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Woman fell into River Bure at Yarmouth yacht station


jillR

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL

She was attempting to BOARD the boat, so she would have been very unlikely to be wearing a lifejacket. I bet even you would`nt be wearing one if you`re going ashore for a walk into the town Dave?. What i found just as worrying was the caption under the photo stating that several boats were set adrift by passing youngsters, resulting in one hitting Haven bridge. That could have been even more disasterous than just ONE person slipping while trying to board a moored boat. I think the time has come for these little sods to be thrown in after the boats they`ve set adrift?.

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She was attempting to BOARD the boat, so she would have been very unlikely to be wearing a lifejacket. I bet even you would`nt be wearing one if you`re going ashore for a walk into the town Dave?. What i found just as worrying was the caption under the photo stating that several boats were set adrift by passing youngsters, resulting in one hitting Haven bridge. That could have been even more disasterous than just ONE person slipping while trying to board a moored boat. I think the time has come for these little sods to be thrown in after the boats they`ve set adrift?.

Don't make bets you have no chance of winning Neil, I take mine to the pub with me if it's anything other than a simple safe floating pontoon to board from as that is the time you are most likely to go over the side. :grin:

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL

Don't make bets you have no chance of winning Neil, I take mine to the pub with me if it's anything other than a simple safe floating pontoon to board from as that is the time you are most likely to go over the side. :grin:

Well, in that case, DON`T DRINK SO MUCH :lol::lol::lol: . Is a simple safe floating pontoon any safer than a solid concrete and iron quay heading/, i doubt it. What is a fact is that it`s always down to an individuals appraisal of the situation, and on that score, we`ll ALL have differing beliefs about what`s a safe situation and what is`nt. As i said above Dave, i bet you`ve been seen somewhere near the water WITHOUT your lifejacket on at sometime. The woman in question was as i said above, trying to board the boat, so it`s more than possible she was returning from a walk into town, and it`s NOT unreasonable for people to leave their bulky and awkward "bouyancy" aids on the boat. One last point, the report said the inshore lifeboat crew pulled her unconcious from the river, so with the fast flowing tide, and even stronger undercurrents, the fact they were able to pull her from the surface, and not have to dive under water makes me tend to believe she was more likely to be wearing a bouyancy aide already. Now that IS worthy of consideration before appointing blame?.

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Not at all Niel, you ask a question which should need no answer but I will give one anyway, of course a good safe Walcon floating pontoon (not a rickety fetid dyke type) is always easier and safer than a quayhead as the boat can be moored more tightly as there is no rise and fall between the boat and pontoon. Converesly a boat needs to be sprung and be looser on a quayhead especially like YH due to the rise and fall, this could mean anything from having to climb down a way to climbing up a way, the pontoon is a predictable and a constant.

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The Yacht Station at Yarmouth presents an extraordinary combination of hazards, far greater than elsewhere on the Broads.

As has been said, the 5 feet rise and fall, and the average tide speed of around 4mph make mooring alongside without pontoons very hazardous for experienced boaters, let alone the often less experienced hirers.

So many of them are anxious to fit a visit to Yarmouth Town into their itinerary, often ending with a return to their boat after dark.

The impracticality of taking your lifejacket with you around the town (especially the ugly big orange foam ones) means that most people don't bother, even if the thought does occur to them.

The thought of families returning to their boats in the dark at Pub closing time, climbing down slippery ladders onto boats bobbing around in the swirling tide is frightening. Even cold sober, one slip and they are carried away at 5mph in pitch darkness, with hardly anywhere available to fish them back out. Anyone is lucky to survive that, even if their colleagues are on the ball and can think very quickly.

I would think that proper floating pontoons with sloping, railed gangways down to them should be mandatory there, especially for chargeable facilities provided officially by the BA. As Antares said, they also provide a much safer means of mooring as well, without needing any allowance for rise and fall.

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It was going to happen sooner or later.

Last week I walked into Yarmouth with my sons along the river and yacht station. Being the easter school hols, there were of course loads of families around and the moorings were full. I saw about 50% of the kids wearing life jackets.

