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Boat cookware

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On most broads boats now, there`s a 4 ring hob with oven and grill. With the exception of small day boats that often only have a single or two burner cooker,  What would you say is important cookware on a boat. On Lightning, we have the luxury of the former, and a reasonable supply of cookware. However, on our last trip in May / June this year, we left an egg poacher on board as Karen does`nt eat fried, and definitely NOT scrambled eggs. I also like to cook on board, and have considered getting another very large saucepan for cooking fresh pasta, but space might limit us. What important cookware items would you either have on board, or would like to have on a hire boat that is not already there?.

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How very interesting.      I click on the purchase button and they are completely out of stock.     

 

However good old Amazon seems to sell them.

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/insulation-stainless-KBG-4500-CS-Japanese/dp/B00EI63VDK/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1442902506&sr=8-3&keywords=Thermal+cooker

 

On review did say they got stung for overdue tax on receipt as they are imports.

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05.00    Gosh I thought we got up early enough at 5.45.           If the cookers do work it would be fantastic for the boat.   Now we will be hiring I have not got an excuse to purchase one.    Bet other half is sighing a sigh of relief.      

 

Edited by Hylander
Just found this on utube

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1 x pressure cooker

1 x Non stick Wok.

2 x non stick frying pans (1 largish, 1 small)

2 x non stick saucepans. (1 largish, 1 small)

Selection of sharp knives and wooden implements.

2 x Cafetiere (one for loose leaf tea, the other for coffee)

Those are my essentials for the galley, and pretty much in order of importance. (that is if you can have an "order of importance" for items that are essential!)

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I mentioned this to SWMBO and she frowned at the word Cookware and replied "what's that then? I have a list of all the pubs and restaurants within walking distance of the rivers - why would I need that"! Still I did ask.

A friend has one of the electric coffee makers (the pod thingies) as they dont have any gas and are coffee mad.

I bought one of these Diablo's on a whim and still yet to really have a chance to use it. Initial thoughts are not as easy as it looks (eggs take ages to cook).

https://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Toasted-Snack-Maker-40cm-Black--Red/224252011?ULP_CAMPAIGN_ID=3&gclid=CMz8-OmcisgCFQs8GwodT2kN9Q

A decent BBQ would be essential and have toyed with getting one of those Cobbs. Good for slow cooking and well insulated, but still wouldn't want to use it resting on the boat. I do like the idea of a rail mounted BBQ - but not on my boat!!!!

http://www.lakeland.co.uk/50243/Cobb-Barbecue-Cooking-System?gclid=COXgoPKdisgCFSsEwwodOOsJhQ&src=gfeed&s_kwcid=AL!49!3!69394432589!!!g!43456126342!&ef_id=VMtKQAAABcR0IUES:20150922083437:s

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I've got to say, a good can opener certainly helps me ;)

In all seriousness though I think many people were ‘brought up’ with boating holidays and things being rather pot luck as to what may or may not be onboard.  We all made do and as the years have past, slowly the boatyards are including things that make more sense to those who like to cook on board – even non-stick frying pans!

I am pretty sure however a lot of owners treat their onboard crockery, utensils and cookware as rather second rate to that they may use at home ‘it’s only for the boat’ rather than to consider the unique environment and challenges boat cooking provides. The insulated vacuum cooker is something I found out about through a You Tube channel Follow The Boat, the manufacturers have sold over 4,000 of them all over the world and are highly regarded – but if you don’t do a lot of stews or curries or food where several ingredients can be cooked in one container it could well end up becoming an permanent ATBOC (at the back of the cupboard) item. 

Instead of going for marine specific items (or those sold to be the answer to every boat owners prayers) I think just getting a decent set that covers all bases.  Non-stick saucepans and a decent sized frying pan, a good selection of sharp knifes – plus a good utility knife to use for all those boaty things so not to damage the ones for cooking.

