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I have a feeling that the wherry in that last postcard on the Waveney was Bramble. Was this image used as a cover for one of Blake's brochures in the 30s? There are some lovely memories out there on the internet from someone who lived aboard her at Beccles during the war: http://www.sailing-by.org.uk/born-aboard-wherry-bramble-1940/

Carol

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Somerleyton, 1908. That the left hand wherry carries a burgee rather than a vane suggests that she's a pleasure wherry, perhaps the Gypsy, a boat that went to Bohemia in the 1890s.

Somerleyton c1908.jpg

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A  Norfolk Wherry in Suffolk, on Lake Lothing, posted 1911.

Lowestoft Sunset with wherry.jpg

Lowestoft Inner Harbour wherry & smacks.jpg

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Yet another Wherry picture, this time a wherry-yacht at Beccles, possibly 1930's. Anyone know the name of her, she must be unique with that clipper bow?

Beccles yacht station & wherry yacht.jpg

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Another wherry picture of a wherry, the black hulled boat, but is she really a 'wherry'? Her name is Jester and she's on the National Historical Ship's list as an 'ice wherry' and it's suggested that she's a surviving wherry on Wikipedia. She was owned by a Cyril Richards for many years, a Lowestoft shipbuilder and Broads yachtsman. Cyril was a close family friend and I never heard him call her anything other than an ice barge.  I believe that she was built by Chambers, not a recognised wherry builder. Still, she's listed as a surviving wherry! Another one for the experts!

Oulton Broad Post Cards7.jpg

JESTER_1.jpg

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They say that a wherry is just a name for a workboat. There used to be wherries on the Thames at Greenwich, to lighten big ships that wanted to get upstream to the pool of London. I believe they were known in Southampton water as well.

The name just seems to have stuck to the Norfolk version!

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Back to a 'real' wherry, one that's flying a Leo Robinson's burgee, seen here near Beccles. Not exactly a quality reproduction but at least it sails!

Beccles Robinson Wherry.jpg

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A Wherry at Ellingham Mill on the Waveney. I've printed this one on fullscap, looks good on the wall, amongst other wherry pictures.

Waveney by Edmund Blair Leighton, chaff.jpg

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Another cracker Pete!! I really do hope you have all your wherry pictures properly archived - there are too many "private" collections that have been lost!!! The Wherry Trust archive continues to grow - please feel free to dive in!!

I like how it has been stylised by the artist. Or is it a coloured photo - looks too good to be true! But the detail is good - you can see quite clearly the wooden foot rest although not yet seen any crew who have that long legs!  Note too that it seems to be based on a Walkers wherry but a boring clinker one! And the quant poles look too short and spindley but I am just being picky!

Thanks for posting that - love it!! ( Who is the artist? )

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26 minutes ago, marshman said:

Who is the artist? 

Oil on canvas painting titled 'Chaff' by Edmund Blair Leighton (1852-1922). Feel free to right click and save any of 'my' pictures. I'm quite certain, judging by the perspective, that the artist used photographs for reference if not for copying.

Re short quants, the Dutch often have, in English, 'shove sticks' that they use to help work their barges through locks. It would seem quite likely that Norfolk wherrymen working the Upper Waveney locks might have done the same.

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Don't tell the volunteers about "light" quants - I see a mutiny arising!!!!!

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1 hour ago, marshman said:

Don't tell the volunteers about "light" quants - I see a mutiny arising!!!!!

Carbon Fibre would be good!

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I see your point but would be difficult to "plant" in water of any depth!

Going back to Mr Leighton, I see he has done a few waterscapes some of which look like the Waveney Valley but he is better known for his figures, often courting, which perhaps explains the detail surrounding the "wherryman" and the girls but it does have a real charm to me. Thanks again

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1 hour ago, marshman said:

I see your point but would be difficult to "plant" in water of any depth!

Perhaps a shove stick would be useful for pushing away from lock walls and the like rather than a distant bottom.

Mr Leighton's picture could make a nice screen saver. Yes, it does have a certain charm.

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