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Timbo

Wanted: Tardis

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Indeed yes, Ben Gunn is my prospective Father in Law. Although Ellie and I visit her parents every week and Ellie rings them every other night, Ben Gunn and I have conducted an almost daily correspondence for some ten years via email. Subjects range from serious theology and archaeology to politics and thingsaintwottheyusedtobeology. However, the majority of our scribblings regard the days' news headlines, things we have been building in our respective workshops and my progress, or lack of, with Royal Tudor.

Most of the family are quite bemused at our friendship through email, Ellie is convinced that we write in code so no one can understand what we are talking about. What's actually happening is that we both seem to occupy a kind of reality where a certain Anthony Aloysius St John Hancock actually lived at 23 Railway Cuttings in East Cheam, he still does and occasionally pops round for tea and crumpets. The Men From The Ministry, of course, is a daily fly on the wall documentary of activities in Westminster and Whitehall and the Goon Show is breath of normality.

Of course, we don't live in the past you know...Count Arthur Strong is the kind of groovy up t the minute quick fire comedy we are into! Our missives are signed BG and NSG him being Ben Gunn and I Neddy Seagoon.

 

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Next question...

I've salvaged my old workbench. It fell apart a bit due to some crappy mortice and tenon joints (it was always wonky anyway) and I've set about cutting it down to the right size for the shed and rebuilt it with some additional timber for strength.

The old top was some tongue and groove, which was rubbish for working on and had warped so I'm thinking plywood for the new top unless anyone has a better suggestion? I've been told an old door is a good option but I've not found a cheap, flat, solid wood one on eBay or Gumtree and 8x4 ply seems cheap.

18mm is thicker than I had before, so ought to do the job I reckon?

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in my old shed I used 1" planks to make the worktop, but then I had a sheet of galvanised steel on top, with a roll up at the back and a roll down at the front (just as it came).

I used to make my re-enactment swords in there - hand carved with a 10" grinder, by the time I stopped it had nearly 1/4" thickness of grinding dust on the walls and window.

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1 hour ago, Jonzo said:

Next question...

I've salvaged my old workbench. It fell apart a bit due to some crappy mortice and tenon joints (it was always wonky anyway) and I've set about cutting it down to the right size for the shed and rebuilt it with some additional timber for strength.

The old top was some tongue and groove, which was rubbish for working on and had warped so I'm thinking plywood for the new top unless anyone has a better suggestion? I've been told an old door is a good option but I've not found a cheap, flat, solid wood one on eBay or Gumtree and 8x4 ply seems cheap.

18mm is thicker than I had before, so ought to do the job I reckon?

On my first work bench, I used 18mm ply. All seemed well to begin with until I got the inevitable nick and bit where I had sawn, cut, sanded and chopped through the surface. I was quite shocked at how quickly the whole thing delaminated, and it was good quality marine ply. I was soon getting some severe splinters in my hands just from looking at the bench.

My current woodwork bench top is made out of 22mm thick boards. I just screwed these onto the bench frame, but I should have glued them together to make a solid top as there is some 'give' in each plank and some things go out of square if I'm not careful.

Once RT is in the water I think I might build myself a good solid workbench out of pine 2x4's, laminate them together in three's and pop them through my planer to make sure they are flat before laminating the lot together.

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you can, but looking at that one it will just be the same , they are easy to make with just a piece of 1/2" ply and a couple of 2 x1 strips, the trick is getting everything perfectly square.

they are also known as bench hooks.

edited to add - actually no, I was wrong, flipped over gives the other hand.

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8 hours ago, Timbo said:

My current woodwork bench top is made out of 22mm thick boards. I just screwed these onto the bench frame, but I should have glued them together to make a solid top as there is some 'give' in each plank and some things go out of square if I'm not careful.

Once RT is in the water I think I might build myself a good solid workbench out of pine 2x4's, laminate them together in three's and pop them through my planer to make sure they are flat before laminating the lot together.

I did wonder about using 22mm planks - mainly because they'll go in the car whereas an 8x4 sheet of ply definitely won't.

Laminating is way beyond my level of non-expertise, though, so I'd have to stick with something I can do with a chop saw, circular saw, glue and screws!

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1 hour ago, grendel said:

Tim, that is why you should use a sawing board on your work bench when sawing, 

bench+hook.jpg

Though to my mind this has the notch in the wrong end for normal right hand sawing.

Another reason for getting a clip round the ear at school for not using one, Mid you they weren't in that good condition...

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1 hour ago, grendel said:

you can, but looking at that one it will just be the same , they are easy to make with just a piece of 1/2" ply and a couple of 2 x1 strips, the trick is getting everything perfectly square.

they are also known as bench hooks.

edited to add - actually no, I was wrong, flipped over gives the other hand.

I made a couple of bench hooks G but I have trouble, being effectively one handed. I do use mini bench hooks as saw guides clamped to the work and then I clamp the whole lot to my bench. 

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1 hour ago, Jonzo said:

I did wonder about using 22mm planks - mainly because they'll go in the car whereas an 8x4 sheet of ply definitely won't.

Laminating is way beyond my level of non-expertise, though, so I'd have to stick with something I can do with a chop saw, circular saw, glue and screws!

Hi John,

You can purchase laminated boards up to around 40 mm thick, 600 mm wide.

I have used these for making carcasses for built in wardrobes.

Regards

Alan

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2 hours ago, Jonzo said:

I did wonder about using 22mm planks - mainly because they'll go in the car whereas an 8x4 sheet of ply definitely won't.

Laminating is way beyond my level of non-expertise, though, so I'd have to stick with something I can do with a chop saw, circular saw, glue and screws!

What you need is some clamps Jonzo....lots and lots of lovely clamps. Lots and lots and...erm...oh yes LOTS of clamps. If you see a clamp...buy it! Then with the tools you mentioned you can laminate your own tops. Go for timber that is PAR or planed all round. One of the many good tips Doug gave me was if you are buying from the likes of B&Q hunt through the stacks of timber and sort out the straight ones...there won't be very many. Alternatively, go to a lumber yard, there are loads in your area, that will cut and plane your boards to size...they are cheaper too.

As soon as you get the timber home, put the timber on a flat surface (the floor) spread glue down the edges of your timber (Titebond II PVA) and clamp them together. Clamp tight enough to hold them but not over tight you put a warp in them. Alternate the clamps side to side as well as top and bottom to even the pressure. I put cauls or strips of timber in between the clamps and the project. You can use greaseproof paper to stop the project sticking to the cauls.

When everything is clamped up have a bucket of water and a cloth handy and wipe off the excess glue...we like squeeze out but it needs cleaning up. Leave the clamped up timber overnight. Take off the clamps and trim the end using your circular saw.

Here's a Youtube video of one of the woodworkers I follow. The lad is just a beginner...or was, using woodwork as a means of rehab I think. He's a bit on the boring side but I like the way he get's around problems with a minimum of tools. His latest project is making a bench...definitely overkill in construction, but the 'processes' are the same.

 

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37 minutes ago, Timbo said:

As soon as you get the timber home, put the timber on a flat surface (the floor) spread glue down the edges of your timber (Titebond II PVA) and clamp them together.

The following morning stare in awe and wonder at how you've glued your new laminate to the floorboards. That will be the strongest glued joint you'll ever make.

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