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LondonRascal

South & North with Brinks Royale

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Day Five:

 

 

Day Five Captain's Blog

 

It does not matter how I put this, today was not the most interesting of days on the Broads because it was what some might say is the 'long drag' when you leave the southern rivers behind and head north, knowing that there will be a long and winding mud and reed lined passage up the Bure towards Acle ahead.

I did not need to be up too early today because having moored overnight at Reedham I was well positioned to catch the last of the outgoing tide to help me towards Breydon.  What surprised me was the amount of boats who had left or were leaving and whom I knew were heading back north and who would enjoy a rapid transit to hand over Breydon before hitting a brick wall of tide heading against them as they turned at the yellow post onto the Bure.

I waited but there was an air of impatience wanting to get going and knowing one has a long way to cover - I departed calculating that I would hit the tide ebbing still out of the Bure but it would not be too great and I would have good clearance under the bridges.   I left Reedham and took my thinking about all the places I had so far been and done and how I still had some days left to explore the north - what would I do and where would I go I thought, at first the idea was the Ant but I thought I would prefer to if possible stop at Horning but as ever with me, nothing is set in stone.

It was getting warmer but certainly nothing like as hot as some of the previous days but it was none the less dry and bright with hazy high cloud .  As far as the Captain's Blog goes it is days like this where I know there will not be a great deal of interest to capture, just a day of cruising from point a to point b which makes my enthusiasm waiver a little in so far as capturing what many a viewer may consider to be mundane footage.  I was thinking how nice it would be if one day on my travels there was a bit of a strong wind blowing making crossing Breydon Water that much more interesting and exciting.  Alas, it seemed today was going to be another flat pretty windless crossing.

Further along the river and approaching Berney Arms  I realised that the breeze had turned into a constant and increasingly strong 'wind'.  It was coming right on the bow and so perhaps things were going to be a bit more interesting after all.  As you see before you what first appears a mass of posts in the distance marking the start of Breydon Water already the wavelets were getting a little better and there was a nice rocking motion on the boat -  but it was not until I was free from the protection afforded by the banks of the river that the wind really got up and I had a big smile on my face.

It was absolutely nothing to write home about - so I am writing about it here instead, but there was actual 'chop' on Breydon - nothing more alas,  but boat really came alive the hull shape cutting through the waves and as she rolled left or right you could imagine a far greater swell would be no issue for the high sides of the boat and her Class B certification - it was a moment like this the maximum rated 250hp as per the plaque on the helm would have been lovely.

I had a little too much enjoyment with the waves and as a result had crossed Breydon Water a little faster than I had wanted arriving around 25-30 minutes earlier and so having that little bit more of tide to fight against that I otherwise might have.  Still, once past the Yacht Station and out into the wider stretches things improved and continued to with many more boats heading down river to go south than were going north.  There is not much to say between here and Acle, I passed the time trying to do a little sketch to camera about an old man and his wife having hired boats for years and her wanting to get 'plastic' and he stick to the traditional wooden - I could not keep the accent up but probably for the best so not to embarrass myself.

And so I passed the Bridge Inn at Acle, the moorings all taken and thoughts turned to where I would be mooring after all.  I decided not the Ant, but to carry on for Horning after all.  There is a real feeling of being 'back north' when you reach the mouth of the River Thurne, it was interesting to see one of the little Brinks Sonata's moored stern on at the moorings near the mouth of the Thurne, having given up trying to moor side on (they have no side deck at all) clearly thinking the stern on approach was best - but at little over 23ft long it is a in boat terms akin to parking a Smart Car  nose into the curb and nothing sticking out into the road.

Following the Bure round soon St. Benet's moorings came along, then the mouth of the Ant.  There had been some rain but nothing too much - in fact all up the Bure I had skipped the horrible rain laden clouds and stayed pretty much dry.  While I was not filming a great deal I could have some 'time off' and just listen to music and enjoy the trip, Ranworth Damn came an went and then further on still ever closer to Horning and the time getting on too I wondered how likely it might be to find a mooring.   By the time I had passed Cockshoot (pretty full) I knew it was only a short way to go before the Ferry Inn would come into view, and I was pleased to see the moorings on the river front outside Ferry Marina were free.  So much of them were I could afford to carry on through Horning and have a nose about.  The Ferry Inn was busy but not full, but the public staithe was all taken - the New Inn busy but with some space so despite leaving it later in the day there was availability elsewhere.

