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Out of curiosity what is the boat next to Grebe in the shed?  Amazing work you are doing!

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4 hours ago, w-album said:

Out of curiosity what is the boat next to Grebe in the shed?  Amazing work you are doing!

Liz, that is a Martham Janet class. Slowly being rebuilt, more or less from the hog up. I exaggerate a little, but not all that much!

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2 minutes ago, Spider said:

Liz, that is a Martham Janet class. Slowly being rebuilt, more or less from the hog up. I exaggerate a little, but not all that much!

Thanks, a hard challenge me thinks :)

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It was John Lennon who said: " Life is what happens when you are busy making other plans." Indeed, life has moved on and I have not posted much about the restoration of Broadland Grebe. A busy couple of weeks has seen considerable progress made on the boat, but we missed our original launch date and are still in the shed. This proved somewhat frustrating for Ricardo and myself, but it was due to circumstances well beyond our control. 

Both decks have now been fitted and so have both cabin sides which are ready for the mammoth task of varnishing. 

After manufacturing the sliding roof sides they were fixed to the roof which will be glazed by the boatyard next week. Exact and careful measurements had to be taken to ensure the sides would fit against the screen, this was no easy task as we also had to be certain the roof would sit and slide on the runners (see pictures). It was at this point that the expertise, skill and experience of Ricardo came to the fore. Having done this sort of things on a previous job, I could be certain that the job was in safe hands. Although I do admit to being a little nervous when we lifted the sides up to measure them against the screen for the first time. 

The varnishing of the roof sides almost complete, the metal struts were carefully measured, checked and fitted with spacers (see pictures). Again, this involved exact measurement and careful fitting. There is little room for error if everything is going to fit, and more importantly work correctly. 

Once the decks and roof are glassed, which should be taking place as I write, the remains the massive task of painting and varnishing. 

This is a short up-date but I will have more to add when I return in a week or so after the next work period . I hope that I will be able to report that we are in the water and conducted a river test. 

Aft cabin wood replaced.JPG

sliding roof support strut fitted and clamped.JPG

FIRST COAT OF VARNISH CABIN SIDES.JPG

sliding roof sides clamped and ready for glass.JPG

Runners made up.JPG

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At last I have got around to posting an up-date following ten days working on BG. 

As with most re-fits we are behind schedule which is somewhat annoying, but nothing can be done about it as we are in "dockyard hands" for some aspects of the work. I was delighted to see that when I arrived at Somerleyton, the decks had been glassed and were ready to paint, it also meant that the toe rails and rubbers could be replaced and the sides painted as planned. 

Due to the light evenings I planned to work from dawn until dusk, cooking on a "Tommy cooker" and sleeping in my car in the boatyard. In other words field conditions. After all it would only be for 10 days and the Duke's Head is as the top of the lane. I worked out a rough work programme with the aim of completing a set number of tasks each day. 

I began with a light sand of all painted surfaces with the addition of some filler and a further sand before a final undercoat was applied. The decks had been glassed over and were lightly sanded before painting with a single pack deck paint. Toe rails and rubbers were replaced and plugged (easier said than done). The transom was lightly sanded and varnished, it will be stripped next winter when BG returns to the shed for essential defect rectification and the ongoing planned work. 

The sliding roof was glassed, filled and sanded back ready for painting. (see pictures). A further two coats of deck paint were applied in between lightly sanding and varnishing the toe rails and rubbers. 

Usually, I don't mind anti-fouling too much but the boat is close to the ground which makes it difficult to do. However, once completed I had a sense of satisfaction that deserved at least two pints of Ghost Ship. 

The blue and white gloss was applied and the toe rails given another coat of varnish. Numbers, vents and corner fenders were screwed on and BG was starting to take shape. 

Toward the end of my time, I was joined by my good friend Ricardo who was fitting an engine to one of the yachts (a man of many talents). 

Next winter we are back in the shed. There is a rotten frame in the front cabin which needs to be replaced. We are also tackling the interior of the boat and adding such things as a decent music system, new water system, and up-grading the soft furnishings. The interior will be completely stripped and re-varnished before replacing the flooring. But that, as they say, will be another story for another day.

All that remains now is for the windows to be fitted by the boatyard and BG will be moved outside for the fitting of the sliding roof. I am assured that BG will be in the water at beginning of July - this remains to be seen! 

We are intending to come to the NBN meeting and the wooden boat show this year for quick visits. We are also intend to venture over to the Northern Rivers at some point. 

anti foul on.JPG

aft cabin with new deck glassed.JPG

aft deck painted.JPG

new deck painted stbd.JPG

sliding roof glassed.JPG

sliding roof glassed and sanded.JPG

painted and almost ready.JPG

gloss and waterline painted.JPG

rubbers on.JPG

fenders on.JPG

sliding roof undercoat.JPG

shed evening.JPG

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Wow,  that is a labour of love.

Is your biggest joy restoring the boat or being afloat. ?

On a project like this do you always have bits to cut out and repair or when finished do you have a few years just to enjoy her before it all starts again.?

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I called in to see progress when I was afloat in May. Sorry I missed you. That is some beautiful work, you must be very pleased with what you (and friends) have achieved so far. Big respect for taking this on!

