Jump to content
  • Announcements

    Welcome! New around here? Take a look at the New Members' Guide for some pointers.

    Not a member yet? Sign up here and you can soon be chatting away with friends old and new..

    Check out our Handy Information section if you're after something quickly!

Electric Windlass / winch - the "big lift"


Recommended Posts

We need to find an easy solution to the rise and fall of the mudweight. Corsica weighs in at around 7.5 tonnes and we would like to be able to release and recover a mudweight without having to have the physical aspects of the "big lift". Has anyone any experience or recommendations regarding the electric powered option. We expect to have to put in a chain locker etc. but what sort of windlass works best??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you want to take up as little deck space as possible then a vertical is the way to go, this is at the expense of chain locker space of course. A vertical is easier to clear any jam from but does take up more deck space. There is of course the option of a cheap alternative of a winch designed for vehicle use, again that takes up deck space, has a lot more trip and snag potential and is not really, in my view the way to go unless cost is the absolute consideration.

Here’s a link to a video on retro fitting that you may find useful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input David.

Our biggest concern is making sure we get something that is completely functional and least likely to give any problems. there is certainly space for a chain locker under the foredeck in the front of the forward cabin, and the fordeck itself is quite large too so should accommodate either style. I don't think the type used on vehicles is going to be suitable long term.

Best regards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd go for a horizontal type in that case Simon, with a combined rope and chain gypsy, try to get one with "free fall" either switch or clutch operated as winching down a mud weight slowly is not really the best way to get it embedded. If you have the room then fit a battery forward in order to keep the heavier cables as short as possible, this will reduce voltage drop, any difficulty routing and cost. The runs of charging and solenoid cables will be easier than heavy stuff and cheaper. The one thing worth robbing from road transport is the wireless remote, this links into any windlass solenoid very simply and allows you to operate from any position without any cable runs and they are about £40 for a good quality waterproof type.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The horizontal style looks to be the better option, just for no other reason than its less likely to be a trip hazard! We have a bowthruster and the battery for that is under the forward cabin bunks and its charged from the alternators. I'm kind of guessing that we could link up the bowthruster battery to the winch to reduce any voltage drop? do you think that would work?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The horizontal style looks to be the better option, just for no other reason than its less likely to be a trip hazard! We have a bowthruster and the battery for that is under the forward cabin bunks and its charged from the alternators. I'm kind of guessing that we could link up the bowthruster battery to the winch to reduce any voltage drop? do you think that would work?

If the battery is heavy enough then yes of course and is exactly what we have, you would never be using the windlass without the engine running and of course you would never be running both windlass and thruster together, its not like you'll be dragging 50m of 10mm chain and associated annchor up from the sea bed as we do so if ours copes (2 x 6v 110 for ease of removal) then I see nothing but upsides from doing as you suggest. One point, a windlass is not for breaking out, you should really drive forward taking in scope until directly overhead and then break out with the boat and raise the anchor with the windlass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David.

That's been a huge help, thank you so much.

I know I sound a bit like "Columbo" off the TV, but "just one more question".....

Do you reckon a 30 kg mudweight with 10 metres of chain and rope mix will be adequate to hold Corsica (7.5 tons) in most conditions? We're not talking hurricane force winds here, just the average weathers we get during a typical broads season?

Best regards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I think that will be more than enough Simon, 66lbs is a hell of a weight, :o I would perhaps add a bit more rope to take the whole scope up to say 60 or 70 feet then you should have enough for emergency use on breydon too, perhaps even a quick change shackle so you can substitute a proper anchor in case of emergency too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm getting a strange feeling of Déjà vu here ! (from "another" place.. ) :grin:

The horizontal style looks to be the better option, just for no other reason than its less likely to be a trip hazard!

I think you must mean that the vertical is less of a trip hazard Simon ?

Here's another view from above of my South Pacific vertical, with the chain/rope stainless steel gypsy.

It shows that I did have to move the cleat slightly off-centre, in order to get the winch lined up fore and aft.

post-669-136713774964_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awkward if you don't have sight of it Jim, you can use a helm mounted chain counter or get Jonathan to fit you a camera. :naughty:

Seriously, that’s one of the reasons I like the wireless remote, you can then do it from anywhere you like even single handed. I usually have to go on the fore deck anyway to secure the anchor as I always tie it down after recovery to take the strain off the windlass, maybe not so important when you don’t get kicked about so much but still worth consideration.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/WIRELESS-WINCH-REMOTE-CONTROL-12V-12-VOLT-RECOVERY-4X4_W0QQitemZ190385624063QQcmdZViewItem?rvr_id=161038512464&rvr_id=161038512464&cguid=ed7a79ea12a0a0a9f4b1e7b1fffba28d

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Or how about trying a downward facing mirror fixed on the Pulpit Rail ?