I turned and came back the way I had come at the Swan and by the time I had got back to the Ferry Inn I could not immediately moor so had to pull over, let a boat past then wait for another coming the opposite way - much of this because I always prefer to turn to my right when I stern moor, it is just a comfort thing however in order to perform this manoeuvre I would have to back up a bit - but not too far - for there was a small dinghy a little way behind me the make a turn towards the mooring.

I had not taken account of the wind pushing me towards an overhanging tree, so as I went to turn my stern caught it - well actually the back of the canopy there was the rustle of foliage then a snap - no not the boat, but a small part of the branch seemed to have suffered and some leaves were now on the seating.  Ahh well, not that anybody saw - apart from the chap in the dinghy who happened to know who I was and captured the far more embarrassing moment after I had moored of be cleaning the windows and 'polishing the deck'  - still I was moored, had free electric hook up and so it was time to head into the Horning - only that did not happen, for I instead popped into the Ferry Inn and had an absolutely enormous meal at a very keen price - and personally found the food to be perfectly reasonable, not top grub but nothing wrong with it either and I especially like the 'chip shop' style chips.

So a long day of cruising was over, but now I was back north things could be easier, less worry about rise and fall of tide and scope to see a lot more over the coming days.

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Day Six:

 

Day Six Captain's Blog

 

Today began with a plan of being a short day as far as cruising, and doing rather little - however it evolved into a very full day with an awful lot including a visit to  the White Horse in Neatishead but it all started off around 6:00am in Horning.

After yesterday's long cruise back north from Reedham, I had spent a nice evening in the Ferry Inn with some good priced, nice food and drink and I had come back to the boat and feeling worn out had an early night.  I woke up in the morning and despite being only around 5:15am I could not sleep more and was restless, a cup of coffee later and I was all set wanting to do something - so I got ready and thought I would leave at 6:00am and go to Wroxham, shower have breakfast pop into Roy's and then have a nice slow day and more up somewhere around mid afternoon and call it a day.  How plans change.

It was lovely going past the chalet's all quiet without fishermen outside and needing to stay clear of their lines, the lack of activity on the water as if the wildlife was getting into their positions ready for the busy day of convincing humans they need more bread.  I saw a couple of boats on the move - sadly one speeding along clearly not thinking anyone else might be around a corner  as if they felt it ok to speed before others might be up and about.

I arrived in Wroxham and found a mooring in Barnes Brinkctaft's yard, handy as I could top up with water after my shower.  By now there was a distinct breeze in the air, cooler today more grey as well it felt like there was change happening.  I stayed in the yard for a while really just in no rush to do anything but after going into Roy's and coming back to the boat I thought about what I could do -  and decided upon the River Ant since I had so far not visited this beautiful river this trip.  Upon leaving Wroxham the breeze had got stronger and by the time I was past Salhouse things were getting challenging trying to stay on a straight course.

Royale is high sided but with a planning hull there is no keel and the ever more gusty wind would just push the boat left or right suddenly, it needed a lot of concentration and at times work at the wheel to counter the acts of the wind.  This wind as it turned out would get stronger still and be very much part of the day's events.

Through Horning I came, now all active with sailing boats down the river making the most of the windy conditions to get some good speed, but once into more pen country past Ranworth Dam with Reeds bending -almost bowing to the wind things were getting ever more lively at the helm.  I could actually feel the bow suddenly being pushed  this way or that, I had also zipped some of the canopy down but this meant it acted at the rear as a bit of a sail countering the wind on the bow meaning combined the boat would seem to slide sideways briefly - sometimes I wondered If I should either remove the canopy or put it all up - but I left it as was, because although less warm it was not cold and with all the sides done up the cockpit was a darker place.

I turned on to the Ant, despite being narrow and calmer than the Bure, on certain bends the wind would whip up and I would be fighting to stay out of the Reeds.  I knew right away Ludham Bridge would be fun - a windy exposed place at the best of times but on a day like today not a place to get caught in a line of boats trying to go through the bridge. 

