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Timbo

The Big Firkle 2020

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On 20/05/2020 at 10:33, grendel said:

 

I have a drawer in my workshop literally just above the workbench full of finger sized plasters for such eventualities, and being on thinners myself I appreciate it doesnt help.

I prefer this

highland-park-12-year-old-2-glass-gift-pack-p1640-5643_medium.jpg 

 

 

 

 

To this

553996350.jpg

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I fell foul of one of the classic blunders. The most famous of which is "never get involved in a land war in Asia," but only slightly less well-known is this: Never go in against a Sicilian when death is on the line. Although, I would include 'never trust in the common sense of the British public' and 'always include an alternative method of gaining access to any lockable box you build'!

The black self adhesive felt had arrived this morning. I proceeded to line the interior of the box lid with it. It looked superb! I went to remove the false bottom of the box. It was jammed solid. No matter what I did, I could not get it open! The lid was jammed and the magnets in the 'handle key' were just not strong enough to budge the lid. As a last desperate measure I was forced to drill two screws into the top of the lid as a means of yanking the false bottom out of the box. Even then it took some doing.

There seemed to be plenty of room all around the false floor. The finish hadn't become tacky and caused the floor to stick.Using the screws I tested the fit again. It seemed to slide into position easily, but again I struggled to remove the floor. This was starting to annoy me. It was hot inside the workshop. Sweat was pouring from me as I struggled with the box. I reached for my digital vernier. The length and width of the floor remained the same...or did it? I carefully checked all along the length and breadth of the floor. Each corner had increased in size by .2 of a millimetre according to the readout. Hmm! Must be the heat and moisture content of the shed. I hand sanded all of the edges again. Thinking about it, the box needs to be accessible to an eight year old so I gave the edges a good sanding on the belt sander.

I will leave the two screw holes in place just in case we can't access the box again, but I will cover the base of the box with felt to hide that they are there! But before all that I will keep testing the fit to make sure everything is working before I give the box to Gracie on Wednesday!

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Ah, you fell into the trap of making things too perfect a fit, i have done that several times on the model, dry fitted a part to not be able to get it back out, so much so that now when i do a final glue up of any part that butts to another i include a sheet of paper over the bearing surfaces, then while it may be a pig to get off once the glue has dried, afterwards when the paper is removed, the fit is good but not so good it binds.

Then I have also been guilty of fitting a removable part, then fitting another part to find I have now locked the movable part in place with the newly fitted part, usually with a razor saw and a bit of finessing, the part can be made removable once again.

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12 hours ago, grendel said:

Ah, you fell into the trap of making things too perfect a fit

I blame those Sicilians! :default_norty:

Everything has now been sanded back a bit. I had to be careful not to sand too much or the locking mechanism wouldn't line up. So the base fits in and out with just a slight jiggle. I lined the box with black felt. Gracie's choice, I asked her what colour she thought would go with an orange/yellow colour that would go more orange over time. She chose black and then started to tell me about a video she saw of men in a jungle building a house in two days and painting it orange and black. She's sharp!

While I was fitting the felt I realised that the use I had made of positioning the various magnets, locks and access points next to significant knots in the wood was pointless if I was going to cover them with black felt. So I drew knots in pencil on the underside of the false floor so that the scheme would still work.

So the lock box project is finished. I will be giving the box to Gracie on Wednesday. So I will see what she thinks of it then.
20200525_203511.jpg

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are you going to test Gracies perception and see if she spots the floor is false? ie the inside is smaller than the outside?

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I've temporarily stuck some tape over the locking pin channel to stop things locking until Gracie has had a chance to play with it. I'm going to put some 'pirate treasure' inside. These will be some nickel plated coins Uncle Albert had in his coin collection. The rest of the 'treasure' I'm hoping NBN members will help me distribute and hide around the Broads leaving little clues (easy enough for an eight year old to work out...I'm thinking about myself not Gracie) as to their location. Then when we can finally travel down to RT there will be a treasure map and hopefully the possibility of 'pirates' to track down and she can liberate their treasure!  :default_biggrin:

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Arlo's Train

I can't make something for one grandchild and not the other. That's not how the game is played. Some of you have met Gracie but not come across her little brother Arlo yet. 