One young lad, of about 11 or so, was on the outside of the boat on the river side, trying to slide a canopy shut on a single level Alpha (the ones with the split sliding canopy). He was heaving with all his might, and therefore inherently off balance. He had no life jacket on, and his mum was inside the boat trying to help with the canopy! The tide was in full ebb on a spring, so flowing very fast. I remarked to my eldest that one simple slip, and the lad would be drowned, and maybe did this a little loudly, but only received incredulous looks from the boy and his mum.

Some people cannot see grave danger, even when it is infront of their eyes I'm afraid.

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Even the proffesional rescuers can make mistakes, there was a case in the news last week where a lady needed urgent medical treatment for a condition whilst aboard a cruise ship in the north sea, it was decided to transfere her to a Norwiegen rescue boat, but whilst doing so the crew managed to drop her stretcher due to the swell of the tides causing the vessels concerned to move apart, dumping her into the north sea which was -3C at the time, she did have a life jacket on for the transfere, and they managed to get her out, only for her to die later in hospital, it must have been a terifying experiance for the poor woman indeed.

Julz :wave

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL

I still think people are missing the point i made above?. The fact the woman was pulled from the water unconcious, meant she WAS on the surface, and that with all the strong tides, and especially the MUCH stronger undercurrents which would have pulled an unconsious body under, it seems more like that she WAS in fact wearing a lifejacket or bouyancy aid. Obviously this has not been reported, so we don`t know, but it seems to me more likely she was.

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL

Another point i forgot to add, 5 years ago when Karen came on her 1st trip to the Broads, we stopped at Oulton Broad yacht station in some very windy weather, which caused quite a chop on the broad. We were moored at the quay heading, but watching the outer pontoons, i was surprised to see them bobbing up and down quite a lot, with the boats dancing about at a differing rate, which made it very difficult for people walking to their boats, so it`s my opinion that floating pontoons are NOT as safe as some people believe. At least with a solid quay head, you have something stable, whereas with a floating pontoon, the stability can be seriously impaired due to weather conditions and other contributing factors etc. In inclemment weather, give me a solid quay anytime.

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Bill your comment regarding 'fixed quay heading' is clearly valid where there is little rise or fall. If the tidal range is reasonable then what was step aboard height at HW will be around 1.7- 1.9 metres lower aT GY based on LWMS tides; plenty of scope for an accident (although in no way am I saying this accident was caused this way as we don't know).

Good quality Walcon type floating pontoons with concrete floats are eminently stable as opposed to those with polystyrene floats. I would still take polystyrene floating pontoons at water level than having risk a 1.7 metre rise and fall though.

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can i just add to this

if it was low water at the time the women might of been trying to hop on the roof with the walkway being to low to get to & if there was moister on the roof or not wearing the proper footwear could have caused her to slip ..... this is one of the reasons why i dont want to moor at GYYS at anytime... i always thought there should be more ladders at this place to help boaters of & on there boat...

Jonny

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Guest DAYTONA-BILL
Bill your comment regarding 'fixed quay heading' is clearly valid where there is little rise or fall. If the tidal range is reasonable then what was step aboard height at HW will be around 1.7- 1.9 metres lower aT GY based on LWMS tides; plenty of scope for an accident (although in no way am I saying this accident was caused this way as we don't know).

Good quality Walcon type floating pontoons with concrete floats are eminently stable as opposed to those with polystyrene floats. I would still take polystyrene floating pontoons at water level than having risk a 1.7 metre rise and fall though.

Hi Dave, i DO aggree that GY is a special case, i`ve often thought that floating pontoons would be a good idea at such a location, but i don`t think they are the safest option in general. I DO take your point about the step on/off height being a constant, but i`ve been on MANY floating pontoons where in bad weather, they have proved to be VERY difficult to walk on, especially for the unwary, or inexperienced. However, if as you say a high quality pontoon is available, then i aggree it would be a safer option, but one problem with GY is river width. To be safe, i would imagine they would need to be at least 6ft wide, plus the posts for them to rise and fall on, would require at least 8-10ft out of the navigable channel, which in that location is simply impossible.

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