When I arrived at Ludham Bridge it was indeed very strong cross winds, but they were confused gusting one way then a pause then something would gust from the other direction so you would not just be fighting a single direction of wind.  I lined up and was making a good run at it, all of a sudden I remembered my camera was still on the roof recording I looked at it, the bridge, the camera trying to work out if it would fit under - knowing it was too late to do anything about it now - right as I came under the bridge I slowed (as if that would have made much odds) since we were already under it the camera top about an inch from the concrete underside of the bridge.  Phew!  I was not stationary though pointing to the left under the bridge, yeah I like to make a mess of things at times - correct, power steer and off we went only for the bow to emerge the other side and be pushed as if by an invisible hand to the left - correct, power avoid the left bank and boat - this was getting to be annoying but far from the wind seeming to get less, it was getting worse with powerful stronger gusts.

At the moorings at How Hill - just where things narrow and can be tricky I was now in a slow convey of boats heading up river and all seemed to be having a better time of controlling their boats than me - oh, how I wanted a displacement hull now I thought.  Through the bottle neck I got not kissing a bank or boat Irstead would be the next 'pinch point' to worry about should boats be moored at the staithe and another coming down river - it had not dawned on me what this wind might be doing to Barton Broad whose large expanse of water can be whipped up on a day like today.  Indeed it was only when approaching it I noticed the white horses and spray coming off other boats bows as they began 'the crossing'.  A huge grin filled my face and soon I was on the choppy waters of the broad.

I headed to the right of the island and within moments of getting on the open water the wind was not gusting now, it was just full on constant - one small wave hit the bow at an angle and came over the top of the boat covering the camera (a non- water proof camera) but I was pleased I had hit record a couple of minutes earlier to capture the swell.  I kept to the right hugging the line of green navigation posts - boats coming towards me going with the wind had it far calmer than me going into the wind - perhaps they could have given me a little more room as I had the posts right on my starboard side but I tried to maintain a straight course, not hit a post not be blown to the left.  Honestly, I loved it and so a plan was hatched.

I'd head to Barton Turf (well Paddy's Lane moorings) and fix a waterproof camera on the bow before leaving back for the Broad and getting some footage of the water crashing over the camera on the bow.  It took a while longer to fix than I anticipated, and I had a false start leaving  the mooring then remembering I had not turned the camera on, having to moor again get down low at the bank and lean over to the boat and turn it on - goodness knows what people thought I was up to. Back on Barton by now the wind had eased a touch, the waves less aggressive but still the footage captured form two cameras proved to be unique if nothing more.

Back to Paddy's Lane, time to take off the camera (it was still there thankfully) but by now it was only afternoon, not much past 2:00pm if memory serves, and while a lovely mooring, quiet and sheltered I had an electric card left - I therefore decided to head to Sutton Staithe where I could use it up, and pop into the hotel for a drink later and have water in the mooring too.  I left the moorings at Paddy's Lane and took another blustery trip on the river up to Sutton Broad, which looked rather bleak in the now very grey conditions.  Upon arrival at the Staithe, it was - pretty much full.  I could have fitted in at a couple of places, once would have not afforded me having an electric post, the other would but I would have been right up to the stern on the other boat who was moored near the electric post, so it was a case of spinning around and heading back to Paddy's Lane - and I am pleased I did.

Upon arriving back at Paddy's Lane, I moored a little further down them away from Barton Turf - all was quiet, I signed off another day of the Captain's Blog  and tied things away on the boat before going for a walk along the moorings.  While the wind was still gusting it was dry and it was relatively mild so I thought I would walk up to the Staithe via the path, which begins as a pretty board walk through the trees - but before long the Blog camera which is always with me on my belt was once again called for, recording and an 'after hours' Blog sort of developed.  I got talking to a local man, the type of local who knows not only what is going on around him but as far as Horning as far as Landlords and pubs changes and the details.  He inspired me, I should really try the White Horse at Neatishead since its recent re-opening following a major refurbishment.   I checked with my friend Google who told me that it was about a mile and half away and so, I decided to take the Blog along with me for a walk in the countryside to the pub.