Blonde curls and blue eyes Arlo is my little shadow. Whatever I'm doing, Arlo is doing. Ellie and her parents are often in hysterics watching Arlo copy my antics. He has the 'Cambridge Walk' off to a tee. As a landscape archaeologist, I spend a lot of time 'observing things'. I have a habit of strolling along with my hands clasped behind my back to stop my stroke arm swinging uselessly. Occasionally I will stop and have a look about and I'm told I stroke my chin if I find something interesting to look at. Arlo trots along beside me and mimics my walk, over exaggerating my limp, and stopping to stare at random objects stroking his chin.

Planes and trains are Arlo's 'thing'. Air-planes mostly but he is a 'bit of a lad' and Grandma would not appreciate a chunk of lumber crashing into her walls and windows. I might get away with a train ramming into the skirting. Grandma had suggested a 'pull-along' duck but I think he would appreciate something with a bit more to it. So, I'm making him a train and carriages to run along the floor. Maybe I can join in with the NBN toy train enthusiasts? :default_norty::default_gbxhmm:

Normally I design my projects on the fly, or start with a borrowed idea and develop it as I go along. Arlo's train was no exception. I started off by hunting for similar projects I could adapt. I'm not making a scale model here. I'm making something that looks like a steam train that rolls along the floor. There are lots of similar projects out there, but the trains all look too 'American'. The look I'm going for is a bit more British. I'm not a train spotter. I don't know one part of a steam train from another. I already knew the 'experts' would start pointing out details I've got wrong. I already knew this because Ben Gunn started comparing some kind of tank engine to another and something about some other kind of train and how I have to put this or that thing in certain places. I just wanted a British looking train design without the cowcatchers and weird shaped funnels that two year old can roll along the floor.

I decided it would be best if I designed my own toy train, particularly as the look I wanted involved the wheels being hidden behind a skirt. I'm still thunking the thing through but I have a rough pencil design. I'm now working my way through how I'm going to design the wheels and attach them behind the skirt. I think a hole saw will feature heavily in this project as I don't have a lathe.

Here are my pencil plans so far. The drawing is to scale with two squares to one centimetre.
20200526_084040.jpg20200526_084052.jpg
Time for more thunking on the dog walk!

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Timbo,

Why not make a pull along boat, with wheels hidden maybe a version of RT.

With that thought now festering go back to the train.

paul

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1 hour ago, Timbo said:

Arlo's Train

I can't make something for one grandchild and not the other. That's not how the game is played. Some of you have met Gracie but not come across her little brother Arlo yet. 

Blonde curls and blue eyes Arlo is my little shadow. Whatever I'm doing, Arlo is doing. Ellie and her parents are often in hysterics watching Arlo copy my antics. He has the 'Cambridge Walk' off to a tee. As a landscape archaeologist, I spend a lot of time 'observing things'. I have a habit of strolling along with my hands clasped behind my back to stop my stroke arm swinging uselessly. Occasionally I will stop and have a look about and I'm told I stroke my chin if I find something interesting to look at. Arlo trots along beside me and mimics my walk, over exaggerating my limp, and stopping to stare at random objects stroking his chin.

Planes and trains are Arlo's 'thing'. Air-planes mostly but he is a 'bit of a lad' and Grandma would not appreciate a chunk of lumber crashing into her walls and windows. I might get away with a train ramming into the skirting. Grandma had suggested a 'pull-along' duck but I think he would appreciate something with a bit more to it. So, I'm making him a train and carriages to run along the floor. Maybe I can join in with the NBN toy train enthusiasts? :default_norty::default_gbxhmm:

Normally I design my projects on the fly, or start with a borrowed idea and develop it as I go along. Arlo's train was no exception. I started off by hunting for similar projects I could adapt. I'm not making a scale model here. I'm making something that looks like a steam train that rolls along the floor. There are lots of similar projects out there, but the trains all look too 'American'. The look I'm going for is a bit more British. I'm not a train spotter. I don't know one part of a steam train from another. I already knew the 'experts' would start pointing out details I've got wrong. I already knew this because Ben Gunn started comparing some kind of tank engine to another and something about some other kind of train and how I have to put this or that thing in certain places. I just wanted a British looking train design without the cowcatchers and weird shaped funnels that two year old can roll along the floor.