Like the ones fitted to the rear window of some MPVs.

You'd even be able to see the weight itself coming up, let alone the winch ! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm getting a strange feeling of Déjà vu here ! (from "another" place.. ) :grin:

I think you must mean that the vertical is less of a trip hazard Simon ?

Here's another view from above of my South Pacific vertical, with the chain/rope stainless steel gypsy.

It shows that I did have to move the cleat slightly off-centre, in order to get the winch lined up fore and aft.

OUCH.

Did I tread on someone's toes Strowager ??

""I'm getting a strange feeling of Déjà vu here ! (from "another" place.. ) "".

I'm known by some yards as "Mr Hands Off". Unlike many, I recognise I am NOT a technical person and as such need to be as comfortable as possible when I commit to making changes ( and investment) to my boat.

All I'm trying to do is find out as much as I can from ALL the resources available and at the same time to be appreciative of ALL the advice I receive.

If I'm committing some form of breach of forums etiquet please PM me. Right now I feel uncertain of where to go next.

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I'm just a nobody Simon, not connected with any forums in any way other than reading and posting.

I apologies unreservedly if my "Déjà vu" reference has been taken any way other than I intended, (humorously). :)

If the Mods on here considered there'd been a breach of forum etiquette, it's probably me they'd be telling to bu**er off, for maybe discouraging another poster.

I was just trying to help with whatever information and pics I could, wherever your questions popped up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed Simon, you carry on, though I suspect Stowies remark was tongue in cheek as is often the case. :naughty:;)

The more places you ask the more you learn of other peoples experiences and opinions, well in most cases anyway. ;)

Edit to say: Ah, no need for this post it seems, I'll leave it anyway just for clarity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some time ago I posted the same query on here and received a combination of helpful answers as this one has. Because of cost restraints I decided to go down the 4x4 winch route. This may not look athletically as good as a conventional capstan /marine winch the cost difference convinced me to try it. £300 including wireless remote and synthetic rope as opposed to wire rope and fitting ect and probably £1000 plus for the capstan type. If you are interested this winch will pull up to 1ton .

post-353-136713774977_thumb.jpg

post-353-136713775006_thumb.jpg

post-353-136713775291_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

probably £1000 plus for the capstan type

I fitted a car type winch to my previous boat, because I also got the impression that all electric capstans were about £600 plus (after a jaw dropping session in Norfolk Marine) :)

The one in my photo was £275 though, including switch and circuit breaker. I found it on Compass24, made by a company called "South Pacific", based in Australia I believe. http://www.compass24.com/web/catalog/shop/technics_chandlery_anchor_winch (bottom row on that page).

They're cheaper apparently because they use spur gearing, which means they can use lower wattage motors to get the same lifting power, (saves on cable size too). I bought the vertical one with stainless steel gypsy that takes 8mm calibrated chain and 14mm 3 strand rope.

My boat has quite a capacious chain locker with a good drop, which I would say is essential when using rope spliced to the chain, because when it stiffens up a bit, it needs a couple of feet drop to snake properly without jamming. Conversely though, the stiffness of old rope is better for the gypsy wheel, grips around it nicely without sticking.

I've used it for about 6 months now, and so far so good... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Strowager

Guess I must have misunderstood your response. :oops:

No offence taken - and - now I'm sure - none meant.

I'm very much a novice in all things technical. that includes computers and Forums.

You will often find I'm on line, but I'm just reading the posts to increase my understanding of the wealth of information that is so often available from a great many of the UK's boating forums.

My posts are genuinely because I feel that I might either be able to give some input, or because I respect the fountain of knowledge that is so freely available to members of forums.

So lets move onwards and upwards.

I reckon the australian winch, as you have fitted already, will most likely fit the bill on corsica. so thank you for the input and also that of everyone else that has made so many excellent contributions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • NBN Mobile App

  • Our Sponsors

    Norfolk Broads Network is run by volunteers - You can help us run it by making a donation

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

For details of our Guidelines, please take a look at the Terms of Use here.