It is a very nice walk, lovely countryside, huge expensive houses in parts and a far quieter road than when I was walking towards Rockland St. Mary earlier in the week.  Trust me, if this city 'kid' can do this walk you can too and while practical and more sensible to moor at Neatishead and walk the short distance to the pub, it goes to show you can do it from Barton Turf too without hassle.  Upon arrival the White Horse has been transformed inside - they were gearing up for a big event moving tables and the like so I had the place to myself, it is modern but warm, welcoming and the selection of drinks and general feel to the place tells me this will become a pub people want to come to rather than one to go to because it is the only place for miles.

The Wherry was excellent, I really enjoy this and because the only time I get to drink it is when on the Broads it just reminds me of them, of previous adventures and memories - it would be nice to have it in my local in London but I know it would ruin the association of the Ale with my visits to the Broads.   Time to get going, so back on the road once more - a bit of rain in the air I felt, but fortunately just a spot or two.  By the time I got back to the boat the moorings had filed up a boat from Martham and a lovely wooden yacht to my stern.  I was hungry so it was time to get the dinner going - but why not since this was blogging after the 'official end of the day' film that too I wondered?

With camera attached to the window over the galley it was time to make a return of 'Cooking With The Rascal' - never a gourmet affair but none the less not junk food either - you can watch the end of the video that accompanies this to see what I had, and how you can make it yourself including how microwave rice can be cooked without a microwave!   And so after an early start in Horning, a challenging day with the wind cruising the rivers and the fun of the swell on Barton Broad, to a walk in the countryside to a village pub - one could not have hoped for a more varied day and I felt truly content - tomorrow I thought, will be a short, lazy day.

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Easy to make Robin's dinner using two pans and one ring - heat water in pan until boiling, add packet of rice, cover with lid, set aside. Using a large saucepan, brown mince, add sauce and simmer +- 10 minutes, then drain veg add to pan and simmer until hot.  Open rice stir into saucepan, check seasoning and serve.

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COOKING ON A BOAT....NOT A PROBLEM

 

Just had two meals......

 

first one

Steak, new spuds, salad followed by strawberries and cream

 

Second one

Home mad steak and kidney pie (from Roys) new pots, carrots, peas, and we used up some mince in the gravy....

 

That is cooking on a boat.....

 

OH and don't forget the bacon, sausage and egg sarnies for breaky

 

:Stinky

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Second one

Home mad steak and kidney pie (from Roys)

 

That'll be meat from cows with BSE, then?

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Well Robin, elf n safety cooking it was not  :norty:  :naughty: opening tin lids with your fingers, next time use the back of a spoon or a knife to lift the lid, just in case you end up with a sair cut finger or twa. :naughty:  Remember yer on yer tod sloan.

Once again in trying weather you did admirably. An excellent blog in a different way. Great to see the inside of the White Horse Inn at Neatishead. With that walk there and back, I am sure you woolfed down your gourmet concoction!

Looking forward to the next instalment.

 

cheers Iain.

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Iain you made me laugh - you think that was 'dangerous' you need to have a look at here: http://youtu.be/KqV4stK6Jzg?list=UUsQ0yVtKouBnYgj-03LMhHQ where I use a mixture of screwdriver bare hands and a folk to get a can open!

The next video is short - then the review which I will tackle in one hit editing wise, sorry been busy with a new 'interest' cycling and tonight I plan on taking my camera to film a little because that is something I might branch out into between Blogging the broads.

Many many a cyclist in London make videos - usually to complain about the near misses they have had, but as far as I can see nobody has been doing one about what you can see off the beaten track and the history of places you can ride to - oh and I do it all on a hired Barclays Bike (Borris Bike) just to make things a bit different.

 Anyway that is not for this forum but explains why video editing has not proceeded as quickly as usual.

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Robin, good, love to hear of folks laughing lol. YES I saw that episode too of the screwdriver. It was SWMBO cringed at the fingers on the lid, guess who opens the tins in our house!

 

cheers Iain.

