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3mph limit at BA moorings?


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A good idea or just a pipe dream?

Having just returned from 21 days on the Broads (2 on the north, 19 on the south :wave ), the amount of wash that we experienced on BA moorings from both private and hire boats, large and small, was at times, quite hair raising :norty: . The worst one was at Hardly Mill when a Haines 400 went past on the far bank and almost deposited us on the floating pontoon. Yes, the Haines from BBM, begins with "E" and ends in "A". :norty:

Take Herringfleet for example, which has a 6mph speed limit past the moorings. Whilst moored there at 11.00am at almost low tide, we were joined by a BA launch doing spot checks on speed with their radar gun. Of the 20 or so vessels that came past in an hour, most were bang on the limit whilst others were clocked at up to 8mph. No one was under the limit! One thing they all had in common was the huge wash. As the BA chap said, "wash is subjective but speed isn't - you're either speeding or you're not".

I know we should all "slow" down when passing moored craft, so why not have a 3mph speed limit past all BA moorings, say 200m before the mooring up to 200m past the mooring? The BA chap thought this was a great idea as i) it would reduce wash considerably to moored craft and ii) they could set their radar guns up on the moorings and no doubt catch more speeding craft acting inconsiderately. A win win situation for us moored boaters and the BA :clap . This could also be extended to other moorings on the Broads such as outside pubs, built up areas (Brundall?) and the like.

Then I woke up :yawn: and realised this was all a dream - or maybe not ?

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the Haines from BBM, begins with "E" and ends in "A".

I think that is 1 of 1 so not difficult to work out whose it is!

I agree in principle with your idea but it is wash more than speed that causes the issue. Try doing 3mph with an ebbing tide passed BA Moorings at Berney or those at Burgh Castle and to a lesser extend Reedham, it is not possible and maintain steerage but you will harldy make a ripple. Therefore it would mean BA Ranger using discretion; most that patrol the most tidal areas do seem to understand this but I can think of one in particular who clearly does not :norty:

There are already bylaws in place re wash

http://www.broads-authority.gov.uk/broa ... ws1992.pdf

Wash 12 No person while navigating any light sports vessel in

accordance with Byelaw 6 or any coaching vessel in

accordance with Byelaw 7 shall cause the vessel to make

a sustained wave, against a bank, of more than 300mm

(12 inches) in height from trough to crest

But this is as you say relatively subjective i.e. when does a 10" wave become 13"?

Your idea would work but I would suggest the BA would have to exempt certain BA moorings in tidal locations.

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I think this issue is dealt with very well by our septic cousins, "no wake" zones that mean just that, as you enter them you check your wake and slow down, woe betide anybody who misses or ignores one of these signs as I found out to my cost :oops: good job Sheriff J W Pepper didn't see the transgression but the "peer pressure" from those that did left me in no doubt. Whilst passing moorings it would mean (assuming it was realistically enforced) a more comfortable stay at riverside moorings.

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I agree with pks1702 re the tidal area's and would include Yarmouth Yacht station we have all had to go at 6 or 7 mph to stop being pushed back down the river.

I do however agree that all boats should slow down for moored craft including the commercial craft as well, some of these trip boats seem to rush past moorings in the evenings.

Going back to our early canal days this was always done but can be a pain these days on the canals because of the length of the moorings, not uncommon the have private, long term BWB and visitor moorings going on for miles rather than yards in some locations and on both sides of the canal.

Regards

Alan

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I think this issue is dealt with very well by our septic cousins, "no wake" zones that mean just that, as you enter them you check your wake and slow down, woe betide anybody who misses or ignores one of these signs as I found out to my cost :oops: good job Sheriff J W Pepper didn't see the transgression but the "peer pressure" from those that did left me in no doubt

:norty::lol::lol:

Signs all over the place

IMG4039-XL.jpg

Sheriff JW Pepper :naughty:

IMG3680-XL.jpg

For those that don't know said Sheriff ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cP1ICm10Kk

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For the reasons already mentioned, a 3mph limit passed moorings would be unworkable, but I do fully agree (and do put into practise) with slowing down when passing moored craft.

With the fast ebb current past Reedham Marina where we berth, there are always craft (both private and hire) travelling too fast past the moorings and creating a large wash. However, if your doing 6mph through the water, you are only travelling at about 3 over the ground already.

One thing that does definatley help is giving moored craft a wide berth if possible, to reduce the impact of your wash.

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For the reasons already mentioned, a 3mph limit passed moorings would be unworkable, but I do fully agree (and do put into practise) with slowing down when passing moored craft.

With the fast ebb current past Reedham Marina where we berth, there are always craft (both private and hire) travelling too fast past the moorings and creating a large wash. However, if your doing 6mph through the water, you are only travelling at about 3 over the ground already.

One thing that does definatley help is giving moored craft a wide berth if possible, to reduce the impact of your wash.

you made the same post last year how you put it into practise then a few weeks later you you came through Reedham with out any thought for the few boats that was moored there. Graeme

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first of all you'll have to educate the idiots that there nasa (or equivelent) speed log is in knots and not mph . perhaps changing signs to speed in knots would help ? seems o one can judge walking speed anymore . lol ..

i have the same problem every day with my boat , one thing i've notice is when a large number of gin palaces goes past to oulton broad to fast the combination of waves makes it worse (many of wich have 2011 tax stickers). unfortunatly the ba only warn about speeding to keep harmony , my solution is am looking at new moorings for next year.

did anyone else see the three boats travelling to norwich 11.30 +- pm , 2 were pushing into each other .. no nav lights or anything .. the mind boggles at the inteligence of some ppl. but who do you call, ba have gone home and police say its not there problem ... maybe the broads are classed as international waters? lol

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Logs, whether cheapo NASA or expensive Raymarine are switchable between kts. MPH and KPH in seconds Garry so that's not really an excuse (possibly a reason though) However it's academic as the speed limits are SOG not STW so the point is somewhat irrelevant. We always tried to use wash as an indicator of our impact rather than speed but that could mean exceeding the limit and at other times being well under it when punching the tide or with it up ones chuff through YH yacht station for instance, unfortunately that method is subjective and difficult to enforce other than by personal restraint and a respect for those around you, two qualities that are sadly lacking in quite a few people it seems.

