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simonwootton

Mudweighting (northern Broads)

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Hi All, some pointers please from the experts! I always get a little nervous about not being able to find a mooring during the busy season, even though evenings are longer and the weather is generally kinder. I've mudweighted in a couple of broads previously but wondered if you could suggest good safe places to mudweight should the need arise? Thanks in advance, it's an OCD thing .....!

Simon

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I always use the Lime Kiln Dyke end of Barton Broad. Plenty of room to get out of the channel, either side out of the wind.

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You're not alone Simon, I'm a little concerned about my first and last nights as I'm picking up from Brundall this year and I'm pretty worried due to the sparsity of moorings on the Southern Broads.

I particularly like dropping the weight on South Walsham inner broad (AKA The Weirs). There are also a couple of decent size moorings on Fleet Dyke which leads onto the broads. Salhouse is always a favourite too.  There's also a little room down the end of Womack, although I've seen it get very busy with people waiting for space on the staithe. More room on Malthouse (Ranworth) but again it gets busy with people waiting to moor up.

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Most of the time you can get a mooring along St Benets Straight without mudweighting.. and walk from there to the Dog Inn Ludham.

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57 minutes ago, MaceSwinger said:

You're not alone Simon, I'm a little concerned about my first and last nights as I'm picking up from Brundall this year and I'm pretty worried due to the sparsity of moorings on the Southern Broads.

 

 

Chris - we have hired from Brundall (Brooms)for the past 4 years or so...  on our last night we always head for Rockland short dyke (if heading back to Brundall from the south that is the first turning to Rockland Broad) - lovely remote moorings - decent walks etc and only 20 mins back to Brundall in the morning - there is of course the option of heading further down into the staithe - just add 10 mins.  Sure there are other options depending on pubs etc - but works for us and never had any issues getting onto the moorings.

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3 minutes ago, Markw said:

Chris - we have hired from Brundall (Brooms)for the past 4 years or so...  on our last night we always head for Rockland short dyke (if heading back to Brundall from the south that is the first turning to Rockland Broad) - lovely remote moorings - decent walks etc and only 20 mins back to Brundall in the morning - there is of course the option of heading further down into the staithe - just add 10 mins.  Sure there are other options depending on pubs etc - but works for us and never had any issues getting onto the moorings.

We've never got in at Rockland before, but then in the past I've only ever been in there with 42 footers! Short dyke had been another fall back, but I was hoping to get a couple of hours cruising in first. Until I actually know what time we're out the yard it's all moot really I suppose :default_laugh:  Anyway, I don't want to drag this off topic and away from the advice Simon needed!

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1 hour ago, simonwootton said:

Hi All, some pointers please from the experts! I always get a little nervous about not being able to find a mooring during the busy season, even though evenings are longer and the weather is generally kinder. I've mudweighted in a couple of broads previously but wondered if you could suggest good safe places to mudweight should the need arise? Thanks in advance, it's an OCD thing .....!

Simon

Simon - is it north or south or both that you want info on?

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4 hours ago, MaceSwinger said:

 . . . .. . . . . I particularly like dropping the weight on South Walsham inner broad (AKA The Weirs). . . . . . . . 

Pretty certain that although you are permitted to cruise South Walsham Inner Broad, you’re not allowed to mudweight on it.  No doubt someone will be on to correct me if that is not the case, though.

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5 minutes ago, Mouldy said:

Pretty certain that although you are permitted to cruise South Walsham Inner Broad, you’re not allowed to mudweight on it.  No doubt someone will be on to correct me if that is not the case, though.

Sorry, you are of course absolutely right, I got my inner and outer mixed up :facepalm:

SWB.PNG

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Remember to have some cash with you in case needed for overnight mooring anywhere that is charged. I know it’s not mudweighting but Ranworth Island is often a good backup plan with the option to mudweight if it is full. And the same would go for Salhouse Spit. Have a great time. As you said, at least you have longer daylight hours this time of year. Oh, and don’t forget that if you’re hiring then you can usually moor in other boatyards overnight. If there are plenty of boats out then logic would say that a space in one of the yards would probably be possible. 

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Salhouse spit is indeed a good choice if you don't fancy mudweighting. It's one of those places there's always loads of space because people tend to moor on the broad instead. Wroxham Broad is lovely to mudweight on but can feel exposed if it's windy. There's always Hoveton Little Broad which is a calm oasis next to a very busy stretch of river.

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Thats an interesting map of S Walsham Broad! I was always led to understand that it was the bit between the Broads which was known as The Weirs, not the whole of the Outer Broad. In fact it is the only place, Google Maps, that does call it The Weirs and personally, I think that info is probably wrong!

Anyone know how it got its name? I knew an old boy in the village who used to swim in an area immediately to the north but inland a bit of the Inner Broad, which he said was known as The Pits. He said when he was a lad it attracted a large following swimming there, primarily because some of the girls used to take off all their clothes!!! Either that or he more likely imagined it!!

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I had a boat last time out with an electric winch, it was only when I was winding out that I thought how do I know when it hits the bottom practice I guess . ;)

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Thats an interesting map of S Walsham Broad! I was always led to understand that it was the bit between the Broads which was known as The Weirs, not the whole of the Outer Broad. In fact it is the only place, Google Maps, that does call it The Weirs and personally, I think that info is probably wrong!


