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Hockham Admiral

Diesel Bug

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Just read a long article on diesel bug contamination.

The sulphur content which gave red diesel natural biocidal action was dramatically reduced and the allowable amount of biodiesel increased from 5% to 7%. Biodiesel contains water which is a more attractive environment for the bug to grow.....

Do we need to buy additives to tame or eliminate the bug?

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That's an interesting article. 12 products were tested and they gave good, but differing, comments about 8 of them. So which to choose?

FWIW, I've been using Soltron for several years, first for a BMC 1.5D and now in my GM 1.6D.

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If you look at the last page of the report there is a paragraph about another problem with Fame mixed diesel, old diesel would work at temperatures as low as -7 degrees to -14 degrees, the Fame mix can have problems from +1 degree.

Soltron and Star tron are both kerosene based and improve the cold start properties of diesel.

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I wonder what the emisions are like after we throw in a load off additives, to counter bactiria, add necessary lurication and aid starting? I bet that by the time we spend a fortune on additives to put right the already overly expencive fuel that the viehicle still still sends a few chuggs of black smoke out the back!

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John I honestly think with the amount of motoring around you do you wont see a problem as you cycle your fuel pretty quickly! There is alot of speculation around as to what the long term effects are, but generally 'diesel bug' only seems to effect those who leave it in the tanks for long periods, especially those periods where condensation would aid the growth such as late autumn/early spring.

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You could try to buy FAME free where possible John it is available at some riverside pumps, Marine 16 is as good a biocide treatment as any as is Grotmar (despite the name), it is odd that some people seem to go through life without ever getting a sniff of it whilst others seem to get recurring instances. Soltron is sworn by among many of it's users but it is best used as a preventitive as being an enzyme treatment rather than a biocide it will not easily deal with the bug as well or as quickly as a biocide if it is already present to the extent it bcomes noticable on your primary filters.

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I have read many posts on here regarding the dreaded Diesel Bug. We offer a product that is not an additive, it is a system for removing the bug after it leaves the tank but before it clogs the filters or damages the fuel pump or injectors. For more details please contact me on the following e-mail. Thanks.

alistair@mlsystem.co.uk

Best Regards.

Alistair Ford.

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Personally I have never had problems with the bug on Brigid Mary. I have put some rubbish in the tanks in the past few years, varying in colour from crisp clear red to dull purple through to opaque black and occasional green! I have never put an additive in as I think they are far too expensive and there are far too many brands each telling us why we shold use X brand or Y brand. I think the secret lies in a good seperator, I mean somthing like a Separ or Racor. I have a fuel polisher which I use now and again so that may make a difference, beats paying a fortune for the additives though! Dont forget, the but grows in water at the boundary of the fuel, not the fuel itself, get rid of the water,get rid of the bug.

I would never think of using Bio Diesel, dont want to smell like a chip shop and I believe Bio damages engines. Having said all of the above, My engine is an old plodder of 70's vintage and I am sure would run just as well on old sump oil as white fuel oil from the fore court!

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I have read many posts on here regarding the dreaded Diesel Bug. We offer a product that is not an additive, it is a system for removing the bug after it leaves the tank but before it clogs the filters or damages the fuel pump or injectors. For more details please contact me on the following e-mail. Thanks.alistair@mlsystem.co.uk Best Regards.Alistair Ford.

How much for the MFP2, Alistair, please?

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I have read many posts on here regarding the dreaded Diesel Bug. We offer a product that is not an additive, it is a system for removing the bug after it leaves the tank but before it clogs the filters or damages the fuel pump or injectors. For more details please contact me on the following e-mail. Thanks.

alistair@mlsystem.co.uk

Best Regards.

Alistair Ford.

So does a decent Racor primary with a cerntrifuge, at a lot less money, there are tried, tested and methods available at far less cost, and they are proven.

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If you look at the site John you will see what I mean, Its just a centrifuge filter like the Racors we've all been using for years, even then with good filtration one has to kill the buggers or you will keep having to change the filters no matter how good, a combination of biocide, a decent filter changing regime with a primary Racor (other primary filters are available) water seperator with or without centrifuge should see one safe. The one thing I like about Soltron, Startron et al is that if their claim is true, and many real world users do agree that they are then the bugs are digested and pass through the filter harmlesley, unlike a biocide which though unlike Soltreon will rapidly eradicate any already present infestation the bodies still block filters until they are all removed, ether over time and filter changes or by having the fuel "polished"

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I have started adding Marine 16 Diesel Bug Treatment each time I add fuel

to the tank. Typically around 70ltrs.

A 100ml bottle will treat 1000lts of diesel and costs around £8. As yet, I have

seen no evidence of the bug in the system even before I started adding the

treatment but thought it better to be safe than sorry. At £8, that will last me

for the season or there-abouts and seems like value for money to me.

Available from French Marine at Rackheath Ind Estate.

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Hi,

Racor filters are just that filters!! you still have to change the filters and introduce biocide to every litre. Our Fuel Purifiers do not have any filters they will keep cleaning the fuel from bug continuously for the life of the engine with no additional cost once fitted. As you will be aware Diesel bug is always in the fuel it is just dormant until it gets the right conditions to replicate. If you invest a little today you will have years of trouble free sailing and now the EU directive is making Marine supply ultra low Sulphur Diesel this is going to make the problem much worse. Best Regards. Alistair.

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How is sulphur reduction going to increase the risk? If you mean the addition of FAME to red then I could agree, but that is easily countered by refusing to buy from suppliers unless FAME free, they soon get the message and unlike road fuel, FAME free red is freely available from refineries.

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One of the supposed problems with the new fuel is that it thickens at higher temperatures than the old diesel, I've just found this article on kerosene which suggests that using it as a additive can prevent this. (does anyone know more)

I buy kerosene at 55p a litre :grin:

The future of kerosene depends on the discovery of new applications as well as the development of new methods of production. New uses include increasing military demand for high grade kerosene to replace much of its diesel fuel with JP-8, which is a kerosene based jet fuel. The diesel fuel industry is also exploring a new process that involves adding kerosene to low sulfur diesel fuel to prevent it from gelling in cold weather. Commercial aviation may benefit by reducing the risk of jet fuel explosion by creating a new low-misting kerosene. In the residential sector, new and improved kerosene heaters that provide better protection from fire are anticipated to increase demand.

As demand for kerosene and its byproducts increases, new methods of refining and extracting kerosene will become even more important. One new method, developed by ExxonMobil, is a low-cost way to extract high purity normal paraffin from kerosene. This process uses ammonia that very efficiently absorbs the contaminants. This method uses vapor phase fixed-bed adsorption technology and yields a high level of paraffin that are greater than 90% pure.

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The new red diesel is exactly the same as the old in every respect apart from a lower sulphur content, unless that is you allow people to talk you into buying red with FAME. The solution is simple do not buy red diesel with FAME added, as I have said people will soon get the message if they are left with it on their hands, OK so its maybe 1p a litre more. If people are evasive or refuse to put FAME free on the invoice then come to your own conclusion.

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