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Timbo

Chairman
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Timbo last won the day on November 25

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About Timbo

  • Rank
    Full Member
  • Birthday 01/01/1966

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Lincolnshire
  • Interests
    History, Archaeology, language, wooden boats, woodwork, fishing, filmmaking. photography in no particular order.

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  1. It's twenty days, I think, to my 54th birthday. For the past few years I've received brochures for 'holidays for the over fifties' on the run up to Christmas and my birthday. This year I've only been sent funeral plan brochures!
  2. The earliest joke in Griff's joke book is Grade II Listed and reads something like this. Et nobiliori , quaerit: "Servus tuus et mater erat in domo mea?" "Non, pater meus esse hortulanum," respondit autem duplex. Translation: A noble on seeing his double asks "was your mother a slave in my house?". "No my father was the gardener!" replied the double.
  3. Congratulations, keep up the good work and...brace yourself! PM winging it's way to you!
  4. Timbo

    My Day

    Sorry to hear about Macie, Griff. She certainly put the beagle brothers in their place at last years wooden boat show. Thoughts are with you, shout if you need owt! Tim
  5. Members unlucky enough to have to ring me up will know that I tend to answer the phone claiming to be a number of institutions and organisations from 'Gainsborough Morgue, you stab 'em we slab 'em' to 'Bentley Pit Bottom' or even 'Lady Ethel's Home for Fallen Women and Pantomime Dames'. If I don't recognise the number when the phone is ringing I will still pick up the call but my greeting is usually 'Thames Valley Fraud'. Quite a few unknown callers put the phone down at that point. Calls that come through that start with a moments silence before the accident claim lawyer call centre operator comes onto the line are in for some fun. "According to our records you were the victim of an accident!" "I knew it!" "Was a vehicle involved in the accident sir?" "Several, shall I tell you what happened?" "Could you answer a few questions first sir?" "of course." If I get an eager one on the line I've even managed to describe the opening sequence of a random Bond Film before I get to tell them I'm Daniel Craig's stunt double. "So your name's not really Bret Storm? You're wasting my time sir!" "You rang me!" As far as shopping on line goes, I've never had many problems. I always use PayPal where I can, I check each transaction form thoroughly just like I would do with any contract. I also double check the company I'm purchasing from through either eBay or Amazon. I've had some right bargains too. My table saw should have been £900 and I snapped it up at £300 brand new full warranty. Don't ever, ever buy makeup or perfume online. Nine times out of ten it is fake or old stock. Although perfumes don't have a sell by date on them they do have a date or batch number that corresponds to a date at which point in time the fragrance will have oxidized and will no longer smell as the perfumer intended it to smell. Just before this date, unsold fragrance is withdrawn from the shop shelves and sold on to the online discounters. eBay customers watch out next year as the PayPal contract with eBay ends and a Dutch company will be taking over the payment transactions. You will still be able to pay using PayPal, but PayPal will no longer be the default setting, you will have to hunt for the PayPal option to get the added security it provides.
  6. Timbo

