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I believe in the correct tool for the job, sometimes a cheaper tool will do, I still have the same basis hand tools I have had in my tool bag/case that I had over 30 years ago.

With regards to woodwork tools however I do spend a lot of time inspecting and getting the feel of a tool before purchasing it especially on hand planes.

Regards

Alan 

DSC_0009.JPG

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3 hours ago, ranworthbreeze said:

I believe in the correct tool for the job, sometimes a cheaper tool will do, I still have the same basis hand tools I have had in my tool bag/case that I had over 30 years ago.

With regards to woodwork tools however I do spend a lot of time inspecting and getting the feel of a tool before purchasing it especially on hand planes.

Regards

Alan 

DSC_0009.JPG

You'd have got a clip round the ear 'ole for that,  from my old wood work teacher. " Never place the plane on its face even if you've wound the blade in."

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its plain (plane) that is just for display purposes

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14 hours ago, TheQ said:

You'd have got a clip round the ear 'ole for that,  from my old wood work teacher. " Never place the plane on its face even if you've wound the blade in."

Hi Q, we were always taught the same by our woodwork teacher, a great guy taught me a lot. I often wondered what happened to the 6 to 8 Stanley number 1 planes that used to be in the tool store, these were good for the younger children being so small, I do have one and these days they are very expensive, but in all honesty I prefer to use a number 2 for the fine work.

Regards

Alan 

 

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On 23/06/2019 at 17:42, TheQ said:

You'd have got a clip round the ear 'ole for that,  from my old wood work teacher.

I remember we had woodwork for half a lesson on a Thursday morning and a double lesson on a Friday morning. On the Thursday our teacher, Spud, gave a lesson on how the planes were kept very sharp and they should always be laid on their sides and not on the sole. He then reached over the bench for something, caught the plane blade with his wrist and sliced it open. Friday morning we had the local undertaker take the woodwork lesson. We thought we'd killed Spud not realising the undertaker had a joinery shop to make coffins. His first lesson was to tell us that the plane is a sharp tool and to always put it down on the sole to avoid slitting your wrists and becoming his next customer for his day job. 'Tha kin allas resharpen thi blade and reset thi plane, it's 'ell of a job stitchin thi wrist up wi't wrong 'and lads!'.

Now I was in the 'remedial' class for woodwork, those kids whothey assumed would not have a need ever for woodwork or metalwork. We made 'things', often as not wonky, from twisted timber and acrylic sheet in 'institution yellow'. The only time we ever made anything useful, straight and recognisable was when Mr Fields the undertaker took the lessons for two months. He helped us make simple wooden tea trays, letter openers and a letter rack. Needless to say these were the only pieces any of us entered in our final exam even though we had another year of Spud when he returned. My most cherished qualification is my Grade 5 CSE Woodwork...its still a pass mark! :default_blush:

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we had the benches with the lower section down the middle, so planes were always placed with the toe in the well and the heel in fresh air with the blade sitting somewhere above the well

OLD-SCHOOL-WOODWORKING-BENCH-SOLID-WOOD-CUPBOARDS-1960s-VINTAGE.jpg

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11 hours ago, Timbo said:

My most cherished qualification is my Grade 5 CSE Woodwork...its still a pass mark! :default_blush:

And now he confesses that he's actually qualified :facepalm:

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Just now, JanetAnne said:

And now he confesses that he's actually qualified :facepalm:

My bad, I was confusing 'qualified' with 'certified':default_norty:

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