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37 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

They had "babies heads" as well !

 

I always knew them as 'dead babies', only I don't remember what they were? Dumplings perhaps?

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4 minutes ago, JennyMorgan said:

I always knew them as 'dead babies', only I don't remember what they were? Dumplings perhaps?

Steak and Kiddley pudd'ns .

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Don't know where the submarine bit comes from but the classic definition of "ship" or "boat " was once told to me that you can carry a boat on a ship but you can never carry a ship on a boat. Works for every situation. 

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Not too bothered about many etiquettes but the one that does gripe is the flying of the red duster from the pointy end or from atop the main mast yardarms (notice all that nautical stuff there ). Should be at the stern only so as to not show disrespect.

Incidentally , while out on the rivers the last few days I have noticed of the few boats I have seen that some owners are not flying the Ensign as much as before. Is this perhaps that as there are no hire boats about at present they feel no need to differentiate ? Curious

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1 hour ago, Poppy said:

Steak and Kiddley pudd'ns .

they were always snake and pygmy in our works canteen, then there was lookers pie (we were on the edge of Romney Marsh)

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1 hour ago, RealWindmill said:

Don't know where the submarine bit comes from but the classic definition of "ship" or "boat " was once told to me that you can carry a boat on a ship but you can never carry a ship on a boat. Works for every situation. 

That's the one, and because you can't carry a boat on a submarine, it's a boat. And if anyone wants to argue with that, I'll back down immediately. :default_coat:

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4 hours ago, floydraser said:

That's the one, and because you can't carry a boat on a submarine, it's a boat. And if anyone wants to argue with that, I'll back down immediately. :default_coat:

So this HM Destroyer is in fact a boat then? The ship that it's on being a semi submersible.

Type-42-Destroyer-on-MV-Swan.jpg

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That's correct.

When onboard the Dockwise deck the Destroyer is a boat as she is being carried and Dockwise is a ship. When Destroyer is afloat she is a ship as she is carrying Jolly boats or lifeboats. Lifeboats and Jolly boats can only ever be boats as they are always carried (unless they are in turn afloat and carrying model boats - so then can technically be ships).

So in every circumstance a vessel can either be a ship or a boat, but never both at the same time.

:default_blink:

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As a (only too occasional) hirer, I intrude here with a little trepidation, but I hope my question is valid to the topic. In 2019 we hired Swan Rapture (loved the craft). At the boatyard I requested an additional mudweight, being something my father had always done, in case we mudweighted on a broad and needed to keep the boat in one position for fishing. Anyroadup, our motor overheated on Barton Broad and the wind was blowing like 10,000 b*****ds. I deployed (dropped) a mudweight off each of the bow and stern. We still dragged an awful long way before the Richardson's repair crew arrived. We were advised that, should we suffer a similar fate in the future, we should drop both mudweights off the same end of the boat.

What does the team think?

From almost Covid-free NZ

Chris

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One word for lots of reasons ‘Agree’ but mainly wind resistance, getting least resistance to the wind so less chance of blowing the boat along and dragging ground tackle.  Both mud weights over t sharp end with the weight evenly between both mud weights

Griff 

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For anyone thinking of getting one of these: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Emergency-Boat-Ladder-134-cm-5-Steps-Yacht-Foldable-Safety-Boarding-EMLAD5/273010791893?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

I will be sending it back. It's cheaply made. It's shown mounted through the storage bag so you pull the strap and it deploys, but the eyelet holes in the bag are too small so the ladder ropes won't go through. The 5 steps are only 3ft top to bottom and as Marshy observed, they would need to be below the surface leaving you well short of being able to get on board anyway.

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Can I suggest that you also post a review relating to its "functionality"! Looking at the original listing, although there are only three reviews they do suggest its a suitable safety aid which your observations clearly show it isnt!

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18 hours ago, VetChugger said:

Can I suggest that you also post a review relating to its "functionality"! Looking at the original listing, although there are only three reviews they do suggest its a suitable safety aid which your observations clearly show it isnt!