I decided it would be best if I designed my own toy train, particularly as the look I wanted involved the wheels being hidden behind a skirt. I'm still thunking the thing through but I have a rough pencil design. I'm now working my way through how I'm going to design the wheels and attach them behind the skirt. I think a hole saw will feature heavily in this project as I don't have a lathe.

Here are my pencil plans so far. The drawing is to scale with two squares to one centimetre.
20200526_084040.jpg20200526_084052.jpg
Time for more thunking on the dog walk!

He will need a box to put it in!

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Thunking done, and I decided the best thing to do was to firkle my way through and build a prototype with the materials I had to hand.

The main problem that I'm having is that I'm now in Grendel territory. All the parts I'm making are so damned small that I keep dropping them, can't get a grip on them or can't see them, I'm still waiting for new glasses!

When I first started woodworking, I was making all of the various jigs the YouTube woodworkers produce by the thousand. I slowly stopped doing this and got rid of them all bar two as I was making more jigs than I was projects and quite frankly they were not that useful! Having said all that, I think I'm going to have to make something I kept putting off. I think I need to make a drill press table and fence.

Three six and a half millimetre holes in a straight line to fit the axles is defeating me. I've had three goes at it and despite marking everything as exact as I can, punching the positions to give the brad point on the drill bit a start and carefully positioning the workpiece under the drill bit, I still can't get those damned holes in a straight line!

I've spent more time today watching videos on how to make a drill press table and fence than I have doing woodwork! BUT...I just don't get it? From what I understand, I make a wooden table that fits around the metal drill press table on the drill, then bolt it to it. Now, by randomly fixing a straight piece of wood as a fence in one corner I'm supposed to be able to position this so that I can slide my workpiece along it and the holes I drill will be the exact same distance from the edge? I suppose I'm just going to have to try it tomorrow.

I have made some progress today. Again I think a drill press table will make one particular operation safer for me to do one handed. I've started with the wheels first. Without a lathe I used a hole saw to cut out each wheel. But first I used a forstner bit to make depression in the centre of the wheel. It looked more 'train-like'. Cutting the blanks out with the hole saw was tricky. I don't have the strength in my left hand to hold the workpiece down while I operate the drill press with my right hand. The metal table of the drill press does not offer much in the way of room to use a clamp safely either. So again it's back to the idea of a drill press table.

 

So far all well and good, but I think my choice in material was a mistake. I've got quite a few odds and ends of black walnut loafing around and I thought it would be a suitable material and colour for wheels. What I'd forgotten was, what a pig walnut is to clean up and sand. Hand sanding the outer edges of the wheels was not working too well. So I threaded the wheels onto a six millimetre bolt with a washer either side and then a nut.
20200526_185854.jpg
I then chucked this assembly into my corded electric drill, donned a leather work glove and spun the wheel assembly into some sandpaper. It worked. Sort of. Walnut really is tough stuff and I was going to be at this for hours. So leaving the assembly chucked in the drill I turned on the bench sander and spun everything in the drill while holding the wheels to the sander belt. This really did work.
20200526_185901.jpg
Now for the internal part made with the forstner bit. I tried a small sanding disc on the multi tool on my scroll saw and finally a round, flat grinding stone. Again this kind of worked, but I was not going to get the finish I would want on these components. I'm going to change the material over to maple. This cleaned up much better from the word go, even straight off the drill press a maple wheel I made was much cleaner.

A20200526_193703.jpgfter day one, I have six rough wheels and a rough chassis. I need to do better tomorrow!

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Tim, clamp a piece of wood to your drill press table, then slide your workpiece against that, or even just pack out from the pillar to the correct distance and then slide the workpiece along. you can even just throw a couple of bolts through the table and use the heads as the fence.

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On 22/05/2020 at 15:44, Timbo said:

20200520_122844.jpg

see where that block of wood is on your drill, get a longer piece and clamp it, when you place your part to be drilled straight, just make sure the drill is centred over the hole in the table, and use a scrap piece of ply under the work to stop splintering out as the drill bit goes through.

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