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2 hours ago, Vaughan said:

That is nowhere near as quirky as it sounds and they are often carried on canal barges.

Along with old bikes, pot plants, bent TV aerials and other detritus. :default_hiding:

I think I'll stick to the usual safety equipment, practise the drill and brief the crew.  :91_thumbsup:

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7 minutes ago, floydraser said:

Along with old bikes, pot plants, bent TV aerials and other detritus.

Marshman and I were actually offering sound advice based on experience but as you wish . . . .

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1 hour ago, Vaughan said:

Marshman and I were actually offering sound advice based on experience but as you wish . . . .

Sorry Vaughan, there was something of a smiley there but it's just my humour. I appreciate your input.

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4 hours ago, Vaughan said:

That is nowhere near as quirky as it sounds and they are often carried on canal barges.

If you tie the top of the ladder to the cabin top handrail and let it lean out over the side, then someone in the water can simply walk up the ladder and step off onto the deck!

Hello Vaughan,

Maybe carrying ladders is a thing on the French Canals, I have spent maybe 40 odd years on the UK canals and I have never seen ladders maybe the the odd pair of steps and a plethora of other items on the roofs of many live aboard boats. The tidy one tend to have roof lockers to keep all there good in.

Regards

Alan

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Ladders are no good for single handing, no point bobbing around in the water looking longingly at the ladder on the roof.

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7 minutes ago, Smoggy said:

Ladders are no good for single handing,

Excuse me, I didn't know we were discussing "single handed" where any safety equipment would have to be rigged for use before you "buggered in" in the first place. 

There is a hire company in France which equips its boats with aluminium ladders with a non slip plate surface on one side.  So they can be used as a ladder, or a gangplank.  Very useful!

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If I had forty or more feet of box section canal boat roof to clutter up, and no desire to pass under Potter, then carrying a ladder, and perhaps a wheelbarrow for the shopping, makes a perfect sense. Collapsible ladders are available, at a price; but the ease by which someone can exit the water by ladder, as suggested by Vaughan, seems eminently workable. Ladders are also useful as gangplanks, crossing mud like on Breydon and also for bridging voids on some steel shuttered moorings when it comes to rigging your fend-offs. Vaughan's idea doesn't deserve being scoffed at, indeed were I a 'stink boat' owner then I would give it some serious consideration. Sat here, in my junior 'keyboard warrior' outfit, I can see the sense in a timber ladder because it floats, and one that is perhaps half the width of a conventional ladder so that it takes up less room. Being timber it can be floated along to a casualty who can then lie on the ladder so that those on board can then lift the ladder into a vertical position so that the unfortunate victim can then gracefully exit the wet stuff. However, the advantage of an aluminium ladder would be that the bottom end would sink and be easier to climb onto. Surely an idea worth playing with. 

I have seen Dutch  Drascombes with ladders cut out of plywood, how simple is that! Indeed so simple I'm going to make one! Thanks for reminding me,  I'd completely for gotten about the idea! It is the obvious way forward. The simplest ladder being onen having one central column with alternate steps, left and right. The thing, being slightly flexible can can lay alongside the gunwale for storage. The joy of retirement, another project!  I'll see if I can find an article on the Drascombe Association Website.

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All well and good Pete, but if you need 5 steps to get into a Drascombe, you would need at least 15 to get onto Denham Owl!!!!!!!

Back to an aluminium ladder OR swim to the bank and stand up!!!

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59 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

Excuse me, I didn't know we were discussing "single handed"

I didn't think crew numbers had been specified (poor memory, beer since, cba reading back), no scoffing was intended just pointing out.

Now the central column ladder idea with smaller diameter steps on one side could slide in to make stowage even easier and kinder to your deck, probably need a locking mechanism of some kind to keep the sliding steps out, would need beer and mind altering drugs to design though.(or just someone with a better imagination)

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Dutch Drascombes? Are they left hand drive?  Sorry, my humour again.

My first thought about a ladder would be the clutter factor but I recently found a YT video where a yacht owner had adapted an aluminium ladder to be a very adaptable boarding ladder/gangplank thingy. 

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3 minutes ago, Smoggy said:

Now the central column ladder idea with smaller diameter steps on one side could slide in to make stowage even easier and kinder to your deck, probably need a locking mechanism of some kind to keep the sliding steps out, would need beer and mind altering drugs to design though.(or just someone with a better imagination)

How about a pole with folding motorcycle type foot pegs? 

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The aluminium ladder works brilliantly but yes storing it on board can be an issue. 

When I have all the grandkids aboard along with canoes, paddleboards etc grabbing a wild mooring and burying a ladder in the mud from the transom works superbly and saves grandads back from all that hauling bodys aboard.

12ft of aluminium along the cabin roof soon loses its appeal though so it goes home with the canoes.

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1 hour ago, floydraser said:

My first thought about a ladder would be the clutter factor but I recently found a YT video where a yacht owner had adapted an aluminium ladder to be a very adaptable boarding ladder/gangplank thingy. 

Any link to this possible? (Or some idea of where you found it would be good.)

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27 minutes ago, vanessan said:

Any link to this possible? (Or some idea of where you found it would be good.)

I had to trawl through another load of yachting videos showing bikini clad females before I found it but I consider it a public service. I'll expect an OBE one day...

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Those fold up steps on the transom are all well and good but I defy any of you persons over a certain age ( probably 20 ) to get your foot up onto the bottom one when you are in the water, and then haul yourself up, plus wet clothes, out of the water! My guess probably only PW who works out regularly from his shed in the bottom of his estate. They just don't get over the problem of getting out of the water to actually get on the steps!!!!!

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What about a wooden folding loft ladder, stained and varnished to match the topsides. It could be mounted to the boat and easily adapted for length.

I have a rigid, fold flat 6' hooked ladder that can be hung over the side and reaches 4 feet into the water, cost me £10 second hand about 10 years ago. Never been used in anger.

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Serious point, could you self rescue? Could your crew take the helm and safely return to where you fell in? 

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1 hour ago, psychicsurveyor said:

What about a wooden folding loft ladder, stained and varnished to match the topsides. It could be mounted to the boat and easily adapted for length.

I have a rigid, fold flat 6' hooked ladder that can be hung over the side and reaches 4 feet into the water, cost me £10 second hand about 10 years ago. Never been used in anger.

Actually, that thought occurred to me also. Firstly though, I had a thought as to how I may be able to track down the original steps and I have started the hunt.

I have realised how the steps attached to the boat so I would need to buy the corresponding fittings and set them the correct distance apart to fit.

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That's a surprise, I can't seem to find a photo of the MOB ladder I made for onboard 'B.A', the photo's below were taken during the making process, can't seem to find one of the finished article.

I made these hardwood rungs, the bottom one has a lead insert underneath it.  Thick white rope with a knot and s/steel washer under each ruing.  Above the top rung the rope is is just looped over a cleat and then chucked overboard, it can be deployed in seconds and lives in a deck locker so is easy to get to.  It has been used in anger and works very well

Griff

 

BA NBN 145.JPG

BA NBN 796.JPG

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