    Tolls 2020

    Ah, you see...don't admit to enjoying your job! That's like asking for a wage cut!
  7. My experience of excavating in Egypt...I'd be more impressed if he couldn't locate a tomb in a pyramid! I'm way past sceptic and into full contagion. I don't do flat earth, unicorns or big estuaries!
  8. Dowsing? Divining? Ley Lines? Guaranteed to get a rise out of an archaeologist, often quicker than Tropical Linda. These days most archaeology done is 'rescue archaeology' getting as much information we can before the archaeology is destroyed by climate, developers, conservationists and the local amateur archaeology group dis-ably assisted by Ted the local dowser and his coat hangers of doom who happened to notice that you can draw a line on a map connecting Yare House, Wussername's Wall at Reedham. JM's slipway and Tkalčićeva Street in Zagreb. Mind you, thinking about it, I reckon we should apply to get Wussername Grade II Listed!
  9. Granddaughter Grace put her Christmas tree up at home over the weekend. Meanwhile Santa's little helper is looking for his Black n Decker to assemble her presents and thinking he might have left it on the boat!
  10. If the other feller is the 'good' doctor does that mean I'm the 'bad' one?
  11. Anyone looking at the Broads Authority site would be incorrectly told the Broads was once a vast estuary in the Roman period. With what information is readily available over the internet subject to an easily manipulated search algorithm rather than the accuracy of the information being presented, I quite like checking out the information in the location I find myself. Although some of that information can be suspect too. I was having a bit of a chuckle Peter about where we would put your blue plaque on the rhonde or Yare House? A bit like the plaque to Nelson in 'Carry on Jack' which Kenneth Williams' Captain Fearless keeps tripping over? I saw a moorhen on Barton Broad last month. It wasn't until I saw it that I realised I hadn't seen one in years! Meanwhile back at home and talking of 'blue plaques' I've run across a case of blue plaque fitters who got lost. A local history group in town raise money to pay for blue plaques celebrating various historical figures involvement in the town or notable bits of architecture or architecture long gone. The only problem is, they either don't put them anywhere near the place they are supposed to commemorate or when they do get it right put the plaque so high up a wall that you can't read it.
  12. I've been hunting my book shelves and discovered where I put the book I was going to recommend. Here is the current definitive read and set text on the geology and archaeology of ancient Broadland. "Ol’Man River. Geo-Archaeological Aspects of Rivers and River Plains by Morgan De Dapper, Frank Vermeulen, Sarah Deprez and Devi Taelman of the University of Ghent. It is a tad expensive though!
  13. He was also the chap that realised how contrived was the evidence of the Great Estuary theory and kickstarted much of the modern research done by the archaeologists and geologists from Cambridge and Birmingham universities north and south of the Broads respectively.
  14. I'm not talking about them falling over...you know who I'm looking at over my glasses ... I've just spent an afternoon at my day job advising a landscape management authority on the content on their tourist information boards. The authority involved had received quite a lot of negative comment from visitors and stakeholders about the information contained on these notices. The main complaint can be characterised in one comment. "I wanted to know about the history of the location but the only information available was about non-descript brown birds which we could not see." This instantly struck a chord with me. I recently brought RT back to the Northern Broads and moored up for the night at the Tea Gardens. "I wonder why they are called the Tea Gardens?" asked Alli who had been volunteered as crew. "I don't know. There's a tourist information board over there, let's go find out!" I replied. We sauntered over to find a a board full of information about non-descript brown birds which were hiding and not visible at the location at that time of year at that time of day and nothing about the history of the location. As part of the meeting today I was confronted with a blinkered wildlife organisation also attending the meeting while we were on a site visit. "There's no history here, the wildlife is the important thing that we need to get visitors to appreciate!" said the wildlife bod. While we walked along the path we were caught up by a group of American Tourists. As we walked along I picked up shards of Roman pottery, a whet stone, several neolithic pot boilers and an Elizabethan silver penny from the plough soil by the headland. The tourists were fascinated and asked so many questions I went into 'tour guide mode'. I pointed out the remains of the abandoned medieval village. We spoke about the plague, agricultural revolution, I gave them directions to the next village along which was the former home of one of the Pilgrim Father's which was one of the reasons they were visiting the area. The tourists moved on leaving me £60 in tips which I donated to the management authority as my contribution to their new 'inclusive' tourist information boards. The rambling point I'm getting to, is that the information boards around the Broads are in a similar state. Other than at specific recognised historic locations such as St Bennets or Potter Bridge, there is little or no information included on signage for the tourist interested in things other than non descript brown birds. Norfolk is a landscape shaped by man. It's a landscape so drenched in history you couldn't swing a duck, if you can find one, without hitting archaeology. So please, could we start to have signage which is inclusive of all interests? Rant over, I'm now off to report my finds to the county archaeologist and finish this article on 18th Century perfumers.
  15. There are several books that I'm waiting in fevered anticipation to be published or in fact written. These include: An Idiots Guide to the History and Hostelries of the Norfolk Broads by M Mynah Off the Wall and the follow up Ponderer on the Palisade by A Wussername Great Heart the History of Hearts Cruises by Vaughan Let Them Eat Cake by D Brundall Navy A guide to the baked goods of the Norfolk Broads. Ow much? A history of Yorkshiremen in Norfolk by B Ambition. Morning Mardle A collection of short stories set in the Norfolk Broads by A Wussername and V. Ashby Course it'll fit! The memoirs of Ex-Pilot. There are a few others...
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