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MY littleboat

East Anglian Film Archive - Now all free to watch online

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The archive is now online with some full length fascinating films - following a posting on another forum, I highly recommend this one - 'Where Broadland Meets the Sea' - a look at Lowestoft, Oulton Broad and surrounding areas!

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/274

The film concludes with a unique piece of hiring a Hoeseasons boat from Oulton Broad and venturing out onto the Waveny! Fascinating

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We've spent the last two evenings sitting up until gone 2am trawling through the EAFA website - there are some absolute gems on there and it is so wonderful that they have been able to make all of this stuff available online. I hope they can continue to get the necessary funding to continue the excellent work.

Some of the other Broads films include this Hoseasons promo film from 1971 which follows a family around Broadland onboard Santa Caterina from Harvey Eastwood's .... although with a bit of artistic licence they actually seem to start their holiday on it from Astons boatyard at Loddon !

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/451

The Norwich section contains some equally exciting footage such as this one from 1962 which follows a journey by river from Thorpe, up the Wensum into Norwich. Some great shots of the industrial riverside area:

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/1714

Also in amongst the Norwich films is a very poignant home movie, filmed in colour by an American serviceman in 1945 of the bomb damaged city and the graves of those killed during the blitz raids, and street scenes from the late 1950s to 1970s when the slum clearance saw vast swaithes of the city being bulldozed to make way for tower blocks and shopping centres!

On a weird and wacky note .... they have a few films made by the early British film maker Arthur Melbourne-Cooper who was a pioneer in stop frame animation. This truly bizarre animation which features a dream sequence in which a young child's toys come to life and start having punch ups is just incredible. I had no idea that this technique dated back so far, and this particular film dates from 1907 would you believe!!

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/1893

I just find this all so exciting!

Carol

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A couple more gems here

How about the Hoeseasons ad

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/226410

And this film, made for the maritime England year of 1982 even has a great piece about 'Albion' as well a great look at the East Anglian ports and an early look at Dana Anglia (DFDS) being bought into Parkestone Quay by the pilot (One for Rod!)

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/553

And more Broads on this film at including Reedham Ferry at 14.49

http://www.eafa.org.uk/catalogue/549

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Just watched the Hoeseasons film! Fab - Nice to see that marketing gurus in those days weren't shy of using a 'model' family! Almost reminiscent of the Alan Partridge film! :grin:

And who are h'seasons ??? lol

Interesting point though, there is a hull layup taking place - looks to be laying timber over a fibreglass inner or if not can someone give insight into this? 03.55 point

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Just watched the Hoeseasons film! Fab - Nice to see that marketing gurus in those days weren't shy of using a 'model' family! Almost reminiscent of the Alan Partridge film! :grin:

And who are h'seasons ??? lol

Interesting point though, there is a hull layup taking place - looks to be laying timber over a fibreglass inner or if not can someone give insight into this? 03.55 point

I haven't had a chance to watch it yet, but I do know that some yacht manufacturers (SADLER being the one where I came across it) have used a grp / balsa /grp sandwich construction for their hulls. The Sadler 36 for example is reputed to be unsinkable as the volume of the hull moulding itself is sufficient to keep her afloat even if she fills with water.

(I went out on one up in Scotland with a guy who moaned about being forced to carry a liferaft on an unsinkable boat (Ok he was a Scot and was more annoyed at being forced to pay out for a liferaft!), but I suppose there is always the risk of fire or an explosion which would make it impossible to stay on the yacht.

Current sea-survival instruction for sea going boats is that you only abandon the hull when it is on fire or when you have to step UP into the liferaft.

Look up the Fastnet race disaster to see why!)

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