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Davydine

The Rights And Wrongs Of Rights Of Way

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If I had the remotest suspicion that a boat was possibly intending to cross my bows, I would hang back and let him go.  You can't rely on anyone knowing the "rules of the road" whether hirers or owners, and so prudence is the safest policy.

 

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I remember many years ago I used to drive down to Devon for holidays. Initially I'd see how often other cars would give way to me on the narrow twisting country roads. It didn't take very long for me to realise that it was far more relaxing and friendly to give way as often as possible with friendly waves and smiles.

I suspect boating on the broads is the same. Newbies comer along and try to use their "rights of way" wherever they can (whilst pushing their luck a bit with sailies,  but after a while learning to relax.

I have been boating in one form or another since I was ten, so can't really remember when I started "chilling out" on the water, but I do realise that this "chilling" doesn't come quickly or easily to someone who spends most of his life driving a car either aggressively or defensively, working for perhaps a less than easy going boss, and returning home to the domestic stresses to be found there.

Those of us who have boating experience, know and enjoy the pleasures of giving way, assisting others, and generally living life below the speed limits. Sometimes I think we need to have more patience for those still getting the hang of it.

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I find it mildly irritating when someone takes over the helm and straight away increases the speed from the, for example, 4.6 mph you've been pottering along at to bang on 5mph because that is the speed limit :default_icon_e_surprised:

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I hire from Martham boats, they dont even have rev counters, so its find a setting where the engine sounds happy, I might even consider a gps app on my tablet, I do have an external gps antenna for it that increases the accuracy a fair bit.

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8 hours ago, MauriceMynah said:

I remember many years ago I used to drive down to Devon for holidays. Initially I'd see how often other cars would give way to me on the narrow twisting country roads. It didn't take very long for me to realise that it was far more relaxing and friendly to give way as often as possible with friendly waves and smiles.

I suspect boating on the broads is the same. Newbies comer along and try to use their "rights of way" wherever they can (whilst pushing their luck a bit with sailies,  but after a while learning to relax.

I have been boating in one form or another since I was ten, so can't really remember when I started "chilling out" on the water, but I do realise that this "chilling" doesn't come quickly or easily to someone who spends most of his life driving a car either aggressively or defensively, working for perhaps a less than easy going boss, and returning home to the domestic stresses to be found there.

Those of us who have boating experience, know and enjoy the pleasures of giving way, assisting others, and generally living life below the speed limits. Sometimes I think we need to have more patience for those still getting the hang of it.

I totally agree about the driving. My job involves a lot of driving and it is enormously relaxing to stay out of the way of all the stressed and angy people out there who chose to drive aggressively.

I sort of agree about boating and chilling out. In the example I gave, it was the private boat that was doing the shouting, so I am assuming they weren't a newbie, but you never know.

I suppose I have done quite a lot of boating over the years, several broads holidays, but most of my miles have been done sailing on the east coast, between the rivers Colne, Orwell, Deben and Crouch, with the occasional trip further afield. Nothing better than anticipating where other people are going and staying out of their way, likewise helping others and accepting help is one of the great joys of boating. Being afloat is a great leveller, regardless of being in a boat worth a few hundred quid or a super yacht worth severl hundred thousand.

Having said that, I was always taught that I should know who had right of way and that the stand on vessel had a duty to do just that and keep going, particularly when a small boat (like mine was!) is crossing the the path of something much bigger, because stopping suddenly could cause bigger problems.

It was all of the shouting coming from one boat that stuck in my mind. Such aggresion is rare on the Broads, which is why I asked the question. The moral of this story for me is that life is easier if we chill out and stay out of each others way, but if you do get a bit too close to another boat and you are going to shout and wave your hands about, you should be sure you actually had right of way, otherwise you look a bit daft.

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I find it's far better to keep calm, smile sweetly, wave gently, and carry a battery drill and holesaw, they have to moor somewhere..... :default_icon_twisted:

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