Jump to content
  • Announcements

    Welcome! New around here? Take a look at the New Members' Guide for some pointers.

    Not a member yet? Sign up here and you can soon be chatting away with friends old and new..

    Check out our Handy Information section if you're after something quickly!

Wood you, or wood you not?


Guest plesbit

Recommended Posts

No, it's not a typo, just me doing odd.

Question is basically about wood. There are a number of areas on the interior of our boat where the woodwork needs repairing or replacing. The question is basically about which types of wood are suitable for use on boats. I notice, for example, teak (though incredibly expensive) is very popular and there must be a reason why. Correspondingly pine is cheap and plentiful but I've never heard of it in a boat.

I need to select some wood to make batons and cupboards / shelves etc and I want to make sure I select something appropriate. Also, where is the best place to get this kind of thing? I know B&Q is probably the wrong answer but the fact is they are opposite where I work so very easy to get to, otherwise I have to drive into Norwich somewhere which makes opportunities to go shopping far more limited.

One final thought - although I really dislike it myself, the interior of our boat is a slightly old fashioned dark wood finish. It's not completely clear what colour the wood would be if it didn't have a ton of dark varnish all over but I am guessing it would not have been that light in colour to start with. It would therefore probably be best to avoid something extremely light in colour (like beech) and then varnish or stain it to within an inch of its life to try to make it match.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For interior joinery in a GRP motor cruiser, you can use pretty much whatever species of wood you like. Teak is traditional, but ridiculously expensive these days. Plenty of narrowboats have wooden interiors made from Ash, Beech, or White Oak.

While species is not particularly important, the quality of the wood is. 'Pine' from places like B&Q is often of pretty terrible quality (huge growth rings, grain runout, large knots, multiple pieces glued together, etc) - if you're doing anything that's going to be seen, it's worth taking the time and cash to get decent wood to start with. Not only will the end result look better, it'll be a lot easier to achieve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The tricky part is that a lot of what's going to be visible will be panels, rather than solid framework.

Although there are now some hybrid panels now available from (very) specialist suppliers, the usual choice is plywood.

It wouldn't need to be Marine quality, (since hopefully, it won't be immersed !), but at least exterior grade would be a good precaution just in case.

The best local supplier to the Broads that I know is Tim Collin, at Hoveton. I've spent many an hour in his small yard, selecting bits of wood and having a natter. The apparently "small" looking yard is misleading though, he has other premises, and he has been supplying specialist timber to the local boat builders on a very large scale for many decades now. Many a time I've witnessed craftsmen from Brundall selecting exotic woods like cherry for one-off Gin Palaces.

I had a couple of sheets of far-eastern mahogany faced marine ply at £60 a go that turned out very nice on a rebuild project a few years back. I've never been able to match the beautiful finish (after varnishing) with any plywood bought from B&Q, Wickes etc.. Their exterior ply looks nice as bought, but goes strange colours when varnished (even orange once !). :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a couple of sheets of far-eastern mahogany faced marine ply at £60 a go that turned out very nice on a rebuild project a few years back.

Now this sounds exactly like what I am looking for and Hoveton is just up the road so no big deal paying a visit. He's moved straight to the top of list - thanks Strowager.

There are a variety of different requirements to serve here so it won't all need to be the above but at least some of it will, just to get a matching look on the surface.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think there is a place in Wroxham Simon, the name of it escapes me just now :?

I can't remember the name either, but it is on the Rhond. Take the left fork at Barnes dayboat area and it is on the right hand side past Fineway dayboats before Sabena marine. It's a funny little shed with a couple of typical Norfolk chaps running it (helpful guys too). I'm sure if it wasn't too much you needed they wouldn't rip you off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not use exterior ply and finish it with a veneer. You can then chose a good match for what you have or re veneer the whole lot. It allows you to fix things from the outside before the veneer goes on and is a lot easier to trim the thin veneer for a neat finish.

Jonathan :Stinky

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When it really has to be teak, these people are stockists:-

http://www.kjhowells.com/

They produce teak products but also sell solid wood (and veneered sheets).

Many items are mail order, but it depends where you live whether buying teak veneered sheets from them is viable or not (as you have to pick it up from Poole).

You could always combine it with a break in the New Forest.

How about this for a place to stay?:-

http://www.themasterbuilders.co.uk/

:naughty:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Teak is traditionally used because of it's durabilty and good weathering qualities, but like most all hardwoods, is expensive.

A cheaper alternative is Iroko, which is also known as African Teak, albeit its not Teak as you would know it. There has been some discussion that the dust generated when machining Iroko may be carcenogenic, so maybe not the best material to work with under DiY conditions (i.e. no dust extraction system).

Good quality wpb/marine ply plywood, can be can be very effectively stained teak (or any other colour), and then given several coats of satin finish varnish (rubbed down with very fine sandpaper/flourpaper between coats), to give a very pleasing finish. It can be supported on a low cost pine framework, which is not seen once the plywood panels are attached.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never had any success in staining WBP to look as good as genuine mahogany faced ply.

I found it very difficult to get any consistency between sheets in the final colour once you start trying to stain it as well as varnish.

I think if anyone was trying to refurbish the interior of a medium sized boat with new wood, good quality ply would be essential to match the quality of the original finish of something like a Freeman or an Eastwood.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Used to able to get faced WBP; not sure if its still possible. But you can stick very thin facing marine ply to WBP - still a lot cheaper than marine ply . For interior work the possibility of rather larger voids in WBP is neither here nor there.

Staining ordinary WBP produces what it sounds like - a lash up!!! It never really looks the job!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:grin: Well I wouldn't call this a lash up, it's cheap basic 6mm WBP ply stained using a mix of Antique Pine and Dark Mahogany stain (after a lot of testing to get the colour to match) then four coats of Satin Varnish, the whole of the inside of my Seamaster has been replaced with normal WBP ply by me, and done in such a way that every panel is easy to remove and replace,,, Oh! forgot that second picture is before I added all the trim,,

Regards Frank,,,

post-132-136713699724_thumb.jpg

post-132-136713699731_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest DAYTONA-BILL
When it really has to be teak, these people are stockists:-

http://www.kjhowells.com/

They produce teak products but also sell solid wood (and veneered sheets).

Many items are mail order, but it depends where you live whether buying teak veneered sheets from them is viable or not (as you have to pick it up from Poole).

You could always combine it with a break in the New Forest.

How about this for a place to stay?:-

http://www.themasterbuilders.co.uk/

:naughty:

We live just outside Poole on the fringes of the New Forrest, so for an exceptionally large extortionate fee you can stay here :lol::lol::lol::lol: . Seriously though, if you are intending to come down here, give us a call and we can meet up. Any visit to Poole would be a waste if you don`t go to the quay and see the bikes on a Tuesday evening, or a trip on one of the many Harbour cruises. Regards .......... Neil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • NBN Mobile App

  • Our Sponsors

    Norfolk Broads Network is run by volunteers - You can help us run it by making a donation

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

For details of our Guidelines, please take a look at the Terms of Use here.