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Day Seven:

 

 

Day Seven Captain's Blog

 

The last full day (for me at least) is the wind down day, because you have to be close to the boatyard for the morning return - or like me moor in it - it is not a day where you might want to do as much as previously and so it was for me.

I left the moorings a Paddy's Lane after 10:00am and though very much less windy than the day before it was certainly not calm.  I headed off to Neatishead just to go back up their via Lyme Kiln Dyke  which is beautiful, in fact I would go as far to say  that in summer when you have all the foliage on the trees and the birds are in song it is the most pretty stretch of water on the Broads.  It just feels like the most back water of backwaters so quiet and special.

After turning it was back to Barton Broad then down the River Ant - funny how the weather can change things for we had not had much in the way of rain but the wind direction and pressure had caused the tide to do strange things - it was incredibly tight under Ludham Bridge today indeed could not have had the camera attached to its mount for it would have been struck by the bridge.

Once through I decided to go to moorings at St. Benet's where I could pack all my gear up and do the boat review - it was exposed here and the wind was blowing onto the bank which was handy as it made mooring easier but would make the departure interesting later  - I helped a German family moor their 45ft Connoisseur from Herbert Woods of course this was when the World Cup was in full swing and they were confident they would be going all the way.  Well they might be good footballers in the World Cup but needed me to help them moor ;)

After the boat review was filmed it was time to decide what to do - the weather was getting more unsettled so I thought best return to the boatyard then I can head out for some nice Fish & Chips.  It felt like a long - almost sad journey back up the Bure to Wroxham.  The ain came and went, the wind would not let up but I thought back to all I had done the places visited and the hot sunny weather that I had enjoyed earlier in the week.

Once back in Wroxham I picked one of the last slots in the boatyard, there was a few other boats there with people on and had the feel people had hunkered down for the night already.  I walked into Wroxham and on a Friday early evening it certainly looks a forlorn place once Roy's has such up shop and so it was into Grays Fish & Chips - then a walk back to the boat the spots of raining once more returning - but only a short while after getting back on the boat the heavens opened and it rained and rained  and indeed did on and off most of the evening.

Once again though it was a lovely trip, and goes to show what a magnet the broads is - not to mention the many new things you can try and discover each time you come.  I've recently taken up cycling again after last rising a bike around the age of 15.  Now I am rising again and I can imagine how good it might be to ride in some of the countryside and especially if one had their own boat how a folding bike could bring a whole new perspective on things if nothing more to ride in to the likes of Rockland St. Mary for more beer and not have to carry it

Not Broads related of course, but should you want to see a 13 miles circuit Shiela and I did the other evening, you can watch it below - I am considering producing a new channel and recording these adventures

'River Circuit' - a tour of London from London Bridge, via Greenwich and under the Thames, back to London Bridge past the launch site of the Great Eastern and over Tower Bridge. Click Here to watch

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It is common belief that two do not go into one - however it just goes to show that one the Internet such rules can be pushed aside, for we have here two videos for your delectation cheers

 

The first, a Captain's Blog Special which chronicals a Cruise in Company that took place from the point of view of myself, having returned Brinks Royale back to Barnes Brinkcraft. While at the time I had no idea what events would unfold come the day - it was scheduled to be a coastal passage between Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft - in the end it was a more sedate river based Cruise in Company culminating in a BBQ at Beccles Yacht Station.

 

Watch the Captain's Blog Special video below:

 

http://youtu.be/_TEs1ioJdDY

 

But what many a follower of the this Holiday Tale has been waiting for is the Boat Review - and that is also ready for your viewing pleasure.  Brinks Royale is not the most practical of boats, but it does not pretend to be - it is a 'sporty boat' idea for a couple but will sleep up to four people. 

 

It has a great social space which on sunny days with the canopy stowed is lovely to sit out in the cockpit, a table is included for alfresco dining too.  A high boat affording good views but that height means bridge passages can be tricky at times and the boat is easily caught by the wind - not helped by the planning hull which lacks the keel of a displacement boat to keep things more on the straight than the wiggly.

Overall though I found Royale to be a very nice comfortable boat but I think having hired her I'll stick to the less sporty and more practical with things like more drawers and height and proper cabins.

