don't like (applies to RP and Antiques Roadshow) is the short but annoying resume at the start of each show. I don't what the purpose of this is but I try and hit the mute button for it's duration.

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Could I point all you restoration fanatics swiftly to YouTube where of late I have become fascinated by the restoration videos? Majority of them with no voice over at all, just a swift written sentence on screen detailing the product or tool they are using to clean or repair the subject of the video. I've discovered that I thoroughly enjoy watching old rusty metal items cleaned off in the sandblasting cabinet, shined on the buffing wheel or undercoated and painted in spray booths with powder coatings or paint.  I'm riveted to riveting and go nutty watching new metal fixtures and fittings duplicated on the lathe to replace old. Leather cured and cut, stitched, glued and generally leathered. Pattern welded steel forged to make beautiful Damascus steel blade using old bike chains, ball bearings and assorted junk. I've also been following historical dress makers, followed some of the retro clothing and makeup wearers, boat repair blogs and many, many videos on history and archaeology, perfume and fragrances.

All of it for free, all of it often tear free...some of my favourite woodworking, metal working and model making channel hosts have a habit of putting their fingers through the machinery. The majority of it filmed expertly, brilliantly edited and often with daily updates blogs, vlogs and websites to complement the series.

Many of the experts you find on TV shows like The Repair Shop have their own YouTube Channels. As do the likes of Clarkson, May and Hammond. If you've not found Drive Tribe on YouTube yet....Clarkson with no filter, Hammond talking to the guys restoring his car collection and James May opening and going through his fan mail, or Hammond and May building Lego Kits while downing vodka shots, is hilarious! One of the channels I've watched for years I only recently realised the woodworker is some big actor for his day job. I thought he just ran a woodwork shop.

OK I admit it, Ellie and I have our own YouTube Channels and we 'produce', advise and create content for several  more, so I can tell you that there is a hell of a lot of work that goes into some of these YouTube videos. The current situation has played havoc with the shooting schedule. Trips to London to film archaeology and perfumeries have been put on hold, a years worth of research on the history and archaeology of The Broads is bubbling on the back burner until we can get out and film it, and hours of impromptu script typing are underway ready to make new content next week...and I'm waiting until I'm well enough so Ellie can cut my hair ready for camera. I can contend with a face like a wizened walnut but it's the Doc Brown Back to the Future hair do that's doing my head in but as I am on lockdown in my house and Ellie in hers I'm content with talking over the garden gate.
 

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Tim, here i have to agree with you, i have for a week only had the tv tuned to youtube, Acorn to Arabella, Tally ho, Keith Ruckers vintage machinery channel, mustie1 if you want small engines and car restorations (mostly vw's) and as the presenters link up, you get a branching off to new channels.yes i too love model making and restoration youtube channels, so if anyone has any good ones please list them here

 

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Marina keeps talking about  contacting The Repair shop.Reason being she has a old pram giving to her Uncle from Germany. Its in need of there care.Also a steiff Teddy given to her by her Uncle. The bear too needs work done on it.

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Should read old pram given to her by her Uncle.

Think I need the repair shop on my posting skills!

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having been told how great the program is I watched a few episodes, but can't really say I have much time for it. It's wonderful to see some of the techniques used in the restorations but the program, like many of it's type is far too staged. It's a total cringe fest. The last one I saw included the usual menagerie of family heirlooms each with it's own tear jerking story of why it needs to be restored, what it means to the family, it's association with long dead relatives etc.

I'm afraid my first thought with these things is always along the lines of if it's so sentimentally valuable why have the careless dim whits allowed it to deteriorate so badly in the first place? Perhaps it's the old cynic in me but what I see is someone with a bit of old tat in the back of a cupboard and a shot at being on the telly box.

Like Timbo I much prefer watching some of the restorations on You Tube. Things like old bench vices, woodworking tools etc. No back story, no great value once completed, just restored because it's there and it can be. Some of the results are staggering. 

 

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1 hour ago, Paul said:

I'm afraid my first thought with these things is always along the lines of if it's so sentimentally valuable why have the careless dim whits allowed it to deteriorate so badly in the first place? Perhaps it's the old cynic in me but what I see is someone with a bit of old tat in the back of a cupboard and a shot at being on the telly box.

 

Agreed. I wonder if they have to make a contribution to the cost of the restoration? The dukebox when finished, matched one on the market for £14K. 

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I do admit to cringing at some of the American restorations where they take an old workaday tool and restore it to within an inch of its life, they will take a precision item and wire brush and grind it until it gleams, unfortunately all this work has removed any precision surfaces it may have had and rendered it a very pretty ornament, i prefer the type of restoration that brings the item back to its original precision and leaves it fully functional too.

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I must admit my time watching terrestrial TV is now limited to two hours a week at the moment. Country file (Although this is becoming a bit apolitical, in some of the farming reporting). Antiques Roadshow always watched it but even more so as one of my acquaintances is one of the experts on there.

I much prefer YT some of my favourites

Acorn to Arabella ( A must watch boat builders)

Auto Auction Rebuilds ( Auction site walkarounds and reviving wrecks)

Mustie1 ( Repairing and reviving Garden machinery, Motorbikes, Quads etc)

Big Clive ( Must watch electronics and oddball things channel with a great humour)

More car shows than I can fit on here

Curiosity INC ( Canadian antiques shop owner very into toys and collectables and repairs cars, currently restoring a Racoon infested Rolls Royce)

Franchise Kicks ( Buys and sells customer return items from Amazon etc)

And lots and lots of Ham radio shows too

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Now that the tv schedules have been turned upside down including there not being any sport, we do find that we are spending more time together in the evenings finding things that interest us both.

We do spend a lot of time watching YouTube, a number of narrow boat channels, Broads vlogs and outdoorsy bushcraft channels.

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1 hour ago, SwanR said:

Now that the tv schedules have been turned upside down including there not being any sport, we do find that we are spending more time together in the evenings finding things that interest us both.

We do spend a lot of time watching YouTube, a number of narrow boat channels, Broads vlogs and outdoorsy bushcraft channels.

Youtube - :5_smiley:

Narrowboats - :5_smiley:

Broads Vlogs - :5_smiley:

Bushcraft - :214_lion_face: Given the recent videos I saw of alligators/crocodiles and leopards moving into Indian villages during their lockdowns, I guess this would be useful if lions are found in Ranworth Marshes !

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I think I am a bit like Grendel on this one.

Here we have an opportunity to show how a collection of the finest restoration experts go about their work. I have always thought that the real experts are those who can just sit there and make it all look so easy.

Instead, only about 25% of it (if that) is now devoted to showing you how it was done, which is what I really want to see. 

The rest is just an obviously pre-arranged succession of gushing, and rather American "dripping sentiment" and I am afraid I am fed up with it.

Another example of how the TV "yuppies" always think they know what we want to see.

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