That's a very good point. I must admit I don't take much notice of the reviews on Ebay but I have only been invited to do a review after the completion of a purchase. I just hit the review button and it did take me to the form but I'll hold back until I've had the refund just in case. I also notice the wording, "Most relevant reviews" which suggests they may be selected. 

I think the boat was "asset stripped" of these lovely steps and other things before I bought her. It would be nice to get hold of another set.

 

bowling steps 2.jpg

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22 minutes ago, floydraser said:

That's a very good point. I must admit I don't take much notice of the reviews on Ebay but I have only been invited to do a review after the completion of a purchase. I just hit the review button and it did take me to the form but I'll hold back until I've had the refund just in case. I also notice the wording, "Most relevant reviews" which suggests they may be selected. 

I think the boat was "asset stripped" of these lovely steps and other things before I bought her. It would be nice to get hold of another set.

 

bowling steps 2.jpg

They do turn up at boat jumbles but are fairly sought after.

If you fancy making your own, Davey &Co offer all the relevant fittings and hinges but make sure you are sitting down when you get to the price list. Excellent quality stuff though

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By all means use a mudweight to keep the boat still whilst fishing, but always move it to the bow with the other one,before turning in to kip.

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28 minutes ago, JanetAnne said:

They do turn up at boat jumbles but are fairly sought after.

If you fancy making your own, Davey &Co offer all the relevant fittings and hinges but make sure you are sitting down when you get to the price list. Excellent quality stuff though

The stainless steel straps look expensive on their own.. Would you know if these steps are a standard design?

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Thought they might have been as much use as a wet blanket!!!! Usually see them on sailing boats but even there, next to useless.

You can get longer ones but even if you weight the bottom step they are still not easy either to get on, or climb up!! As you get higher it will press against the hull and you then cannot get your foot in - that just adds to the problem.Some of the metal ones have little legs to keep it away from the hull but they tend to be just 3/4 steps  totally useless for your boat!

I am struggling to see a proper and usable option - how about a 10 foot aluminium ladder you can stick over into the mu?/ At least that might work!!

However as was said earlier, probably the best thing is to swim for the bank and/or search for an exit point! People fail to appreciate once you are in, there is seldom the need for a franctic hurry other than aiming to get out safely without spending a long long time in the water. As long as the jacket inflates you are never far from a standing up point and then that enables you to assess the situation safely without losing your head - even with a fancy ladder there is no way I could climb up these days so THINK about options and don't panic!

 

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17 minutes ago, marshman said:

 

However as was said earlier, probably the best thing is to swim for the bank and/or search for an exit point! People fail to appreciate once you are in, there is seldom the need for a franctic hurry other than aiming to get out safely without spending a long long time in the water. As long as the jacket inflates you are never far from a standing up point and then that enables you to assess the situation safely without losing your head - even with a fancy ladder there is no way I could climb up these days so THINK about options and don't panic!

 

Yep, I think I'm guilty of over thinking it, and not for the first time! Thanks.:91_thumbsup:

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2 hours ago, floydraser said:

The stainless steel straps look expensive on their own.. Would you know if these steps are a standard design?

Not quite standard because the size as well as the actual angle of the treads can differ according to the hull they are laying against but yes there are many interpretations of a very similar design hence the hinge availability.

They are also mostly hand made as well. 

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Just remembered... Timage do the hinges at a decent price but their boarding ladder hooks and brackets are nowhere near the design of Davey version. They are not a bad price however.

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9 hours ago, marshman said:

I am struggling to see a proper and usable option - how about a 10 foot aluminium ladder you can stick over into the mu?/ At least that might work!!

That is nowhere near as quirky as it sounds and they are often carried on canal barges.

If you tie the top of the ladder to the cabin top handrail and let it lean out over the side, then someone in the water can simply walk up the ladder and step off onto the deck!

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