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Rope Cutter Tests


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Interesting feature in January's upcoming MBM, testing various Rope Cutters against a variety of likely Prop fouling materials.

Interesting Video trailer they have produced showing some of the makes in action.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=WADETXBD3Pc&eurl=

We have one of the models featured fitted to Kiki and while not foolproof it gives us some comfort when trying to avoid those bl**dy Pots :cry:

Also shows the benefit of using some reverse the minute you think your prop may be fouled.

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All seem to work prety well especialy that gaiter, you could always run stern drives, just bring the prop to the surface at the touch of a button and unwind the rope. xmas3

Not if you're anchored to the sea bed on a string of pots by your stern with a good run of tide you can't Ian :o:o that's my main fear, and the reason we have one fitted.

The shock to the drivetrain by having it all stopped abruptly can do loads of damage too so I see these things as a bit of insurance.

On the last trip down we found ouselves in several strings of pots that would have put Hampton Court Maze to shame so was glad to have it then, though it was not needed, either that or it did it's job unnoticed :naughty::naughty:

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Unfortunately I don't think you can fit them to Volvo DPs so will be taking a dip if that situation arrises to cut lose the pots before unwinding them, at least they will be at the back of the boat, or they will as long as the stern drives are still there.

Out of interest which one do you two have fitted and has anybody else fitted these for river use?

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Ian,

I have Prop Protector it was recommended by Viking Marin as being simple to fit, no moving parts to go wrong and relatively cheap when compared to other options.

Rope Cutters are one of those things as David has eluded to that you never really know if are working or not, if you have no issues.

It might be worth you investing in a set of Long Arm Bolt Croppers as a back up and probably in preference to any SCUBA activities :naughty:

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We have the Volvo one Ian, simple rotary knife I like the no moving parts type, they may not be quite as effective as the scissor type but are very simple and straight forward. The problem with the polypropylene string favoured by many broads boats is that when it does get in the prop it is not a simple case of unwinding it. What you end up with is a mass of welded together string that needs removing with a hacksaw, ask any broads diver. At least on the river you have the option to use one engine if you have twins or with a single disabled engine you can “kite†to the bank and sort the job out.

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At least on the river you have the option to use one engine if you have twins or with a single disabled engine you can “kite†to the bank and sort the job out.

Of course if your sensible and fly sheets from a pole you just carry on enjoying the day! Has anybody noticed that diesel has a nasty niff? xmas2

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Of course if your sensible and fly sheets from a pole you just carry on enjoying the day! Has anybody noticed that diesel has a nasty niff? xmas2

Clearly the words of somebody who's never been on or seen a yacht under sail snagged on a string of pots or trammel nets by it's rudder and being dragged down by the stern. Truth is that due to the rudder depth and keel configuration a yacht can actually be more at risk in certain conditions, especially on big springs around the top of the tide. This is the offshore section, obviously that would be less likely on a shallow keeled and ruddered broads yacht, but that's for debate elsewhere, perhaps the broads related chat for instance. :naughty:

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I have only once encounrtered string and that was on the river, probably due to my limited sea hours. It was the realy nasty cheap 8 or 10 mm blue nylon stuff but even at river speeds the amount of vibration felt instantly meant you new it was there, was fortunate and probably helped by the fast shut down of the drive but was able to simply lift the leg and unwind it.

Given how close the legs are together at sea speeds once you pick up on one I would think it stands a good chance of fouling the other anyway.

has anyone encountered a lobster pot on stern drives and what was the result?

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has anyone encountered a lobster pot on stern drives and what was the result?

Not me (on a sterndrive) Ian, I would be quite certain that if you pose the question on the Mobo area of the rough boys site there will be plenty of answers. Strangely there's a discussion about snagging pots there right now. It is mostly concerned with night passages and the extra risks they involve but pots and nets are the greater part of it.

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This is the offshore section, obviously that would be less likely on a shallow keeled and ruddered broads yacht, but that's for debate elsewhere, perhaps the broads related chat for instance. :naughty:

That's put me in my place. I'll get my coat. :bow

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I have been considering a cutting disc type for my boat and after seeing the demo I have now decided to get one fitted the next time she is out of the water. I believe they are quite inexpensive and simple to fit.

Rod

Not something that would give the props on the stuff you drive at sea much of a problem Rod :dance

Piece of wee wee to fit, assuming you have a little bit of shaft exposed you don't even have to take the prop off as the discs are split. Certainly is a good deal of room for crossover and there is always something to share, but there are also major differences that have to be taken into account. :grin::grin:

Ponky, no need to get your coat, stay and discuss it :grin:

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Oh bugger Ian, I bet you're begining to regret asking the rough boys now :o:o It does all make interesting (if a little worrying) reading. I hate those tramell nets, both from a sustainable fishing and safety point of view and it is illegal to leave them unattended but people do nevertheless. One point worth remembering is all the guys that replied so far rack up some serious miles so their chances are therefore higher than most.

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Bit frightening David, but at least all the boats made it home under there own steam, even at 24 knots to a dead stop the leg stayed on, ok with substantial damage. No matter how big the bilge pumps with a hole that size in the stern it is going to go down prety quickly and without any power to at least try and outrun the water you are going down where you hit.

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