I'm inclined to agree. My dad, in his 60s and has been boating in Norfolk all his life, had never heard it called that either, and neither had I. Regardless of name, one of my favourite spots anywhere in the world.

Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

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1 hour ago, marshman said:

Thats an interesting map of S Walsham Broad! I was always led to understand that it was the bit between the Broads which was known as The Weirs, not the whole of the Outer Broad. In fact it is the only place, Google Maps, that does call it The Weirs and personally, I think that info is probably wrong!

Anyone know how it got its name? I knew an old boy in the village who used to swim in an area immediately to the north but inland a bit of the Inner Broad, which he said was known as The Pits. He said when he was a lad it attracted a large following swimming there, primarily because some of the girls used to take off all their clothes!!! Either that or he more likely imagined it!!

I arrived at this issue from a totally different direction due to researching something else,  MM, I can point you at OS Explorer (OL40) map which clearly labels the narrow neck as "The Weirs" as does other references, canalplan.org for instance is one.

I have also found a reference to a place in New Hampshire, good ol' US of A, where in the 1800's they were constructing "Fish Weirs" in the narrow parts of rivers, or whatever. I'm no fisherman but as I understand it the weirs were used to control fish, both those they wanted, and those they didn't.

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I can see none of you have checked your Hamiltons - suggested in there which I have no reason to doubt, that it has a shingly bottom following an attempt to block it off many years ago.

As I mentioned in my earlier post just to the north of the Broad where the channel enters the Inner Broad are some big holes in the ground known as The Pits, according to my old boy, and the land rises quite sharply there - well around 15' or so ( it is Norfolk! ) I shall have a nosey one day as it occurs to me that is where the shingle could have come from - would explain a lot!!

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On 29/06/2020 at 13:46, simonwootton said:

Hi All, some pointers please from the experts! I always get a little nervous about not being able to find a mooring during the busy season, even though evenings are longer and the weather is generally kinder. I've mudweighted in a couple of broads previously but wondered if you could suggest good safe places to mudweight should the need arise? Thanks in advance, it's an OCD thing .....!

Simon

Simon - my apologies for asking whether it was north or south you wanted when the clue is in the topic title! :facepalm:

I know a few people use mudweights fore and aft, to hold the boat steady, and moor close to a bank but not touching it. You obviously need to make sure there is sufficient depth for this and it probably wouldn’t be sensible in a strong/gusty wind. I am assuming you are hiring so you could ask the boatyard to provide you with a second mudweight. I’m sure if this is a naff suggestion, someone will very quickly say so. 

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I've overnighted happily at both ends of Barton depending on wind direction, Salhouse at the Wroxham end, Womack and Malthouse on a single weight. The theory is the boat swings into the wind so give minimum resistance.

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2 hours ago, stumpy said:

The theory is the boat swings into the wind so give minimum resistance.

An interesting side effect of that was noticeable on South Walsham outer a couple of years ago. Myself, my dad and brother in law were all fishing. I was smashing them out for about 10 minutes and then it dropped off and all of a sudden my brother in law's rod went mad! The boat had turned and, although I 'm not certain of what was happening beneath the surface, he'd managed to hook into what ever group of fish I was into just before :default_laugh:

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On 29/06/2020 at 20:21, Broads01 said:

Salhouse spit is indeed a good choice if you don't fancy mudweighting. It's one of those places there's always loads of space because people tend to moor on the broad instead. Wroxham Broad is lovely to mudweight on but can feel exposed if it's windy. There's always Hoveton Little Broad which is a calm oasis next to a very busy stretch of river.

As with all broads, mud weight at the windward end under the shelter of trees to reduce the chance of Dragging...

If you're going to mud weight on Wroxham broad, then please keep out of the way of the racing marks, and generally out of the middle of the broad.

If racing has resumed and your in the middle or by a buoy, you'll get a very annoyed rescue boat coming for a visit to tell you to move..

Oh mud weighting in the navigational channel, even if next to the bank is Technically illegal.. (Broads reg 64) which just about means any river.

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6 minutes ago, TheQ said:

mud weighting in the navigational channel, even if next to the bank is Technically illegal.. (Broads reg 64)

Thanks for that info. I have often seen people do it, particularly anglers. I assume it refers to dinghies too? It’s certainly not unusual to find a dinghy with anglers on board mudweighted mid-stream. 

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6 minutes ago, vanessan said:

Thanks for that info. I have often seen people do it, particularly anglers. I assume it refers to dinghies too? It’s certainly not unusual to find a dinghy with anglers on board mudweighted mid-stream. 

if it floats.. yes.

We often find fishermen mudweighting in the river at Horning, I gently warn them If I'm in the club rescue boat that they are going to be buzzed by lots of sailing boats and that what they are doing is illegal..

Once or twice all I've had is abuse back, 20 minutes later with a couple of dozen sailing boats going past a few inches away they decide to leave...

With the fishing regulations Buried in the Navigational Regs, I doubt many fishermen have read them (let alone motors and sailers)

I believe it would be better if they were separately published and available as a pamphlet for fishermen..

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