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Closed Season Decision In The Spring 2019.


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I love the closed season, no fishing kit spread out all over moorings. No moorings blocked off. No rods half way across the rivers. No grumpy faces on the riverbanks. I know most fisherpeople are cons

Sorry but I hope it stays. Try mooring at the likes of Loddon or Rockland in season. They are supposed to shift but never do. There are fishing platforms dotted about but I've yet to see one used. 

As we have been round this argument several times before I will  suggest we concentrate more on whether or not the closed fishing season is a good thing. It is well documented that I believe the otter

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I love the closed season, no fishing kit spread out all over moorings. No moorings blocked off. No rods half way across the rivers. No grumpy faces on the riverbanks. I know most fisherpeople are considerate and pleasant but we always seem to come across the exceptions! I hope nothing changes. :default_gbxhmm::default_gbxhmm:

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I've fished since I was seven years old, so that's getting on for 60 years. I grew up fishing gravel and clay pits, which were mostly 'club waters'. When the 'you can choose' whether to keep the 'close season' on enclosed still waters, happened in the eighties, a change that was pushed by 'commercial fisheries'. The members of the clubs/associations that I belonged to, voted resoundingly to retain the close season. Not only for the benefit of spawning fish, which is a moot issue as many species, Pike for example, can spawn as early as February, while the cyprinids, Common Carp, Tench, Crucian Carp, might not spawn until July. The reason was not only to give the majority of fish species a peaceful spawning and recovery period. But to give riverside plants the spring period to regenerate untrampled, to allow birdlife and bankside wildlife, the time to nest, breed and feed their young undisturbed too. Most anglers are proud of their 'being at one with nature' reputation. So, in my opinion and it's only my opinion, the 'close season' should be kept, if only for the reasons above. I'm pleased to say, the angling clubs I belong to, keep the 'close season' both on rivers and still waters. To be honest, I don't think I'd be comfortable as a member of any club or organisation that didn't still uphold these values...

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Bramerton is a great example of inconsiderate fishing. Fishing is actually prohibited there between March and September but, each time we have passed by or moored up, there has been at least one person fishing from the bank. There’s not much point in the BA putting up a sign if they are just going to pass by and ignore what’s happening there! That of course is just a boater’s point of view but I think kingfisher666’s post above spells out the good that the close season does with regard to regeneration. 

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I to have been an angler for over 60 years and I am quiet happy to retain the close season, one thing to bare in mind even if it is removed on running waters is that large parts of the broads area are SSIs or Conservation areas so may still remain closed, there are plenty of alternatives for those that are desperate to fish for 12 months of the year.

Fred

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49 minutes ago, vanessan said:

Bramerton is a great example of inconsiderate fishing. Fishing is actually prohibited there between March and September but, each time we have passed by or moored up, there has been at least one person fishing from the bank. There’s not much point in the BA putting up a sign if they are just going to pass by and ignore what’s happening there! That of course is just a boater’s point of view but I think kingfisher666’s post above spells out the good that the close season does with regard to regeneration. 

Dont talk to me about Bramerton Woods End ,   last time we were there , there were two guys fishing (ready to take the fish away and eat them, say no more as to who they were) sat right next to the sign saying NO FISHING.     We shifted them up a bit when we arrived and if looks could kill we would be no more.   What with them and the Brundall lot that descend for the weekend and stay put all weekend.  :default_badday:

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We have 3 lakes at our club 2 are open all year 1 has a closed season. I can't say we have noticed a difference in fish or wildlife on them. What I miss is the exitement of June the 16th coming around, the anticipation after 3 months was better than waiting for Christmas.

Sent from the Norfolk Broads Network mobile app

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40 minutes ago, MauriceMynah said:

they might all go away,,, and we wouldn't want that now, would we?

MM, there are times when you are what my wife Susie would call "a bit naughty!" In fact I seem to remember she called you that during the Spring Meet!  

I think I know what you mean though. We must always be careful of the balance of nature on the Broads. We have much better water quality now, which means we have many more fish. This is why we have many more grebe, which had become a rare bird, in the 60s. But it also means the otter has been able to return, when they used to be extinct in England owing to polluted water.

Like the marsh harrier, which is also in revival, the otter is a carnivorous predator. They will kill whatever they can catch, right up to an adult greylag goose, which we have seen filmed on this forum. The big dog otter is the swimming equivalent of the dog fox and maybe they are soon going to have to be controlled, for similar reasons?

Whilst I don't want to divert this thread, let me ask this :

When was the last time you got up early, walked along the river bank and disturbed a waterhen, which gave a sudden clucking call and rushed off across the river, half flying and half running, leaving its footprints in the still water in a long wake behind it? Or when have you lain in bed in the morning, listening to the clicking and clucking of the coots?

They're not there any more. In my last three Broads holidays I have never seen one. But what has killed them off? It can't be bad water quality, can it?

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Personally, i would rather see the closed season abolished, as the op says, it`s outdated, and does NOTHING for spawning fish. I`ve seen fish spawning as early as the beginning of February, and as late as late August, so spawning is NOT  a genuine issue. 