 

Watch the Boast Review video below:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWkfphJFtSw&feature=youtu.be

 

And so that concludes this Holiday Tale and series of the Captain's Blog, I hope it has been an enjoyable read and watch over the course of videos and write ups here - until next time then, more as it happens...

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Hi Robin,

 

Interesting layout I must say. One thing is for sure, you need to be agile. I would require a crane to get in and out that bed! :naughty: Regarding going down those stairs/steps, maybe just me, but I would have went down in the reverse position to access below.

The boat certainly has some nice touches, (but a curtain in a 5star hmm) but agree that the lights should be changed to LED. I get the feeling though, its not one you would hire again?

 

cheers Iain.

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I have to give credit to Barnes Brinkcraft because they try things other yards tend not to - this is an example of getting a Seawings 305 mold modding things as far as putting a single engine in side ways on hydraulic drive and making a whole new rudder assembly then fitting the interior out - giving that 'sports cruiser feel' many people seem to like.

 

The problem is there are more compromises.  So space is at a premium, and you have to crawl into bed on the floor, yes there is a curtain but then there could not be a door even if you wished for one and overall I found the berth cosy and nice.

 

My real issue was not having a plug (or indeed a sink with a plughole designed to take a plug) in the heads and having to use the washing up bowel - now that is not so 5 star.  Of course there was the fuel usage, 116 litres which at their prices would have been over £160.00 but I availed myself of Boulters far cheaper fuel and brimmed the tank there.

 

Talking of fuel, I filled up the day before I had to take the boat back in Horning. The next morning I went to Wroxham, the went up the River Ant (day 6 in all the wind) to Paddy's Lane - popped up to Sutton and back to Paddy's Lane - next day -  the last day - Paddy's Lane, St Benet's moorings, then to the boatyard in Wroxham. 

 

I mean not the most super long of trips - still cost me £39.60 in fuel when Barnes Brinkcraft topped the tank up the next morning. 

 

Now they thought I had been very frugal only using about £40.00 in 7 days but boy did that boat drink the red stuff.

 

I would not hire it again based on the the above and the canopy faffing about.  Much nicer to have a sliding door like Omega to walk out into the rear of the boat.

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Keep these coming Robin these are brilliant as always!  That canopy seemed to be a huge let down.. lets hope they can rethink that!

 

My folks boat is an ex brinks and the hydraulic systems which apparently brinks love installing are soo thirsty.. it adds a fair few revs to even think about moving compared to a direct drive :( but it seems to make close maneuvering a bit easier :)

 

I have a question I've been dying to ask! Do you still pay to hire boats? surely, as considering you do a better job than certain companies (no names: BA and hoseasons) at marketing the broads surely you at least now get a nice discount? if not you certainly should do!

 

Also have you thought about looking at marthams or the timber maffets cruisers..? These are both very different boats (albeit proper boats!) and I'm sure as independents they would welcome your exposure (I have nothing to do with either.. although Janet is my favourite boat (followed by Silver melody who has now been sold! - Actually Janet was the last boat we hired and Melody was the first...).

 

cheers 

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Alan,

 

Thanks for the kind comment will  keep doing these because they have helped a fair few people either begin a love affair with the Broads, or rekindle it which makes all the time spent after the trip sat editing worth while.

 

Yes I pay when I hire - sometimes I will get a bit of a discount of a few percent but, it is certainly not a great deal and usually just covers the cost of my train fare in savings.

 

Whilst having some kind of affiliated scheme whereby I do videos and the yard in question give me a hefty discount or free hires might be nice for my wallet, one could always be thought of as not being impartial then.

 

I like to ensure what I say, experience and do is as anyone else who may holiday with said boatyard or on that boat might expect to experience.  Let us pretend when the shower pump broke (it was a huge blockage in the drainage pipe to skin fitting) or battery cell went taking the others with it Barnes Brinkcraft had not wanted to attend and sort matters out, then I would not keep such from a video review, however they did come to my aid and fixed that and a couple of other small things quickly and very professionally and that got top marks from me.

