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johnash

Through Potter Heigham?

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I might be mistaken but I believe the posts on the Lower Bure have been numbered as long as I can remember and thats a long long time. I also believe that there are other reasons why there is a "hump" in the Bure - and thats nothing new either but not entering into that discussion!!! The saltwater surges are still getting further upstream every year, despite arguments over the "hump" and everytime you get a big one, one, more fish die! The Broads are generally full of freshwater fish so they dislike saltwater for too long and surges will kill them. Not sure too many fisherman, or indeed many others either, want to see thousands of dead fish rotting in the rivers!!

The recent floods on the Don were sad but dredging per se is rarely the answer - frequently it just moves the problem elsewhere!

But going back to the bridge - its not the air draft especially that stops transit but almost all Broads cruisers these day are built to the maximum allowable beam and because the arch width is narrower than at Wroxham, it is the beam that causes the main obstacle. So try and pick a 10' beam rather than the more standard 12' - that will help but they are few and far between.

Or hire a day boat as suggested

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47 minutes ago, marshman said:

I might be mistaken but I believe the posts on the Lower Bure have been numbered as long as I can remember and thats a long long time. I also believe that there are other reasons why there is a "hump" in the Bure - and thats nothing new either but not entering into that discussion!!! The saltwater surges are still getting further upstream every year, despite arguments over the "hump" and everytime you get a big one, one, more fish die! The Broads are generally full of freshwater fish so they dislike saltwater for too long and surges will kill them. Not sure too many fisherman, or indeed many others either, want to see thousands of dead fish rotting in the rivers!!

The recent floods on the Don were sad but dredging per se is rarely the answer - frequently it just moves the problem elsewhere!

But going back to the bridge - its not the air draft especially that stops transit but almost all Broads cruisers these day are built to the maximum allowable beam and because the arch width is narrower than at Wroxham, it is the beam that causes the main obstacle. So try and pick a 10' beam rather than the more standard 12' - that will help but they are few and far between.

Or hire a day boat as suggested

Very sound thinking .

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Our 'B.A' has a 12ft beam with an absolute minimum clearance of 6ft 5" at PHB required for safe passage.

I've taken her through at that height before now and it gives me a full inch of error room.

'B.A' was designed / launched in 66, back then through to the eighties she would have been regularly taken through PHB by the pilots as and when her hirers wanted.

Nowadays it is a rare occurrence.

'B.A' has not got any bigger

Griff

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2 hours ago, BroadAmbition said:

B.A' has not got any bigger

Ah, but have the crew? :default_norty:

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Ah, but have the crew? 

Fair point - Well made. :default_icon_clap:

A =  Probably - Yes!  :default_arms:  But that would lower the airdraft and assist passage - Sadly it ain't helping :default_sad:

Griff

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The 40 and 45 ft Connoisseurs from Woods have a better chance then most modern large craft; again the width of the cabin top being more of a problem than the air draught.

I've always wondered if the original Caribbeans would get through; I've no idea of their air draught but they did have very wide side decks so cabin top width may not have been as much of a problem.

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I certainly got stuck on the wrong side in a hire boat in the 1970s & the yard came with a load of weights plus about 6 people who had been watching & only just scraped through though the pilot had only taken us up the day before. I don't remember which craft or if it was high rainfall overnight or what was the cause - there were about 3 others being helped back.

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6 minutes ago, webntweb said:

The 40 and 45 ft Connoisseurs from Woods have a better chance then most modern large craft; again the width of the cabin top being more of a problem than the air draught.

I've always wondered if the original Caribbeans would get through; I've no idea of their air draught but they did have very wide side decks so cabin top width may not have been as much of a problem.

The later Buccaneer range had narrower decks, but a substantial cut away from cabin sides to coachroof.  Lightning has exactly the same and was designed to go through the blockage, and she was built in the 90s. Sadly now it will hardly ever get under. But even if she could, our syndicate rules and insurance does`nt allow it.

YOU`RE ONLY SUPPOSED TO BLOW THE BLOODY BRIDGE UP. Taken from that great film "The Italian Job", though very slightly modified. :default_gbxhmm: :default_laugh:

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2 hours ago, SPEEDTRIPLE said:

our syndicate rules and insurance does`nt allow it.

That's understandable. What are the rules for Wroxham Bridge? 

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We too got stuck the other side of the bridge, had to wait two days before any attempt to get us through. Lots of people on board to get us through. Would never risk it again, this was in 2000. Again in a Connisier cruisers boat.

I certainly got stuck on the wrong side in a hire boat in the 1970s & the yard came with a load of weights plus about 6 people who had been watching & only just scraped through though the pilot had only taken us up the day before. I don't remember which craft or if it was high rainfall overnight or what was the cause - there were about 3 others being helped back.


Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

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The later Buccaneer range had narrower decks, but a substantial cut away from cabin sides to coachroof.  Lightning has exactly the same and was designed to go through the blockage, and she was built in the 90s. Sadly now it will hardly ever get under. But even if she could, our syndicate rules and insurance does`nt allow it.
YOU`RE ONLY SUPPOSED TO BLOW THE BLOODY BRIDGE UP. Taken from that great film "The Italian Job", though very slightly modified. :default_gbxhmm: :default_laugh:


Out of interest how does your insurance policy stop you passing under Potter Heigham Bridge?


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Hi Matt, 

To be honest I don't know, all I can think of is that it was a voluntary restriction on cruising ground due the the risk of possible damage which was agree'd on earlier in the syndicate before I bought into it. 

Now you come to question it, i'l ask our chairman and find out, it might make insurance a bit cheaper?. 

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6 hours ago, Matt said:

 


Out of interest how does your insurance policy stop you passing under Potter Heigham Bridge?


Sent from my iPhone using Norfolk Broads Network

 

Hi Matt, and all,

I`ve just received an e-mail from our chairman. Lightnings restriction re Potter Heigham bridge is purely voluntary amongst the owners, but has no baring on insurance. Basically, we CAN take Lightning through, but if anything happens, or Lightning gets stranded through tidal restrictions, the owner who took her through (or attempted to) is solely responsible.  I suppose with this in mind, the owners of the day (before my share ownership) decided on a voluntary no go through Potter Heigham Bridge, a move i would also support.

Unless they raise it, or blow it up of course :default_gbxhmm: :default_laugh:

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