Otters are now becomeing a pest, they`re nothing less than vicious predators that kill full stop, and leave their kills without eating them.  I`ve often seen dead fish with only one or two bites taken, and then left. Not only that, down here in East Dorset, and West Hampshire, the local angling shops have put out news letters about the fish stocks being decimated, and Otters being the reason. 

I do however agree about the plant and wildlife on the riverbank being able to regenerate, but then WE (us boaters) could be asked to share some of the blame for treading down plants etc as we moor and walk to the pub or village, would you ban boating for 3 months between mid March and mid June?.

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22 minutes ago, Vaughan said:

MM, there are times when you are what my wife Susie would call "a bit naughty!" In fact I seem to remember she called you that during the Spring Meet!  

I think I know what you mean though. We must always be careful of the balance of nature on the Broads. We have much better water quality now, which means we have many more fish. This is why we have many more grebe, which had become a rare bird, in the 60s. But it also means the otter has been able to return, when they used to be extinct in England owing to polluted water.

Like the marsh harrier, which is also in revival, the otter is a carnivorous predator. They will kill whatever they can catch, right up to an adult greylag goose, which we have seen filmed on this forum. The big dog otter is the swimming equivalent of the dog fox and maybe they are soon going to have to be controlled, for similar reasons?

Whilst I don't want to divert this thread, let me ask this :

When was the last time you got up early, walked along the river bank and disturbed a waterhen, which gave a sudden clucking call and rushed off across the river, half flying and half running, leaving its footprints in the still water in a long wake behind it? Or when have you lain in bed in the morning, listening to the clicking and clucking of the coots?

They're not there any more. In my last three Broads holidays I have never seen one. But what has killed them off? It can't be bad water quality, can it?

When we were on Lightning back in mid June, i always like to look at the wildlife. I saw Coots - 0, yes, that IS ZERO. yet years ago, they were one of the most prolific. We did see several Marsh Harriers, But less than a dozen ducks, which i could`nt believe, as they were the most prolific, but we did see quite a lot of geese. So i would agree with Vaughn above, the otter is nothing more than vermin, a pest which is badly in need of culling.

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So on the evidence of Vaughan, you want to cull otters? Well thats a pretty scientific study!!! Just perhaps,there are other reasons, like climate change?

Plenty of coot around in the winter  -  there were 2 flocks of at least 500+ this winter on Hickling! And I think that in the early part of this century, when the coot shoots occurred every winter, I guess otters were around also? There are plenty of moorhen off the main river in the ponds and dykes, but I do agree they have gone off the main river.

I think Vaughan you are going to have to produce more than that to convince me it is the fault of otters!!!

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There are still Ducks, Coots and Moorhens around just depends on where you look, I am a nature lover but also a realist and when it comes to control of top predators in this country like Otters, Cormorants, Foxes etc having removed Wolves and Bears  mankind is now the only controlling factor the same  applies to Deer and will eventually be the case with other reintroduced species like Beaver, Red Kites etc it dosn`t matter how cute an animal is to maintain a healthy population numbers need to be kept within sustainable limits, you could even say the same applies to the human race as well when you look around at the countries that are unable to sustain thier population as unpalatable as that sounds.

Fred

 

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As we have been round this argument several times before I will  suggest we concentrate more on whether or not the closed fishing season is a good thing. It is well documented that I believe the otter to be a significant contributor to the diminishing wildfowl population, and it is equally well documented that there is a number who hold an opposing view.

I for one am in favour of the closed season for several reasons, some of which I admit are selfish. I do believe it gives mother nature a bit of a breather, and, yes, it does give a boater a rest from trying to search out the hidden angler with his 120 metre roach pole going across the river and two counties.

Football has a season, cricket has a season, even strictly come dancing has a season (mercifully short) so why not fishing?  

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19 minutes ago, grendel said:

Yes , I too believe there should be a closed season for fishermen, after all, if we hunt them all year around they are never going to be able to breed, and they dont breed well in captivity.:default_gbxhmm:

I understand the otters are trying to organise a cull, to improve fish stocks!

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11 hours ago, marshman said:

Plenty of coot around in the winter  -  there were 2 flocks of at least 500+ this winter on Hickling!

At the risk of prolonging this discussion, I wonder if this might be because Hickling is not a normal habitat for the otter? They spend most of their time on hard dry land and enter the water to hunt, so their habitat is earth river banks, not reed bed and fen.

They are also very sensitive to the quality of fresh water and I wonder if the rather still water in the Hickling area would be suitable for them?

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11 hours ago, marshman said:

So on the evidence of Vaughan, you want to cull otters? Well thats a pretty scientific study!!! Just perhaps,there are other reasons, like climate change?

By the way, the simple opinion of a Broadsman, based on what he sees around him, does not need to be a scientific study. We have organisations, even Royal Societies, for that. I wonder what the RSPB or the NWT have to say about the serious decline of two of the most well known and typical bird species on the Broads?

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