Siliconware is handy too, you can use such to bake a loaf of bread yet they weight practically nothing and can be put practically anywhere. You can also get moulds for ice cubes that when not being used take up less space than a traditional stiff ice cube tray. 

What is probably even more handy than all of the above, are air tight containers to put left overs in, or store items without all the packaging that can take up more space.  It also means that visitors of the rodent type will leave empty handed not being able to get to the contents, not to mention keeping everything damp free and fresh.  

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After years of holiday rentals finding even a well supplied kitchen somewhat lacking, we still take at least one sharp knife, a small frying pan wooden spoon & spatula.  

Most of the cooks knifes we have encountered would suit better as spoons.

We were in a kitchen shop in Kingsbridge (Devon) looking at various kitchen aids and some knifes were on offer, these may have been ok after a lot of sharpening, I mentioned to the assistant that we normally bring a sharp knife with us on holiday, you should have seen the look on the woman's face when Tan pulled it out of her handbag as if on queue. 

I am not sure if there are wanted posters of us in the South Hams.:naughty:

Regards

Alan

 

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I am with you on the sharp knife Alan - maybe not in the handbag though!!!

If we do a cottage or any self catering in the UK we always take a couple - or you may as well just squash things like tomatoes in your hand and be done with it:dance 

As Robin said though a can opener always helps and it amazes me how many of those don't work properly (or get permanently borrowed).

We hired a lovely cottage in Lincolnshire a few years ago and was amazed when speaking to the owner as we broke a glass so offered to pay for it (they refused of course but thanked us for letting them know), but told us that they initially put very expensive pans from John Lewis in the kitchen - someone actually took them and replaced them with cheap ones out of Argos!! How bad are some folk?

Wonder if the boar hirers have the same issues?

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After years of holiday rentals finding even a well supplied kitchen somewhat lacking, we still take at least one sharp knife, a small frying pan wooden spoon & spatula.  

Most of the cooks knifes we have encountered would suit better as spoons.

We were in a kitchen shop in Kingsbridge (Devon) looking at various kitchen aids and some knifes were on offer, these may have been ok after a lot of sharpening, I mentioned to the assistant that we normally bring a sharp knife with us on holiday, you should have seen the look on the woman's face when Tan pulled it out of her handbag as if on queue. 

I am not sure if there are wanted posters of us in the South Hams.:naughty:

Regards

Alan

 

I thought it was just me!  I always have a sharp knife, my own micro-wave ware and a set of scales in the bag for each trip.  The microwave ware is an excellent light weight set, made in New Zealand but bought in a little shop in Beccles!   Obviously weight is not a problem in MS, but we originally bought a set for the caravan liked them so much so bought some more next time we were moored at the yacht station in Beccles.

 

SueH

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Never, ever buy non-stick pans  The cheap ones are next to useless and the expensive ones, not worth the money.  Invest in a couple of robust, heavy, stainless steel saucepans (the ones with copper bottoms are the best) and a similar frying pan and prove them before usie.  The weight is important for even cooking and also for increased stability.  Also, when using a frying pan, heat it BEFORE adding the oil/butter to help prevent the food sticking to the pan.

 

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May I say, that there was an excellent tin opener on Broadway2 in May a posh one! Well done Clive :clap

 

cheersIain

Hi Iain,

It would seem the tin opener did a better job and was better located than the boats head opener:shocked

Regards

Alan

 

 

Edited by ranworthbreeze

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Stainless steel 2 layer steamer, tefal frying pan and a couple of saucepans, can opener, bottle opener, corkscrew and a good set of knives,, spatula, tongs plus, of course, a proper teapot and cosy.

cheers

steve

 

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All you need is three saucepans non stick milkman fry pan small wok . selection of wooden spoons, fish slice whisk and slooted spoons chopping, tomato, bread knives, potato peeler, strainer, oven cloth.lastly a good cork screw. Every thing else are require if it makes you happy.There is a very good cookware shop in Norwich, pop in , however you will spend lots, it is a very good shop.Its up to trade standards

 

Ian

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