Jump to content
  • Announcements

    Welcome! New around here? Take a look at the New Members' Guide for some pointers.

    Not a member yet? Sign up here and you can soon be chatting away with friends old and new..

    Check out our Handy Information section if you're after something quickly!

  • If you would like to support the forum, please consider visiting the forum shop, where you can purchase such items as NBN Burgees, Window Stickers, or even a custom Limited Edition Wooden Throttle Control Knob

    Forum Shop

Coryton

Beginner's Questions

Recommended Posts

If the friendly people on here will indulge me in some more beginner's questions...

There are a few things that I haven't been able to figure out from reading this forum and elsewhere on the web.

For background, we will be hiring a cruiser on the Broads in August ("Beam of Light", which I believe is an Aquafibre Diamond 43). Our first time on the Broads, but we have a couple of weeks boating experience in Ireland.

So...

Tides. A new concept to us. Clearly it doesn't work if you tie up tightly at high tide, leaving you dangling from the ropes or pulling bits off the boat as the tide falls. But doesn't that leave the boat floating loose at high tide? OK so you can adjust the ropes as the tide falls...but not so easily overnight. Instructions I can find from the hire boat yards on-line are a bit vague.

Mooring ropes. Lots of guides to mooring suggest using springs in some conditions. Hire boats we've had elsewhere have only come with two mooring ropes. Is it likely to be the same here? If we ask nicely do we get more?

Actually, is there anything we ought to ask for that you don't get unless you ask? I've seen it suggested that one politely requests a second mud weight so that the boat doesn't swing round when mud weighting.

And on mud weighting...spending the night floating in a broad sounds fun, but would people here risk it without a dinghy as an escape route? We could ask for one, but don't want the extra hassle of having to deal with it when mooring.

I think that's it for now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trick is not to just tie the ropes at 90’ but to take the bank side stern rope  forward to a post around the middle of the boat and the other outer corner stern rope back to a post so the rope is approx 45 degree angle and the same with the bow lines this will allow for rise and fall but keep the boat close to the bank.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tides, only really worry overly about these if going down south, stern mooring at oulton broad, watch out ror the rubbing strip as the tide goes out, if you put a spring on the ropes should be ok - eg moor using the ropes from the other side of the boat, or run the stern rope forward and the bow rope back. so they cross.

most boats will have 4 mooring lines - 2 on each side - and a mudweight, there may be extra in a locker, along with the rhond anchors, dont worry overly about a  dinghy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. That was quick! 

6 minutes ago, grendel said:

tides, only really worry overly about these if going down south, stern mooring at oulton broad, watch out ror the rubbing strip as the tide goes out,

Ah yes - I meant to say that we definitely intend on heading South...haven't been put off the thought of crossing Breydon Water (will try not to end up like the Margoletta). Our time in Ireland has given us some practise at having to stay the right side of marker posts.

8 minutes ago, grendel said:

tides, only really worry overly about these if going down south, stern mooring at oulton broad, watch out ror the rubbing strip as the tide goes out, if you put a spring on the ropes should be ok - eg moor using the ropes from the other side of the boat, or run the stern rope forward and the bow rope back. so they cross.

Still having difficulty visualising why springs work the way they do, but if works, it works...

9 minutes ago, grendel said:

most boats will have 4 mooring lines - 2 on each side - and a mudweight, there may be extra in a locker, along with the rhond anchors, dont worry overly about a  dinghy

Four mooring lines? Luxury!

As for mud weights and rhond anchors, it still seems a bit strange you're allowed to do that. In Ireland (on hire boats anyway) bank mooring (indeed getting close to the banks at all) was strictly forbidden and the anchor was only to come out in dire emergency. One lough had some experimental buoys you could tie up to, but definitely not overnight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Coryton First mud weighting you drop a weight from the bow usually this anchors the boat to the bottom but it will swing depending on the direction of the wind and tide this is not a issue providing you moor/mud weight far enough away from any obstacles and allow a certain amount of spare slack to allow for a rising tide not necessary if done at high tide, as you will then drop and have more slack, you also need a little slack so the rope is not vertical but at a angle which allows less pull on rope, it can be irritating if using the teli as the aerial wll move and lose the signal hence some use a additionaltal weight to stop this. Mooring to the bank if you take the rope from the fursite cleat this will give you more scoop so as you drop/rise it pulls/shortains the rope less,additily if you tie off further away along the bank also gives more scoop, it doesn't matter if the boat moves along the bank or away as long as you don't step of without checking the gap between bank and boat. Why would you want a escape dinghy your not going to sink are you, only useful to get to the pub. don't worry it will be all right on the night thousands manage with out any misshape just use a bit of common sense you don't park your car close to another so's not able to open your door do you!. Just bring a largest torch with spare battery and a tape/string if you wear glasses and a pair of gardening gloves can be useful along with antacid tablets if you suffer from indigestion. Enjoy your holiday . John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

be warned that the mud weight can and will take a good hold, if you are struggling to lift it, just reverse away from the weight, and it will pull free of the mud,  you might even want to leave it just below the water surface for a short way to wash the 'orrible black mud off it

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, grendel said:

be warned that the mud weight can and will take a good hold, if you are struggling to lift it, just reverse away from the weight, and it will pull free of the mud,  you might even want to leave it just below the water surface for a short way to wash the 'orrible black mud off it

Somewhere I read a suggestion that "excess" mud should be removed before putting the mud weight on board.