 

If they had given the boat for free it is possible for them to  begin to dictate what should be said, or done or not said etc which would jut turn what I do into nothing more than 'spin' - which would be completely pointless.  Take Herbert Woods as an example, they have a professional made video of a family's first trip - but one is left wonder is it a real family, or just actors - so it just becomes a super positive happy advert - the Captain's Blog is nothing like that.

 

It is a shame Herbert Woods, NBD and Horning Ferry Marina don't let solo hires or you would see reviews of their boats too.

 

It is possible that next year I will try something a little different, perhaps with Pacific Cruisers in Loddon - but I like to do as I wish to, some have asked I explore more above Potter Heigham Bridge, I might then again I may not I never plan anything each day is very much loosely put together and has a rough idea rather than a set plan.

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Very true points there Robin. I hadn't thought of it like that!

 

I can't recommend Marthams enough though and above potterham with a cruiser is amazing as its so quiet and overnighting feels special, so I hope you manage to do one day! I think you will also enjoy the different feel of a wooden cruiser :) 

 

We stopped at Pacific for the first time this summer.. just like you did and found them very welcoming just mooring and watched the handover they were very friendly so again I'm sure they will be a nice little yard to hire from. Looking forward to your visit!

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You are very right about Barnes trying new things. Saw this a few days ago:

@broadsholidays: Our new electric hybrid Brinks Rhapsody is out & about on the Broads, give them a wave if you see it! http://t.co/w6GgW9xubs

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Nice looking high tech boat, but yet another that cannot cruise parts of the Broads. :-(

 

cheers Iain.

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Hi Iain,

 

I have seen this done on Narrow Boats, it uses a fortune of sealed cells and a diesel/electric combination drives, similar to the car versions of Hybrid drives.

 

A fiend of mine has a Lexus Hybrid but he is trading it in for a new one before the battery warranty runs out.

 

Regards

Alan

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Hi Alan,

 

I have a friend who had a Toyota Prius Hybrid, it was nothing but trouble, plus Toyota were awkward during the warrenty. They have bought the new design Nissan Quashqai Acenta instead.

 

cheers Iain.

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Would you then classify this  cruiser concept as a "Gimic" or what? Personally, I think so, but I am sure others will think differently. I am all for progress in technology, just feel this aint it.

 

Sorry Robin, nicked your thread a bit. :oops:

 

 

cheers Iain.

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Do hybrid boats get preference at electric points like electric boats do.....?

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What has struck me is they have used ‘old fashion’ fixed solar panels not the more ‘modern’ flush sort that can look far nicer – take what Richardson’s use on their boats and are sealed to the cabin roof – no frame and if someone was to sit/walk over them likely they will not be harmed.

 

Anyway – for years now Barnes Brinkcraft have been doing things differently, phasing out gas on boats and bringing in electric ceramic hobs – most of the eclectic supply on their boats now is at 24v for heating, the fridge and microwave and inverter – they like Victron charger inverter combination units (not cheap) and use Rolls branded batteries (not cheap at all) and then just fill up the boat with batteries – Royale had 7 batteries on it.

 

How this will work I presume is to have a Nanni Hybrid Propulsion Drive.  Nanni say:

 

Thermal Propulsion only: when the diesel engine is running for fast or long range cruising, or when weather conditions are too rough.

 

Electric propulsion only: with a power up to 7 kW in 48 V DC, using the energy stored in a dedicated battery bank for silent and zero emission cruising.

 

Onboard power generation: when the diesel engine is running and driving the propeller, or not. Batteries can also be charged by the shore power to allow electric propulsion only.

 

Regeneration (for sailboats only): when sailing with the engine off, the water flow is rotating the propeller which drives the Power Unit, hence charging the batteries at a small rate as a hydro generator.

 

 

I guess therefore since the boat has no sails, those big solar panels will top up the batteries for ‘regeneration’ – then have a bunch of batteries as per normal for running the boats systems and then the engine can be run as a generator when doing things like cooking on the hob.

 

They should of come up with a fancy name though than just ‘Hybrid Electric’ something cool sounding such as ‘This new boat is driven an all new hybrid electric system known as the Barnes Eco Drive’. 

 

Anyway see how things pan out someone has to give these things a trial and take the plunge...

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