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LoloPaul

Trouble With Wind!

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'Morning everyone,

Having been the proud owner of Tisca, a little Sumatra 755, for a year now and acknowledging I am still a beginner, I thought I had got the hang of mooring and unmooring(?), but twice in the last few days I've been pinned against the quay heading by a relatively gentle wind. I had thought that pushing the stern out using full left lock (both times I was moored port side to the quay) and engine in forward would then allow me to reverse out far enough to use the bow thruster to bring the bow round and gently move off to nods of approval from any onlookers.

The reality this week has been some frantic backwarding and forwarding with a lot of engine revving as the wind returned the stern to the quay.

Can anyone please advise a foolproof method of moving off in such circumstances?

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9 minutes ago, LoloPaul said:

Can anyone please advise a foolproof method of moving off in such circumstances?

Why ask on here . . . you must be aware we're all fools? :default_dunce:.

What you're doing is exactly what I'd do, but if the wind's too strong, there's not much you can do. In the past I've held a few turns of the bow line round a post for people, to stop the boat travelling forward while the back gets out far enough, but if you're solo that's not an option.

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16 minutes ago, LoloPaul said:

'Morning everyone,

Having been the proud owner of Tisca, a little Sumatra 755, for a year now and acknowledging I am still a beginner, I thought I had got the hang of mooring and unmooring(?), but twice in the last few days I've been pinned against the quay heading by a relatively gentle wind. I had thought that pushing the stern out using full left lock (both times I was moored port side to the quay) and engine in forward would then allow me to reverse out far enough to use the bow thruster to bring the bow round and gently move off to nods of approval from any onlookers.

The reality this week has been some frantic backwarding and forwarding with a lot of engine revving as the wind returned the stern to the quay.

Can anyone please advise a foolproof method of moving off in such circumstances?

Hello Paul,

It can be down to the location that makes it difficult to moor or move off from a mooring. Areas that come instantly to mind are Stokesby on the green or in front of the pub, the 24 hour mooring just through St. Olaves Bridge. I have always had to leave the mooring at Stokesby in reverse the current tends to pin you to the moorings, likewise at St. Olaves the current always wants to push you into the bridge.

Regards

Alan

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6 minutes ago, Regulo said:

Why ask on here . . . you must be aware we're all fools? :default_dunce:.

What you're doing is exactly what I'd do, but if the wind's too strong, there's not much you can do. In the past I've held a few turns of the bow line round a post for people, to stop the boat travelling forward while the back gets out far enough, but if you're solo that's not an option.

Thanks Regulo. Mrs. LP is usually on hand to assist but the boat’s configuration doesn’t allow use of a bow line to secure the front and she’s not confident enough to wield a boat hook from the swim platform to keep the stern from returning to the side.

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4 minutes ago, ranworthbreeze said:

Hello Paul,

It can be down to the location that makes it difficult to moor or move off from a mooring. Areas that come instantly to mind are Stokesby on the green or in front of the pub, the 24 hour mooring just through St. Olaves Bridge. I have always had to leave the mooring at Stokesby in reverse the current tends to pin you to the moorings, likewise at St. Olaves the current always wants to push you into the bridge.

Regards

Alan

Thanks Alan, my two recent incidents were at How Hill and Ludham bridge so wouldn’t have thought they should  have been a problem.

Perhaps I was getting too cocky and needed a slap down by the elements.

Regards,

Paul

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There are so many variables to consider that your question has no set answer. How much room you have ahead and astern are relevant but if space is tight whilst the onshore breeze still plays a part, the current less so.

Where I do find myself disagreeing with you (if only just a bit) is your planned use of your bow thruster. it will be a bit counter productive as while it's sending the bow out, it's also pushing the stern back in.

You would be better off if, in the example you used, you put the helm hard to port and using both forward and astern gears, kicked the stern alone out into clear water, (do all this keeping the helm over to port). When the stern is in clear water, keep going astern pulling the whole boat into the stream. When all into clear water, into forward gear, helm to starboard, and Bob's your uncle. 

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Use a long line to the bank , then back to the boat.

Drive forward against the bank and the mooring rope, , when the stern of the boat is out far enough release the bow line and the person on the bow can pull the line back in while you're reversing.

Alternatively the tide is often stronger than the wind, release the end pointing into the tide, the boat should swing out, then release the other end and motor off in forward or reverse as required..

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Looking at the boat database, I see your craft is a sports style boat. Is she engined for performance or gentle broads use? If she's engined for pootling, some extra ballast might help her to be less skittish in a breeze.

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46 minutes ago, MauriceMynah said:

There are so many variables to consider that your question has no set answer. How much room you have ahead and astern are relevant but if space is tight whilst the onshore breeze still plays a part, the current less so.

Where I do find myself disagreeing with you (if only just a bit) is your planned use of your bow thruster. it will be a bit counter productive as while it's sending the bow out, it's also pushing the stern back in.

You would be better off if, in the example you used, you put the helm hard to port and using both forward and astern gears, kicked the stern alone out into clear water, (do all this keeping the helm over to port). When the stern is in clear water, keep going astern pulling the whole boat into the stream. When all into clear water, into forward gear, helm to starboard, and Bob's your uncle. 

Thanks MM, I guess using the bow thruster is not a universal panacea. I will try without. 

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i find myself in agreement with Maurice Mynah, steer towards the bank (i too would run a bow line to a post, or wedge the nose into a corner (Horsey mill dyke)), forward to kick the stern out, then reverse out into the river and forward again to straighten up, even if it means getting the stern at right angles to the bank before reversing straight into the wind. it can be difficult without the bow rope to stop the boat skittering along the quay heading, I am fortunate that the boats I tend to choose are easier to control a bow rope single handed. but half the art is in preparation before you unmoor and knowing what you plan to do to achieve the result you want.

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18 hours ago, TheQ said:

Use a long line to the bank , then back to the boat.

Drive forward against the bank and the mooring rope, , when the stern of the boat is out far enough release the bow line and the person on the bow can pull the line back in while you're reversing.

Alternatively the tide is often stronger than the wind, release the end pointing into the tide, the boat should swing out, then release the other end and motor off in forward or reverse as required..

Thanks TheQ, unfortunately Tisca's configuration doesn't allow the bow line to come into the equation, but letting the tide do more of the work is something I will try. Thanks.

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18 hours ago, MauriceMynah said:

Looking at the boat database, I see your craft is a sports style boat. Is she engined for performance or gentle broads use? If she's engined for pootling, some extra ballast might help her to be less skittish in a breeze.

She's definitely a sheep in wolf's clothing MM so a few kilos of ballast might stop her dancing in the breeze. Thanks.

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