It didn't explain how much mud is excess and what is the correct amount of mud to have on a mud weight.

(Sorry - I do tend do be a bit pedantic about interpreting instructions...)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tie it off so it is just in the water travel a hundred metres or so then bring it back on board all clean of river mud , no reason to have any mud on the weight when stowing aboard 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do come up with plenty of mud on them - just tie it off a little below the  water and move off slowly and the forward motion will clean it. However, don't leave it dangling very long as everyone will shout at you - as if you didnt know!!

There has been some chat about mudweighting fore and aft but in reality its only the fishermen who want to do this so they stay in the same spot - I would never moor fore and aft on mudweights  overnight as a change in wind direction might put you broadside on, giving more wind resistance and a greater chance of dragging. If you dont care which way you are pointing, use only the one from the bow and the boat will sit head to wind however much it shifts. I rarely if ever moor to a bank and will always mudweight as a preference, especially if it is hot, as you will generally be in a breeze moored off in a Broad.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Coryton said:

Still having difficulty visualising why springs work the way they do, but if works, it works...

I use the offside ropes to keep to the bank and the nearside ropes to minimise forward and backward movement. The longer longer the ropes are, the more rise and fall they will cope with.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, marshman said:

There has been some chat about mudweighting fore and aft but in reality its only the fishermen who want to do this so they stay in the same spot - I would never moor fore and aft on mudweights  overnight as a change in wind direction might put you broadside on, giving more wind resistance and a greater chance of dragging. 

There was a suggestion above that it helps with TV reception if you're not swinging around on the mud weight.

This is not something that would concern me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, grendel said:

be warned that the mud weight can and will take a good hold, if you are struggling to lift it, just reverse away from the weight, and it will pull free of the mud,  you might even want to leave it just below the water surface for a short way to wash the 'orrible black mud off it

Yeah, that`s exactly what i did leaving Loddon quay. I think leaving it dangling in the water is the best way to clean it. However, leaving it there until you get past Cantly does wonders for your fuel consumption :default_icon_redface: :default_icon_redface: :default_icon_redface:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, marshman said:

A TV on a boat? What will they think of next?

Better off with a fishing rod for me, and some music and a book for Karen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SPEEDTRIPLE said:

Better off with a fishing rod for me, and some music and a book for Karen. 

Well I wouldn't go for the fishing...but I wouldn't particularly want to be watching television either.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Coryton said:

Well I wouldn't go for the fishing...but I wouldn't particularly want to be watching television either.

Why not, i caught a 7lb Bream at Loddon Quay last June, which was also a personal best.  I only ever caught small stuff until then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, SPEEDTRIPLE said:

Why not, i caught a 7lb Bream at Loddon Quay last June, which was also a personal best.  I only ever caught small stuff until then.

I suppose all I could answer that with is why?

There's lots of things I haven't tried, and I'm afraid fishing isn't high up the list of ones I'd like to. 

I think we can both agree that boating is fun though. I would happily do a lot more of that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Coryton said:

I suppose all I could answer that with is why?

a gentleman of perspicacity

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, chameleon said:

a gentleman of perspicacity

There are a lot of good deodorants on the market now.  

  • Haha 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a mallet with you to make it easier when using rhond anchors. We forgot ours one year..... what a nightmare when the ground is rock solid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Kron said:

Take a mallet with you to make it easier when using rhond anchors. We forgot ours one year..... what a nightmare when the ground is rock solid!

Yes a rubber mallet is on the list of things that Herbert Woods suggest you take with you.

I think somewhere I read that they give you an extra rhond anchor to use as a substitute mallet, which doesn't sound as useful.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Coryton said:

Yes a rubber mallet is on the list of things that Herbert Woods suggest you take with you.

I think somewhere I read that they give you an extra rhond anchor to use as a substitute mallet, which doesn't sound as useful.

Depends on how much time you want to hammer away at it, rather use a small club hammer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, there an excellent short video here somewhere showing the easy way to get them in and out of the ground.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • NBN Mobile App

    Want to use NBN when you're out and about?

    Get our mobile app for Android and iOS!

    Get it on Google Play

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

For details of our Guidelines, please take a look at the Terms of Use here.