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While we do always consider moored boats and usually travel below tha speed limit in terms of speed through the water, which is the producer of wash, as opposed to speed over ground which is stupid as you should see the wash off our boat if we travel at a legal 4mph through Reedham against a 3 mph tide.

The problem is often due to network rail.

What would you do if you are on approach to a bridge that you need open to pass, you radio in and are told that the bridge will close in 5 minutes and will not open again for at least 90 minutes and may not open at all as it is a warm day.

You are 8 minutes away and although you have left an extra 1/2 hour in your journey to Breydon bridge, which may only open once or twice a day, if you do not get through Reedham you will have to scrap your weekend.

Sometimes limits do get pushed.

It will be the bridges that force us off the Broads and I think that will be more and more the case for boats that do not fit under Reedham and Sommerleyton.

I'm sure the bathtub owners will be over the moon until they reason their tolls have doubled and all the pubs have closed.

Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk 2

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... one thing i've notice is when a large number of gin palaces goes past to oulton broad to fast the combination of waves makes it worse (many of wich have 2011 tax stickers). unfortunatly the ba only warn about speeding to keep harmony

Hi Gary

Gin palaces...?? tar brush etc?? - You may be surprised to learn that most of us are not Hooray Henry's, but just ordinary people who work hard. In my experience of cruising with various groups most of us DO try and consider other river users - and that includes Anglers and Sailies!

It is also my experience that even some of the small day boats make MORE wash than the "GIN PALACES" when they push tide.

I dont see the relevance of the "tax sticker" to this particular debate.

There is of course no excuse for idoicy, from whatever group of river users - and I am all sure we can all cite examples, but like it or not we do all have to rub along together.

I guess you are a "tax" payer in which case you will have recieved a copy of the broads newsletter which indicates that the BA DO indeed fine people for speeding. http://www.broads-authority.gov.uk/broa ... b_2012.pdf

I sympatise with the OP and consider his suggestion to be reasonable but for the reasons stated in replys agree that it would unworkable in fast tides where steerage needs to be maintained.

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Intersting comments so far and I fully appreciate the issues raised around the BA moorings at Reedham and GY - might as well include Burgh Castle, Berney Arms and Polkey's Mill as they all have strong ebbs.

From the latest centre spread of Broadcaster which shows 60 BA 24hr moorings, take out these five moorings with strong ebbs and that leaves 55 other moorings where a 3mph zone could be adopted. I still feel it could work at most moorings, especially those that are within a 6mph zone.

Guess I'm still dreaming :yawn: .

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The current speed limits seem to make no sense in some places.

Take for example that you pass Wroxham Broad going towards Wroxham and the speed limits drops after the second entrance/exit from the broad.

If the BA thinks that there is an issue in this area why not include the speed limit change before the broad and if the BA thinks that there is not an issue in the area why not leave the speed limit change until boats get to the start of the houses.

Speed limits also seem to go up and down fo little or no reason, yet where they should alter for moorings they do not, this is the case leaving Brundall towards Norwich.

It seems a nonsense to put a 24 hour mooring in a 6mph and not reduce the speed limit before and after the mooring area.

Regards

Alan

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Most 24 hour moorings on the southern side are in 5mph zones. It reflects the wider, faster flowing rivers in the south. The limits would be fine if they were through the water but once a speed limit is set people will tend to drive up to it and 5mph agaiinst the tide will often be 4 or 5 knots ( through the water) more than with it.

Sent from my HTC Sensation Z710e using Tapatalk 2

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I know this is going to sound stupid BUT

Would it be possible to have a "Wash height restriction"

Now, before you all wee yourselves laughing, we know that all boats are different but that each boat has it's own constants.

For this example we will say that boat "A" puts up a four inch wash at 1200 revs, a 6" wash at 1400 revs and an 8" wash at 1600 revs.

These "wash sizes" would be marked off on ther rev counter or on a plaque next to it.

BA ranger is already skillfull at telling a big wash from a small one, and after all, it's only the wash that matters.

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Are you sure about that Wayne?

I know there is for ski boats but I thought it was just written that vessels should not cause excessive wash and should slow down so as not to cause distress to moored boats if you were in a cruising boat.

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Seem to remember a test someone tried with that involving a Turbo 36 and an Irchwoo :grin:

Think the measurement is 12" but it relates to ski boats that are given dispensation to speed in restricted areas as long as they are pulling a skier. Water Skiing at 4 knots is not that much fun. :Stinky

I still say that all boats should travel as fast as possible so that the moorings are left peaceful for a longer time.

We did have a little incident while leaving Tide Mill the other day, A saily backed out of his berth in front of us even though we were making our way down the marina. I stopped but he had left a rope on and had to return to his berth. As he was back in his berth I continued so he waited till I was directly behind him and decided to back out again. There he was looking at me as he continued to back up showing no signs of stopping and signs of a stuck throttle that he could not turn off, I had no option but to open the throttles to avoid a collision.

Have to say I was quite surprised by the ensuing carnage that happened behind me. The sailys direction was reversed by the wash from Clanny and he bounced off a few things, pontoon, boat etc. But the big surprise was the effect just a very short blast of throttle had on half the marina. All I can say is you are better off with a Broom on the Broads than a Sealine in a marina. :naughty:

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