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We have a rough 5 year plan from when we purchased BG, and worked out what needed to be done each year. It is very fortunate that we have an excellent boatyard where Ripplecraft boats were originally built and hired from. We also have a good friend who is highly knowledgeable, experienced and skilled. Whilst we can do some of the work ourselves, we are not skilled enough to make cabin sides and decks. Whilst there are some people who would attempt a DIY, we have seen far too many bodge jobs and expensive mistakes. We know our limits! 

As for what we like best, my wife and I often have this conversation and have decided that it is a close thing. The advantage of a working restoration is that the winter is still boat time. I enjoy working in the shed with kindred spirits who engage in considerable banter. Our main concern (apart from the ever critical experts) is being hit by another boat - this happened last year hen we were hit by a hire boat. The hirer then said: "Don't know what your problem is, it is only an old boat." Seriously, we love being afloat and there is nothing (in our opinion) quite like being afloat in a vintage Broads cruiser. 

 

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The bit about being hit by another boat never really leaves you .i found myself (and still do )becoming very particular as to where i tie up and avoid the northern honey pots like the plague  in the height of .........that said of course anything can happen . the old girl is looking very good and is a credit to you and personally ( apart from the nightly pub visit ) i enjoyed fettling more than the sailing part but each to their own 

finny

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1 hour ago, VetChugger said:

That is simply magnificent. Very well done.

Almost as good as Post office road.

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Seriously though Socrates, you & Ricardo are doing a great job on BG. The work your doing to restore the old woodie is top class craftsmanship, well done & keep up the thread I love it.

paul

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Watching your progress with Broadland Grebe has made my heart pump faster and harder.  I have so much admiration for your courage and determination to do the job properly.  These beautiful old woodies deserve to be restored.  Grebe is obviously in safe hands.

Broadland Swift has been out of the water for the past twelve months having her stern bottom replaced in glued and nailed strip iroko - as originally built.  The hull had rotted from the inside (rainwater via the stern companionway).  The hope is that, as soon as the new stainless stern gear is ready to be fitted, she will be relaunched soon and then converted to electric propulsion.  The tonne and a half Lister Freedom 4 and Blackstone gearbox have been removed - the silencer alone was heavier than I could carry comfortably!

You know that, when you next come up North, you're welcome  to moor above the bridge at Potter.  I shall drool all over handiwork!  

Very, very well done.

IMG_2297.jpg

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Good to see the progress being made with Broadland Swift, we had a look at her when she was out the water and noticed the rot in the stern. We had the same problem and were told it  was always an issue with Ripplecraft when they were in the hire fleet. Replacing those planks was a nightmare job to say the least, this is because of the way they are designed and how they are fixed to the frames forward of the bulkhead and keel. The best thing to do is to make sure that the new planks are well treated (see previous posts), cleaned and painted every year. We also ensure that the rear of the boat is kept free of any accumulation of junk in order to allow the air to circulate around the area. Whilst it may reduce the amount of stowage space, it helps prevent the area becoming a breeding ground of damp. Likewise, regular sweeping of the accumulated  detritus helps. The previous owners of Grebe neglected this area, so it also rotted from the inside. 

I agree with replacing the old Lister, it was almost impossible to get parts and if you could find them they were unbelievably expensive. I know the purists would object to us removing the lump of 1930's English metal, but it is just not practical on so many levels. Not least of these is the cumbersome gear change system which can be dangerous in the crowded waters of the Broads. For those who do not know - to go astern you had to completely stop the engine, then use a huge gear leaver (it was actually from a World War Two Tank) to put the boat in reverse, then go back to the throttle which you pushed forward to the desired astern revs. Just about everyone on the boat would end up with untold bruises from the huge gear leaver. 

We are certainly planning to come to Potter again this summer and will call in and see Expilot. 

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 BG is afloat at last. Received the call this morning that there was no sinking over night, and the window person will be fitting the new windows in the sliding roof tomorrow. However, the actual glass for the said windows has not yet arrived. Apparently there was a delay of some sort caused by something or other, none of which really made sense to Madam Captain who took the call on her way to attend to her flock. I doubt if it would have made sense to me either. We are packed and ready to head off early doors which is almost as exciting as this momentous event coinciding with a certain football match. 

On arrival at Somerleyton, it will be hands to cleaning stations while the stoker de-winterizes and fresh waters ship. Little doubt there will be the usual gurgles and burping sounds from the somewhat antiquated and complex water system. Never mind, this is being replaced next year as it has serve the boat well for 60 years. Heaven knows what is at the bottom of our fresh water tanks, I am sure all will be revealed in the restoration reports next year. 

If all goes to plan we will have a short shakedown cruise on Sunday or Monday, this will depend on how well the planks have taken up, and if any defect rectification is required.  We are reluctant to head across Breydon Water because it is the start of the silly season, we will more than likely stay on the south side until September.  We intend to come  to the meeting in August and put in an appearance at the wooden boat weekend. The latter event being very much subject to there being space at Beccles. 

If any friendly readers happen to see us please give us a wave, we might even wave back! 

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Socrates, hats off to you & your crew.:192_tophat:

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Well done.  Well done indeed.  we are due to be onboard from this Friday and spending the week south on the  Yare.  I will keep an eye out for thee

Griff

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Thanks, will look out for you when we head up on Wednesday. We might even cross Breydon later in the week. 

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